Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit

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Archdiocese of Detroit
Archidioecesis Detroitensis
Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit.svg
Location
Country United States
Territory Counties of Lapeer, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, St. Clair, and Wayne
Ecclesiastical province Detroit
Statistics
Area 3,901 km2 (1,506 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2006)
4,523,000
1,350,000[1] (32.5%)
Parishes 269
Information
Denomination Roman Catholic
Rite Roman Rite
Established March 8, 1833 (181 years ago)
Cathedral Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament
Patron saint St. Anne
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Archbishop Allen Henry Vigneron
Auxiliary Bishops Michael J. Byrnes
José Cepeda
Donald Hanchon
Francis R. Reiss
Vicar General Rev. Msgr. Robert McClory
Emeritus Bishops Adam Maida
Thomas Gumbleton
Map
Archdiocese of Detroit map 1.png
Website
www.aod.org

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit (Latin: Archidioecesis Detroitensis) is an archdiocese of the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church covering (as of 2005) the Michigan counties of Lapeer, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, St. Clair, and Wayne. It is the metropolitan archdiocese for the Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Detroit, which includes all dioceses in the state of Michigan. In addition, in 2000 the archdiocese accepted pastoral responsibility[2] for the Roman Catholic Church in the Cayman Islands, which consists of Saint Ignatius Parish[3] on Grand Cayman (the Archdiocese of Kingston maintains a mission sui iuris jurisdiction over the Cayman Islands).[4]

Established as the Diocese of Detroit on March 8, 1833, it was elevated to Archdiocese on May 22, 1937. Ste. Anne's in Detroit is the second oldest continuously-operating Roman Catholic Parish in the United States dating from July 26, 1701[Now Mostly Serving the Hispanic Community].[5][6]

The Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Detroit serves as the Archbishop's church. The cathedral is located at 9844 Woodward Avenue in Detroit, Michigan.

History[edit]

Ste. Anne de Détroit, founded in 1701, is the second oldest continuously operating Roman Catholic parish in the United States. The present church was completed in 1887.

Before the Diocese of Detroit was formed, Michigan had been under the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Diocese of Quebec from 1701 until sometime after 1796; de facto American sovereignty was established in that year. At the time, the Diocese of Baltimore encompassed the whole of the United States. Upon the creation of diocesan seats at Bardstown (1808) and later, at Cincinnati (1821), Detroit and Michigan were assigned to those sees. The Diocese of Detroit was formed on March 8, 1833, and its first bishop was Frederick Rese. At this time it covered Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota and the Dakotas to the Missouri River. In 1843 all the territory of the diocese that was not incorporated into the State of Michigan was transferred to the Diocese of Milwaukee.

On July 29, 1853 the Vicarate Apostolic of Upper Michigan was organized, with responsibility for the Upper Peninsula. The territory of the diocese would be further reduced to its current size by the organization of the dioceses of Grand Rapids (1882), Lansing (1937), and shortly after the see was elevated to the status of an archdiocese, Saginaw (1938).[1]

The son of Prussian Polish immigrants, Rev. John A. Lemke, born in Detroit on February 10, 1866, was the first native-born Roman Catholic priest of Polish descent to be ordained in America.[7] He was baptized at St. Mary Roman Catholic Church (1843), at the corner of St. Antoine and Croghan (Monroe St.), on February 18, 1866, attended St. Albertus for his primary education, and studied at Detroit College (now the University of Detroit Mercy), where he received a bachelor's degree in 1884. After attending St. Mary's in Baltimore, he completed his theological studies at St. Francis Seminary in Monroe, Michigan, and he was ordained by Bishop John Samuel Foley in 1889.[7] His added confirmation name was Aloysius.[7]

In January 1989, Cardinal Edmund Szoka implemented a controversial plan to close 30 churches within the city of Detroit. He also ordered 25 other parishes to improve their situation or also face closure.[8] The plan resulted from a five-year study which analyzed maintenance costs, priest availability, parish income and membership before recommending closure of 43 parishes.[9]

