Derek Kilmer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Derek Kilmer
Derek Kilmer 113th Congress.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Washington's 6th district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 3, 2013
Preceded by Norm Dicks
Member of the Washington Senate
from the 26th district
In office
January 3, 2007 – January 3, 2013
Preceded by Robert Oke
Succeeded by Nathan Schlicher
Member of the Washington House of Representatives
from the 26th district
In office
January 3, 2005 – January 3, 2007
Preceded by Lois McMahan
Succeeded by Larry Seaquist
Personal details
Born Derek Christian Kilmer
(1974-01-01) January 1, 1974 (age 40)
Port Angeles, Washington
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Jennifer Kilmer
Residence Artondale, Washington
Alma mater Princeton University, University of Oxford
Profession business consultant and manager
Religion United Methodist Church
Website Representative Derek Kilmer

Derek Christian Kilmer (born January 1, 1974) is an American politician who has been the U.S. Representative for Washington's 6th congressional district since 2013. A Democrat, Kilmer previously served as a member of the Washington House of Representatives from 2005 to 2007 and as a member of the Washington State Senate from 2007 to 2013, representing the 26th district.

On March 5, 2012, Kilmer announced he was running to succeed Norm Dicks for the seat representing Washington's 6th congressional district.[1] On November 6, 2012, Kilmer won the general election to become the district's next representative.[2] He received 186,661 votes, to opponent Bill Driscoll's 129,725.[3]

Early life, education, and business career[edit]

Kilmer was born and raised in the Olympic Peninsula, Washington. Both of his parents were public school teachers. Kilmer earned his certificate in American Studies from Princeton University. He went on to earn his BA in public affairs from Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He won a Marshall Scholarship to obtain his PhD in Comparative Social Policy from the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford.[4]

Kilmer is a former business consultant for McKinsey and Company. He was also a business retention manager for the Economic Development Board for Tacoma-Pierce County. He is also a trustee for Tacoma Community College and served on the board of Peninsula Schools Education Foundation.[5][6]

Washington legislature[edit]

Elections[edit]

In 2004, Kilmer decided to challenge incumbent Republican State Representative Lois McMahan of Washington's 26th house district, seat 2. He defeated her 50%-48%, a difference of 1,009 votes.[7]

In 2006, Republican State Senator Bob Oke decided to retire. Kilmer decided to run for Washington's 26th senate district. He defeated Republican Jim Hines 60%-40%.[8] In 2010, he won re-election to a second term, defeating Marty McClendon 59%-41%.[9]

Tenure[edit]

In 2007, he was one of just three Democratic state senators to vote against the bill that would allow labor unions to spend non-members' bargaining fees on political causes without first getting their permission.[10]

He sponsored the senate bill that would increase fines to pay for a new $849 million Tacoma Narrows bridge in his district.[11]

Business groups have praised Kilmer for being one of the most pro-business Democrats in Olympia. He is the three-time recipient of the “LEADER Award” from the Washington Economic Development Association. He was named the "Legislative Business Star Award" from Enterprise Washington's Business Institute. He was named “Legislator of the Year” by the Department of Veterans Affairs. He was recognized by the Northwest Chapter of the Paralyzed Veterans of America as “Legislator of the Year”. He was also named “Legislator of the Year” by the Washington Council of Police & Sheriffs. He was named an "Honorary Fire Chief" by the Washington Fire Chiefs.[12]

Committee Assignments (State of Washington)[edit]

Senate
  • Capital Budget Committee (Chair)
  • Economic Development, Trade, & Innovation Committee
  • Higher Education & Workforce Development Committee
  • Ways and Means Committee (Vice Chair)[13]

U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

2012 election[edit]

After redistricting, Democratic U.S. Congressman Norm Dicks decided to retire. Kilmer decided to run for the newly redrawn Washington's 6th congressional district. He won the endorsements from The Seattle Times, which called him “a problem solver who can be bipartisan.” The News Tribune of Tacoma praised him for having “an uncommon understanding of trade, business taxation, smart regulation, job creation and other fundamentals of economic growth.” Port Angeles, Rep. Kilmer's hometown and an area for which he was elected to represent suffers from an unemployment rate 2.3 percent higher than the Washington State average, consonant with the rate of increase recorded before he took office.[14][15] In the November general election, he defeated Republican nominee Bill Driscoll 59%-41%. He won all six counties in the district.[16][17]

Middle East Policy[edit]

Derek Kilmer was a cosponsor of the United States–Israel Strategic Partnership Act of 2013.[18] This act has been criticized by organizations such as "US campaign to end the Israeli occupation" for its unfair treatment of US citizens.[19]

Kilmer was part of a 37-member congressional delegation that visited Israel. The trip was sponsored by American Israel Education Foundation, with the intention of working to strengthen strategic economic and military cooperation between Israel and the United States.[20]

Co-Sponsorship of the United States-Israel Partnership Act of 2013[edit]

Through his cosponsorship of the United States-Israel Strategic Partnership Act of 2013,[21] Rep. Kilmer supports funding of Israel's military, and to provide assistance for cooperation in the fields of energy, water, homeland security, agriculture, and alternative fuel technologies.

Committee Assignment (US House of Representatives)[edit]

Elwha River Debacle[edit]

Rep. Kilmer, in 2013, inherited the controversy surrounding the National Park Service, in combination with USF&G, WF&G, and the WDOE demolition of two dams on the Elwha River, one of the most pristine sport fishing rivers in the United States. Environmental interests successfully lobbied to have the two dams removed theoretically to allow "native run salmon" to migrate into higher elevations of the Elwha river watershed. The result of the Federally funded $350,000,000 demolition project however polluted the lower reaches of the Elwha river below the old dam sites and plugged the water intakes for the new City of Port Angeles water treatment facility. No one currently takes responsibility for the resultant desertification of the lower Elwha river.

References[edit]

http://votesmart.org/candidate/biography/51516/derek-kilmer#.UPdB2x37LN0 http://blog.thenewstribune.com/politics/2013/01/04/house-committees-denny-heck-to-financial-services-derek-kilmer-to-science-space-technology/ http://public.cq.com/docs/news/news-000004172493.html http://www.theolympian.com/2012/11/07/2311365/democrats-derek-kilmer-denny-heck.html http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2019621639_elexcongresslocal07m.html

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Norm Dicks
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Washington's 6th congressional district

January 3, 2013 – present
Incumbent
United States order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Dan Kildee
D-Michigan
United States Representatives by seniority
392nd
Succeeded by
Ann McLane Kuster
D-New Hampshire