St. Ignatius of Antioch Church (New York City)

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St. Ignatius of Antioch Episcopal Church
Ignatius Antioch CoE sun jeh.jpg
St. Ignatius of Antioch Church (New York City) is located in New York City
St. Ignatius of Antioch Church (New York City)
Location 552 W. End Ave., New York, New York
Coordinates 40°47′21″N 73°58′38″W / 40.78917°N 73.97722°W / 40.78917; -73.97722Coordinates: 40°47′21″N 73°58′38″W / 40.78917°N 73.97722°W / 40.78917; -73.97722
Area less than one acre
Built 1903
Architect Haight, Charles C.; Cram & Ferguson
Architectural style Late Gothic Revival
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 99001442[1]
Added to NRHP November 30, 1999

St. Ignatius of Antioch Episcopal Church is a historic Episcopal church, located at 552 West End Avenue, on the southeast corner of 87th Street, in Manhattan's Upper West Side neighborhood. It was built in 1903 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.

History[edit]

The congregation was founded in 1871 by the Rev. Dr. Ferdinand C. Ewer, as part of the Anglo-Catholic movement. It first met in the former Holy Light Church (New York City) (a parish for the blind), at 437 Seventh Avenue, then in the former St. Paul's Dutch Reformed Church, located at 54-56 West 40th Street and facing what is now Bryant Park, before erecting the present building.[2]

Architecture[edit]

St. Ignatius' graceful English Gothic building was completed in 1902[3] to designs by architect Charles C. Haight, who also built New York's General Theological Seminary. The cruciform interior is made of Roman brick with a Guastavino tile ceiling.

Music[edit]

The church is particularly noted for the excellence of its professional choir and for its notable concert series.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ http://www.nycago.org/Organs/NYC/html/StIgnatiusAntioch.html
  3. ^ SERVICES IN A NEW EDIFICE.; Opening of St. Ignatius P.E. Church at West End Avenue and West Eighty-seventh Street, New York Times, Oct. 20, 1902, [1]
  4. ^ http://www.polyhymnia-nyc.org

External links[edit]