The Associationa of Religion Data Archives indicated a Catholic membership in the archdiocese of 907,605.[10]

On May 5, 2011, Archbishop Allen Vigneron announced that Pope Benedict XVI approved his request to name Saint Anne as patroness of Detroit. The Papal decree stated that Saint Anne has been the city's patroness since time immemorial.[11]

On February 21, 2012, Vigneron announced a second plan to consolidate churches to address declining membership and clergy availability within the archdiocese. Under the plan, two parishes will close in 2012 and 60 others will consolidate into 21 parishes by the end of 2013. Six additional parishes were asked to submit a viable plan to repay debt or merge with other churches and the remaining 214 parishes in the archdiocese were asked to submit plans by the end of 2012 to share resources or merge.[12]

Architecture[edit]

Name[13] Image Year Location Style Architect Notes
Academy of the Sacred Heart aka Grosse Pointe Academy GrossePointeAcademy2.JPG 1928 171 Lake Shore Dr., Grosse Pointe
42°23′35″N 82°53′37″W / 42.39306°N 82.89361°W / 42.39306; -82.89361 (Academy of the Sacred Heart)
Tudor Revival William Schickel,
Magginnis and Walsh
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Church Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Church.jpg 1928 13770 Gratiot Ave., Detroit
42°25′40″N 82°58′52″W / 42.42778°N 82.98111°W / 42.42778; -82.98111 (Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Church)
Late Gothic Revival, Renaissance Peter Dederichs, et al. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
Bishop Gallagher Residence Bishop Gallagher residence, Palmer Woods, Detroit.jpg 1925 1880 Wellesley, Detroit
42°26′3″N 83°7′4″W / 42.43417°N 83.11778°W / 42.43417; -83.11778 (Bishop Gallagher Residence)
Tudor Revival McGinnis and Walsh Part of the Palmer Woods Historic District listed on the National Register of Historic Places,[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament, Detroit, MI.jpg 1913 9844 Woodward Ave., Detroit
42°23′17″N 83°5′6″W / 42.38806°N 83.08500°W / 42.38806; -83.08500 (Blessed Sacrement Roman Catholic Church Complex)
Gothic Revival Henry A. Walsh Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
Chapel of St. Theresa-the Little Flower, aka St. Patrick's Chapel of St Theresa St Patrick Church - Detroit Michigan.jpg 1926 58 Parsons St., Detroit
42°20′54″N 83°3′36″W / 42.34833°N 83.06000°W / 42.34833; -83.06000 (Chapel of St. Theresa-the Little Flower, aka St. Patricks)
Late 19th And 20th Century Revivals, Late Victorian, Romanesque Donaldson and Meier Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[14]
Most Holy Redeemer Church Holy Redeemer Church (Detroit) 2.jpg 1922 1721 Junction Ave., Detroit
42°19′2″N 83°6′7″W / 42.31722°N 83.10194°W / 42.31722; -83.10194 (Most Holy Redeemer Church)
Late 19th And 20th Century Revivals, Late Victorian, Romanesque Donaldson and Meier Part of the West Vernor-Junction Historic District listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
Sacred Heart Major Seminary Sacred Heart Major Seminary.jpg 1923 2701 W. Chicago Blvd., Detroit
42°22′27″N 86°6′41″W / 42.37417°N 86.11139°W / 42.37417; -86.11139 (Sacred Heart Major Seminary)
