Talk:Mango

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Contents

Mango removed from Wikipedia:Good articles[edit]

Mango (edit | talk | history | protect | delete | links | watch | logs | views) was formerly listed as a good article, but was removed from the listing because 'Copyvios in prose, see FAC comments and below

Taste?[edit]

The article describes the taste of a ripe mango as being "a cross between a peach and a pineapple," but whenever I eat mangoes, I've always noticed they taste rather "carroty," and not as strongly sweet as that description suggests. This is because they have a lot of keratin in them, isn't it? Has anyone else noticed the same? Albino Bebop 02:12, 7 May 2007 (UTC)

One unregistered contributor today described the taste like a "peppery carrot". I think it's dependent on the species tried, but to me it's more like a cooked tangy sweet potato with a similar texture. Other impressions and attempts to describe the taste? --Paul144 (talk) 04:11, 12 July 2008 (UTC)
Yes, it varies a lot. We have several varieties of mangoes here and each flavor is distinct. Some are extremely sweet with an almost acidic aftertase, some are sweet-sour, some are mildly sweet and reminiscent of melons, etc. The texture itself contributes to the differences in experiences. Some are fibrous, some are hairy, some are soft and melty, some are like firm gelatin, etc. And again it depends on how ripe it was when you eat it. Some varieties like Indian mangoes do taste like sweet peppery carrots when unripe, are fibrous shortly before ripening (like pineapple), and extremely sweet and pulpy when ripe (like peach). Others are sour when unripe (kinda like a cross between tamarind, carrots, and lime).--Astepintooblivion (talk) 14:56, 22 November 2010 (UTC)
Even within varieties taste can vary greatly based on ripeness and exposure to sun. I describe my favorite variety as a cross between pineapple and orange. SChalice 03:31, 26 February 2012 (UTC)

Preparation notes[edit]

What is the justification for repeatedly removing notes about how to prepare a mango? They have been twice removed without comment, even after being shortened. Notes about how to store them for proper ripening were left in; why is preparation so different?


I agree. How to prepare a mango is very important. If you don't know how, you will end up with a mangled mess o' mango! The proper way is fast and easy.

Also, it is important to know that you should not try to bite off the flesh next to the seed. Otherwise, you will get the tough fibers stuck between your teeth. This is not a pleasant feeling, plus it will take a long time to dig them out.

I <3 eating down tothe seed. You don't get fiber teeth if your patient - besides, I rarely dice it 'proper'- instead, cut skin deep in quarters along the vertical axis, leaving the cut stem together to hold the four pieces together. Eventually, I toss the skin and suck on just the seed.


I generally slice it into three pieces. I take the two sides as a bowl and scrape the fruit off with my teeth. Then, I peel off the skin from the seed pit and use my teeth to scrape off the fruit. Best taste is gotten by using this intricate method on a Bombay Mango.

Rasaloo mangos are delicious. However, they are full of fibers and require that you drink the fruit after gently squeezing the fruit while it's intact. Just make a small opening at the stem and drink. Ieopo 05:02, 28 May 2006 (UTC)


This is a great article. The information on preparation was particularly useful. Look, the printed version of the Britannica has limits on page length, so that stuff might be left out of such an article. But not because it isn't relevant or important. There is no such restriction on the web. Leave it in.

194.78.144.226 09:48, 15 December 2006 (UTC) can you just eat magnoes like apples? I have this mango i got fromt he store and i tried cutting it but it's impossible to cut and i don't know if i should just take a bite out of it or what —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.86.194.85 (talk) 23:15, 7 May 2008 (UTC)

Comments[edit]

In case comments are expected:

1) "politely translated" changed to "generally translated" - actually I'm the one being polite in the translation. Generally people in the area call a spade a spade and say "bull's balls" in English.

2) Yea, "nectar from heaven" is a bit much, isn't it?

3) "used in ice cream" - hope people don't think they they can only add it on top; I meant to suggest that crushed mango can be an ingredient in making ice cream

4) Can I eat the skin? It's really good! —Preceding unsigned comment added by 153.2.247.31 (talk) 21:31, 24 January 2008 (UTC)

Health stuff[edit]

I'm removing the "health stuff" section, as it appears to be a copyright violation. The content was taken verbatim from this web page. I've retained the link to nationalpak.com, but moved it down with the other external links. Ortonmc 19:57, 16 Dec 2004 (UTC)

Added an extra paragraph about the taste of the mango, as it didn't seem to be discussed. Maybe it should me moved to a different section? Swamp Ig

White mango - where's it found?[edit]

I've added Manalagi as an Indonesian variety. A white flesh mango in Indonesia, sweet even when it's hard and unripe, and with a flavor quite unlike ordinary mango.

