Zvhil (Hasidic dynasty)

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Zvhil is the name of a Hasidic dynasty which originated with Rabbi Moshe of Zvhil, the son of Rabbi Yechiel Michl, the Magid (Preacher) of Zlotshev. He was also the grandson of Rabbi Yitzchok of Drubitsh and Rabbi Aharon of Karlin. As in several inter-related Hasidic dynasties, family tradition held that Rabbi Moshe was a descendant of King David.

Rabbi Moshe died in 1831 and was succeeded by his son Rabbi Yechiel Michl Goldman of Zvhil. The last rebbe to reside in Zvhil was Grand Rabbi Yaakov Yisroel. Rabbi Yaakov Yisroel was also the Tsar-appointed Chief Rabbi of the Ukraine.

The town of Zvhil (Ukrainian: Zvyahel) is located in Volhynia, in present-day Ukraine. Today it is known as Novohrad-Volynskyi. The Jewish version of the name, Zvhil, instead of Zvyahel can be attributed to the similarity between Zvhil and Zvul (one of the holy names for the ancient Jewish Temple in Hebrew, pronounced 'Zvil' by Ukrainian Jews).

Today, there are three Zvhiller Rebbes, who are cousins. One is the Zvhil-Mezhbizh Rebbe of Boston, MA, Grand Rabbi Yitzhak Aharon Korff, grandson of Grand Rabbi Yaakov Yisroel who was a son-in-law of Reb Yechiel Michl the Second. The other two, Rabbi Avraham Goldman in Jerusalem (d. 2009) and Rabbi Shlomo Goldman in Union City, New Jersey, are descended from Reb Yechiel Michel the Second's younger brother, Reb Shlomke of Zvhil.

Lineage[edit]

  • Rabbi Isaac of Drubitsh (d. 1752)
    • Rabbi Yechiel Michl, the Maggid of Zlotshev (1726-1781), son of Rabbi Isaac. A disciple of Rabbi Israel Baal Shem Tov, founder of Hasidism.
      • Rebbe Moshe of Zvhil (d. 1831), son of the Maggid of Zlotshev.
        • Rebbe Yechiel Michl Goldman of Zvhil (1788-1856), son of Rebbe Moshe.
          • Rabbi Mordechai Goldman of Zvhil (d. 1900), son of Rabbi Yechiel Michel.
            • Rabbi Yechiel Michl of Zvhil (d. 1917), elder son of Rabbi Mordechai.
              • Rabbi Yaakov Yisrael of Zvhil-Mezhbizh in Boston, son of Rabbi Mordechai of Mezhbizh, son-in-law of Rabbi Yechiel Michel of Zvhil.
                • Rabbi Dr. Yitzhak Aharon Korff of Zvhil-Mezhbizh, grandson of Rabbi Yaakov Yisroel, son-in-law of the Shomer Emunim Rebbe, Grand Rabbi Avrohom Chayim Roth of Jerusalem and Bnei Brak (son of Reb Areleh). Chaplain of the city of Boston.
            • Rabbi Shlomo "Shlomke" Goldman of Zvhil-Jerusalem (d. 1945), younger son of Rabbi Mordechai.
              • Rabbi Gedalia Moshe Goldman of Zvhil-Jerusalem (d. 1950), son of Rabbi Shlomo.
                • Rabbi Mordechai Goldman (II) of Zvhil (1910-1981), son of Rabbi Gedalia Moshe
                  • Rabbi Avraham Goldman of Zvhil-Jerusalem (1933-2009), son of Rabbi Mordechai
                    • Rabbi Shlomoh Goldman, present Zvhiller Rebbe of Jerusalem, son of Rabbi Avraham
                  • Rabbi Shlomo Goldman, present Zvhiller Rebbe of Union City, NJ, son of Rabbi Mordechai, son-in-law of Rabbi Yekusiel Yehudah Halberstam of Klausenberg
                • Rabbi Elazar Adler, Zvhiller Rebbe of Los Angeles (1921 – February 27, 2007), son of Rabbi Yosef Yehoshua Aharon of Lelov, married the daughter of Rebbe Moshe of Blendov (of the Kozhnitz dynasty), whose wife was the daughter of R' Shlomke. Originally of Jerusalem, he emigrated to America in early June 1938 and settled in the West Adams section of Los Angeles, California; later relocating to the Beverly-Fairfax area of West Hollywood.[citation needed] He was a beloved and revered figure in Los Angeles.[1] His home was a source of hospitality and his assistance critical to many immigrants who settled in Los Angeles after World War II. One of Rabbi Adler’s early staunch supporters was Mr. Harry Maizlish, general manager, later owner of radio station KFWB of Los Angeles and a close associate and friend of Jack and Harry Warner, founders of Warner Brothers Studios. World War II began before Rabbi Adler could bring his wife and only daughter Miriam, from Jerusalem. Mr. Maizlish introduced a number of Hollywood personalities to his Orthodox Chasidic rabbi including Mrs. Edward G. Robinson, who helped provide assistance to bring the Rabbi’s family from Israel to Los Angeles in July 1944.[2][citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Meeting Transcript Los Angeles Board of Supervisors, April 10, 2007, p. 67 
  2. ^ Alfasi, Yitsḥaḳ (1995–1998). ha-Ḥasidut mi-dor le-dor (החסידות מדור לדור) [Hasidism from generation to generation] (in Hebrew). Jerusalem: Mekhon Daʻat Yosef. pp. 116, 261. LCCN 95828260. 

See also[edit]

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