Classical Revival, Late Gothic Revival Donaldson and Meier Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site[13] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church SacredHeartChurch.jpg 1875 1000 Elliot Street, Detroit 42°21′3″N 83°2′47″W / 42.35083°N 83.04639°W / 42.35083; -83.04639 (Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church) Italianate, Romanesque Revival Peter J. Diederichs Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
St. Albertus Roman Catholic Church StAlbertus.jpg 1885 4231 St. Aubin Street, Detroit 42°21′36″N 83°2′31″W / 42.36000°N 83.04194°W / 42.36000; -83.04194 (St. Albertus Roman Catholic Church) Polish Cathedral style Henry Engelbert Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
St. Aloysius Church and Chancery Detroit Washington Blvd.jpg 1924
1930
1234 Washington Boulevard, Detroit
42°19′58″N 83°3′3″W / 42.33278°N 83.05083°W / 42.33278; -83.05083 (St. Aloysious Roman Catholic Church Complex)
Romanesque Revival Donaldson and Meier Part of the Washington Boulevard Historic District listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
St. Anthony Cathedral Abbey Roman Catholic Church 1901 5247 Sheridan Street, Detroit Romanesque Revival Donaldson and Meier Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
Ste. Anne de Detroit Catholic Church St Anne's Church.jpg 1886 1000 Ste. Anne St., Detroit
42°19′14.83″N 83°4′16.16″W / 42.3207861°N 83.0711556°W / 42.3207861; -83.0711556 (Ste. Anne de Detroit Catholic Church)
Classical Revival, Late Gothic Revival Leon Coquard Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
St. Bonaventure Monastery Saint Bonaventure Monastery 1.jpg 1883 1740 Mt. Elliott, Detroit
42°21′4″N 83°0′52″W / 42.35111°N 83.01444°W / 42.35111; -83.01444 (St. Bonaventure Monastery)
Gothic Revival Peter J. Diederichs Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
St. Catherine of Siena Roman Catholic Church St Catherine of Siena Roman Catholic Church.jpg 1929 4151 Seminole, Detroit
42°22′17″N 83°0′23″W / 42.37139°N 83.00639°W / 42.37139; -83.00639 (St. Catherine of Siena Roman Catholic Church)
Romanesque Revival Donaldson and Meier Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
St. Charles Borromeo Roman Catholic Church St Charles Borromeo Roman Catholic Parish Detroit MI.jpg 1912 1515 Baldwin Street, Detroit
42°21′18″N 83°0′7″W / 42.35500°N 83.00194°W / 42.35500; -83.00194 (St. Charles Borromeo Roman Catholic Church)
Late 19th And 20th Century Revivals, Prairie School, Romanesque Van Leyen & Schilling; Peter Dederichs Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
St. Florian Church St Florian Catholic Church - Hamtramck Michigan.jpg 1928 2626 Poland Street, Hamtramck
42°23′39″N 83°3′33″W / 42.39417°N 83.05917°W / 42.39417; -83.05917 (St. Florian Roman Catholic Church Complex)
Late Gothic Revival, Bungalow/Craftsman Ralph Adams Cram Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
St. Hugo in the Hills Catholic Church 1931, 1989 2215 Opdyke Road, Bloomfield Hills Gothic Revival Artur Des Rossiers, Harley Ellington Pierce Yee & Associates
St. Josaphat's Roman Catholic Church StJosephats.jpg 1901 715 E. Canfield Avenue Detroit
42°21′21″N 83°3′10″W / 42.35583°N 83.05278°W / 42.35583; -83.05278 (St. Josaphat's Roman Catholic Church)
