12-bit

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Bit
1 4 8 12 16 18 24 26 31 32 36 48 60 64 128 256 512
Application
16 32 64
Floating point precision
×½ ×1 ×2 ×4
Floating point decimal precision
32 64 128

In computer architecture, 12-bit integers, memory addresses, or other data units are those that are at most 12 bits (1.5 octets) wide. Also, 12-bit CPU and ALU architectures are those that are based on registers, address buses, or data buses of that size. Possibly the best-known 12-bit CPU is the PDP-8 and its relatives, such as Intersil 6100 microprocessor produced in various incarnations from August 1963 to mid-1990. Many ADCs (analog to digital converters) have a 12-bit resolution. Some PIC microcontrollers use a 12-bit word size.

12 binary digits have 4096 (10000 octal, 1000 hexadecimal) distinct combinations. Hence, a microprocessor with 12-bit memory addresses can directly access 4096 bytes (4KiB) of word-addressable memory.

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