St. Bernard, Ohio

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St. Bernard, Ohio
Village
Flag of St. Bernard, Ohio
Flag
Official seal of St. Bernard, Ohio
Seal
Location in Hamilton County and the state of Ohio.
Location in Hamilton County and the state of Ohio.
Detailed map of St. Bernard
Detailed map of St. Bernard
Coordinates: 39°10′4″N 84°29′42″W / 39.16778°N 84.49500°W / 39.16778; -84.49500Coordinates: 39°10′4″N 84°29′42″W / 39.16778°N 84.49500°W / 39.16778; -84.49500
Country United States
State Ohio
County Hamilton
Area[1]
 • Total 1.56 sq mi (4.04 km2)
 • Land 1.55 sq mi (4.01 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation[2] 558 ft (170 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 4,368
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 4,341
 • Density 2,818.1/sq mi (1,088.1/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
FIPS code 39-69470[5]
GNIS feature ID 1045404[2]

St. Bernard is a village[6] in Hamilton County, Ohio, United States. The population was 4,368 at the 2010 census.

Geography[edit]

St. Bernard is located at 39°10′4″N 84°29′42″W / 39.16778°N 84.49500°W / 39.16778; -84.49500 (39.167825, -84.495010),[6] and along with Norwood and Elmwood Place, is an enclave surrounded by the city of Cincinnati.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.56 square miles (4.04 km2), of which, 1.55 square miles (4.01 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[1]

History[edit]

St. Bernard was laid out in 1851 at the intersection of Main Street (now Vine Street, Cincinnati), the Miami and Erie Canal, and the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton Railway.[7] The town was originally built up chiefly by Germans.[8]

St. Bernard was incorporated as a village in 1878.[9]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,022
1890 1,770 73.2%
1900 3,384 91.2%
1910 5,002 47.8%
1920 6,312 26.2%
1930 7,487 18.6%
1940 7,387 −1.3%
1950 7,066 −4.3%
1960 6,778 −4.1%
1970 6,131 −9.5%
1980 5,396 −12.0%
1990 5,344 −1.0%
2000 4,924 −7.9%
2010 4,368 −11.3%
Est. 2012 4,341 −0.6%
Sources:[10][11][12][13][14][5][15]

The median income for a household in the village was $36,114 and the median income for a family was $45,366. Males had a median income of $35,095 versus $26,672 for females. The per capita income for the village was $18,036. About 8.9% of families and 11.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.6% of those under age 18 and 11.8% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 4,368 people, 1,869 households, and 1,090 families residing in the village. The population density was 2,818.1 inhabitants per square mile (1,088.1 /km2). There were 2,128 housing units at an average density of 1,372.9 per square mile (530.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the village was 80.0% White, 15.7% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.9% from other races, and 2.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.9% of the population.

There were 1,869 households of which 29.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.2% were married couples living together, 15.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.7% were non-families. 36.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 3.08.

The median age in the village was 38.2 years. 23.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 10% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.1% were from 25 to 44; 28.2% were from 45 to 64; and 13% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 47.2% male and 52.8% female.

Culture[edit]

Several statues of St. Bernard dogs are located in the town.

The village's largest restaurant is Chili Time, a local Cincinnati chili parlor like many neighborhood establishments in the Cincinnati area.

The village operates the "Dial-A-Ride bus program.[16] The town is home to several clubs and organizations such as the Women's' Club, The R & L Club,The local Eagles Club, Kiwanis Club, and the oldest club in the area the Idle Hour Social Club, founded there in 1913. The Idle Hour Social Club prides itself as the oldest state chartered non profit organization in the State of Ohio.[citation needed]

Education[edit]

St. Bernard has a joint public school district with the neighboring Village of Elmwood Place called the St. Bernard-Elmwood Place Village Schools, allowing both neighborhoods to keep their school separate from Cincinnati schools. The district has three public schools: St. Bernard Elementary, Elmwood Elementary and St. Bernard High School. The athletics mascot of the district is the Titan.

St. Clement Elementary and Roger Bacon High School are also located in St. Bernard.

St. Bernard is served by a branch of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ Varady, Aharon (Nov 1, 2005). Bond Hill: Origin and Transformation of a 19th Century Cincinnati Metro-Suburb. Lulu.com. p. 33. Retrieved 2013-05-22. 
  8. ^ Clarke, S. J. (1912). Cincinnati, the Queen City, 1788-1912, Volume 2. The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company. p. 531. Retrieved 2013-05-20. 
  9. ^ Nelson, S. B. (1894). "History of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Ohio: Their Past and Present, Including...biographies and Portraits of Pioneers and Representative Citizens, etc., Volume 1". p. 425. Retrieved 11 December 2013. 
  10. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  15. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  16. ^ Dial-A-Ride
  17. ^ "St. Bernard Branch". Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. Retrieved 12 June 2014. 

External links[edit]