Romanesque Revival Joseph G. Kastler, William E. N. Hunter Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
St. Joseph Roman Catholic Church StJosephsRCC.jpg 1870 1828 Jay Street, Detroit
42°20′43″N 83°2′8″W / 42.34528°N 83.03556°W / 42.34528; -83.03556 (St. Joseph Roman Catholic Church)
Late Gothic Revival; German Hall Church Francis G. Himpler; Donaldson and Meier St. Joseph's is an authentic German parish noted for its architecture and stained glass. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
St. Mary Roman Catholic Church StMarysGreektownDetroit.jpg 1875 646 Monroe Street, Detroit
42°20′9″N 83°2′26″W / 42.33583°N 83.04056°W / 42.33583; -83.04056 (Old St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church)
Romanesque Revival Peter J. Dederichs Listed as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
Saints Peter and Paul Church Saints Peter and Paul Church Detroit MI.jpg 1848 629 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit
42°19′55″N 83°2′18″W / 42.33194°N 83.03833°W / 42.33194; -83.03833 (Saints Peter and Paul Church)
Romanesque Revival Francis Letouneau, Peter Kindenkins Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
Saints Peter and Paul Academy, aka St. Patrick Senior Center Sts Peter and Paul Academy - Detroit Michigan.jpg 1892 64 Parsons Street, Detroit
42°20′54″N 83°3′37″W / 42.34833°N 83.06028°W / 42.34833; -83.06028 (Saints Peter and Paul Academy, St. Patrick Senor Center)
Gothic Revival Leon Coquard Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[14]
St. Stanislaus Bishop and Martyr Roman Catholic Church St Stanislaus Roman Catholic Church Detroit.jpg 1900 5818 Dubois, Detroit
42°22′19″N 83°2′49″W / 42.37194°N 83.04694°W / 42.37194; -83.04694 (St. Stanislaus Bishop and Martyr Roman Catholic Church)
Late Gothic Revival, Beaux-Arts, Renaissance Kastler & Hunter, Harry J. Rill Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
St. Theresa of Avila Roman Catholic Church St. Theresa of Avila Church Detroit.jpg 1919 8666 Quincy Ave., Detroit
42°21′49″N 83°7′11″W / 42.36361°N 83.11972°W / 42.36361; -83.11972 (St. Theresa of Avila Roman Catholic Church)
Romanesque Revival Van Leyen, Schilling & Keough, Edward Schilling Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
Saint Paul Catholic Church[15] St. Paul Grosse Pointe.jpg 1899 157 Lake Shore Dr., Grosse Pointe
42°23′41″N 82°53′37″W / 42.39472°N 82.89361°W / 42.39472; -82.89361 (Saint Paul Catholic Church Complex)
French Gothic Harry J. Rill Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]
National Shrine of the Little Flower ShrineoftheLittleFlowerRPC.jpg 1936 1200 West Twelve Mile Road, Royal Oak
42°30′14″N 83°9′26″W / 42.50389°N 83.15722°W / 42.50389; -83.15722 (Shrine of the Little Flower Church Complex)
Art Deco Henry J. McGill Constructed by "Radio Priest" Fr. Charles Coughlin and declared a National Shrine in 1998.
Sweetest Heart of Mary Roman Catholic Church SweetestHeartOfMaryRCC2.jpg 1893 4440 Russell Street, Detroit
42°21′30″N 83°2′52″W / 42.35833°N 83.04778°W / 42.35833; -83.04778 (St. Theresa of Avila Roman Catholic Church)
Gothic Revival Spier and Rohns Detroit's largest Catholic Church designed in a Victorian Gothic Cathedral style. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places[14] and as a Michigan Historic Site.[13]

