Apache Junction, Arizona

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Apache Junction, Arizona
City
Superstitionmountain.jpg
Official seal of Apache Junction, Arizona
Seal
Location in Pinal County and the state of Arizona
Location in Pinal County and the state of Arizona
Coordinates: 33°24′54″N 111°32′46″W / 33.41500°N 111.54611°W / 33.41500; -111.54611Coordinates: 33°24′54″N 111°32′46″W / 33.41500°N 111.54611°W / 33.41500; -111.54611
Country United States
State Arizona
Counties Maricopa, Pinal
Incorporated 1978
Government
 • Mayor John Insalaco
Area
 • Total 34.2 sq mi (88.7 km2)
 • Land 34.2 sq mi (88.7 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 1,722 ft (525 m)
Population (2010)[1]
 • Total 35,840
 • Estimate (2013[2]) 37,130
 • Density 944.36/sq mi (364.11/km2)
Time zone MST (no daylight saving time) (UTC-7)
ZIP codes 85119-85120
Area code(s) 480
FIPS code 04-02830
Website http://www.ajcity.net/

Apache Junction is a city in Maricopa and Pinal counties in the State of Arizona. According to the 2010 census, the population of the city was 35,840,[1] most of whom lived in Pinal County.

Apache Junction is named for the junction of the Apache Trail and U.S. Route 60. Superstition Mountain, the westernmost peak of the Superstition Mountains, is nearby.

Geography[edit]

Apache Junction is at 33°24′54″N 111°32′46″W / 33.415035°N 111.546025°W / 33.415035; -111.546025.[3]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has an area of 34.2 square miles (89 km2), all land.

The town is bounded by the Superstition Mountains (a federal wilderness area and home of the Lost Dutchman's Gold Mine) on the east, the Goldfield Mountains with the Bulldog Recreation Area on the north and the city of Mesa, Arizona on the west. Goldfield Ghost Town, a popular tourist spot preserved from former prospecting days, nestles near the western face of Superstition Mountain just off Highway 88 (Apache Trail).[4]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1970 3,863
1980 9,935 157.2%
1990 18,092 82.1%
2000 31,814 75.8%
2010 35,840 12.7%
Est. 2013 37,130 3.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
2013 Estimate[2]
[6]

As of the census of 2010, there were 35,840 people, 15,574 households, and 9,372 families residing in the city. The population density was 929.3 people per square mile (358.9/km²). There were 22,771 housing units at an average density of 665.1 per square mile (256.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 89.5% White, 1.2% Black or African American, 1.1% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 4.9% from other races, and 2.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.4% of the population.

There were 15,574 households out of which 19.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.6% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.8% were non-families. 31.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.85.

In the city the population had 19.9% under the age of 20, 4.5% from 20 to 24, 20.4% from 25 to 44, 27.1% from 45 to 64, and 26.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.5 years.

The median income (as of the 2000 census) for a household in the city was $33,170, and the median income for a family was $37,726. Males had a median income of $31,283 versus $22,836 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,806. About 7.3% of families and 11.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.4% of those under age 18 and 7.4% of those age 65 or over.

In popular culture[edit]

This city was one of the filming locations for HBO's 1994 film Blind Justice.[7] In the 2003 dark comedy film Bad Santa, the character of Santa tells a child that Apache Junction is the suburb that most resembles the North Pole.[8] A scene from Jerry Maguire was also filmed there, in which Cuba Gooding, Jr.'s character is filming a commercial with a camel. In "Stand-Up Revolution, Episode 2," by Gabriel Iglesias, he uses Apache Junction as an example of a redneck place, in a joke about comedy clubs. He says that a catchy place name is often used on a show which contains a number of people from the same racial or ethnic group.[9]

References[edit]

External links[edit]