Leadership[edit]

Ordinaries[edit]

Bishops and Archbishops and their terms of service:

  1. Frederick Rese (1833–1871)
  2. Caspar Borgess (1871–1887)
  3. John Samuel Foley (1888–1918)
  4. Michael Gallagher (July 18, 1918 – January 20, 1937)
  5. Edward Aloysius Cardinal Mooney (May 31, 1937 – October 25, 1958)
  6. John Francis Cardinal Dearden (December 18, 1958 – July 15, 1980)
  7. Edmund Casimir Cardinal Szoka (March 21, 1981 – April 28, 1990)
  8. Adam Joseph Cardinal Maida (June 12, 1990 – January 5, 2009)[16]
  9. Allen Henry Vigneron (January 28, 2009 – present)[17]

Coadjutor bishops (who did not become diocesan bishop)[edit]

Auxiliary Bishops[edit]

Auxiliary Bishop (emeritus)[edit]

Deceased Auxiliary Bishops[edit]

Schools[edit]

See: List of schools in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit

Universities and colleges[edit]

Photo gallery[edit]

Suffragan sees[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Detroit

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Archdiocese of Detroit". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. September 6, 2010. 
  2. ^ "St. Ignatius Parish". Archdiocese of Detroit. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  3. ^ "About the parish". Saint Ignatius Parish. July 17, 2010. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Mission "Sui Iuris" of Cayman Islands". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. January 5, 2009. Retrieved January 21, 2011. 
  5. ^ Woodford, Arthur M. (2001). This is Detroit 1701–2001. Detroit: Wayne State University Press. p. 19. ISBN 0-8143-2914-4. 
  6. ^ Poremba, David Lee (2001). Detroit in Its World Setting (timeline). Detroit: Wayne State University. p. 7. ISBN 0-8143-2870-9. 
  7. ^ a b c Treppa, Alan R. Rev. John A. Lemke: America's First Native Born Roman Catholic Priest.St. Albertus.org. Retrieved on July 25, 2008.
  8. ^ "Cardinal of Detroit Orders 30 Parishes In the City to Close". The New York Times. Associated Press. January 9, 1989. Retrieved April 24, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Detroit Prelate Backs Plan to Close 43 Churches". Los Angeles Times. October 15, 1988. Retrieved April 24, 2012. 
  10. ^ ARDA membership reports for involved countires
  11. ^ Joe Kohn (May 6, 2011). "Saint Anne declared patroness for Church of Detroit". The Michigan Catholic (Archdiocese of Detroit). Retrieved April 24, 2012. 
  12. ^ Orlandar Brand-Williams (February 21, 2012). "31 Catholic parishes face consolidation". The Detroit News. Retrieved April 24, 2012. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Historic sites online.Michigan Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved on December 11, 2007.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x National Register of Historic Places - Michigan: Wayne County. National Park Service. Retrieved on December 12, 2007.
  15. ^ St. Paul Roman Catholic Church Complex. Michigan Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved on December 11, 2007.
  16. ^ "Maida, Adam Joseph". Catholic News Agency. Retrieved May 6, 2011. 
  17. ^ Joe Kohn (February 6, 2009). "Archbishop Vigneron installed as 10th chief shepherd of Detroit diocese". The Michigan Catholic (Archdiocese of Detroit). Retrieved April 24, 2012. 
  18. ^ "Biography of Bishop Francis R. Reiss". Archdiocese of Detroit. August 2003. Retrieved May 5, 2011. 
  19. ^ a b c John T. Greilick (May 5, 2011). "Three auxililiary bishops of Detroit ordained". The Detroit News. Retrieved April 24, 2012. 

References and further reading[edit]

  • Godzak, Roman (2000). Archdiocese of Detroit (Images of America). Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 0-7385-0797-0. 
  • Godzak, Roman (2004). Catholic Churches of Detroit (Images of America). Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 0-7385-3235-5. 
  • Godzak, Roman (2000). Make Straight the Path: A 300 Year Pilgrimage Archdiocese of Detroit. Editions du Signe. ISBN 2-7468-0145-0. 
  • Hill, Eric J. and John Gallagher (2002). AIA Detroit: The American Institute of Architects Guide to Detroit Architecture. Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0-8143-3120-3. 
  • Muller, Herman Joseph (1976). The University of Detroit 1877-1977: A Centennial History. University of Detroit. ASIN B0006CVJ4S. 
  • Tentler, Leslie Woodcock with forward by Edmund Cardinal Szoka (1992). Seasons of Grace: A History of the Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit. Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0-8143-2106-2. 
  • Tutag, Nola Huse with Lucy Hamilton (1988). Discovering Stained Glass in Detroit. Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0-8143-1875-4. 

External links[edit]