Indonesians I met said it didn't ever go yellow/orange, but that's because it's so prized that it never lasts that long! Actually if you can keep it behind locked doors till it ripens, the flesh develops a pale yellow colour, with darker mottling as if it's going off.

According to this Indonesian local government page it's a variety of M. indica.

Is there more info on this? Where else is it found? Googling told me little. I've only come across it in Indonesia, but I'd like to know where else I could find it. (It's a bit of an obsession, but that's probably obvious!) Singkong2005 13:02, 30 October 2005 (UTC)

As Houseplant[edit]

Is it possible that someone could write about this or add a really good web link? Hannu 19:32, 20 February 2006 (UTC)

I know how to raise a mango from seed, but hesitate to explain in the article because it seems more like material for Wikibooks. Basically (and if anyone deems this encyclopedic, please edit and insert to the article) it's done by piercing the seed with toothpicks to hold it upright in a small bowl of water. Once the seed sprouts it's transplanted to a medium sized plant pot where it grows for a couple of years. After that it's necessary to transplant outdoors, so this approach works only in frost free climates (or for people who tend greenhouses). In my experience it takes around 5-8 years before the tree produces fruit. Durova 15:43, 26 March 2006 (UTC)
I recall speaking with a woman from India years ago who mentioned the practice of cutting a branch from a mature mango tree, bringing it home and I believe rooting it, as a means of obtaining some fresh fruit the same season the cutting is taken. Not exactly a houseplant, but if someone knows about this practice, could you please give some details. For instance, at what stage of fruit development are the branches removed? I believe she was speaking from personal experience with the beloved Alphonso cultivar. It sounds like a means of growing some small quantity of tree ripened mangoes in a small space, perhaps in a crowded city. I believe the process had to be repeated each year, the cutting would produce fruit only once. Zzorse 16:25, 26 March 2006 (UTC)
Don't know if it will satisfy you Hannu, but I added a bit on container mangoes. Here in Miami, Richard Campbelll, of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, has been pushing the "Condo Mango." Personally, I've never fruited a mango in container, but I have two cultivars, 'Carrie' and 'Ice Cream' which are presently loaded with fruit and under 5'.--Snorklefish 20:44, 14 June 2006 (UTC)

Copyvios[edit]

In addition to the large copyvio I noted on the FAC page, I've found more. This is very distressing.

Article text Source text
Mango crops can suffer from several diseases at all stages of its life. All the parts of the plant, such as the trunk, branch, twig, leaf, petiole, flower and fruit are attacked by a number of pathogens including fungi, bacteria and algae. Mango suffers from several diseases at all stages of its life. All the parts of the plant, namely, trunk, branch, twig, leaf, petiole, flower and fruit are attacked by a number of pathogens including fungi, bacteria and algae.[1]
Although domestic consumption has grown dramatically in developed markets in Europe, the United States and eastern Asia, per capita consumption is still low. The European Union has witnessed some of the greatest growth in mango imports, which rose from 17 161 metric tonnes in 1985 to 52 800 metric tonnes in 1993. European acceptance of different cultivars of mango is greater, as there is a large demand from Asian immigrant groups. Phytosanitary restrictions, such as those in place in the United States to prevent importation of fruit flies, are also less stringent in the European Union. Although domestic consumption has grown dramatically in developed markets in Europe, the United States and East Asia, per capita consumption is still low. Yet given the trend toward consumption of exotic fruits, these markets will likely continue to grow. The European Union has witnessed some of the greatest growth in mango imports, which rose from 17 161 MT in 1985 to 52 800 MT in 1993. Although the U.S. import market is nearly twice the size of the European Union import market, Asian producers find expanding sales to the European Union is easier. European acceptance of different varieties is greater, because of a large demand from Asian immigrant groups. Phytosanitary restrictions, such as those in place in the United States to prevent importation of fruit flies, are also less stringent in the European Union.[2]
Mangos also contain an enzyme with properties that are similar to papain found in papayas. These proteolytic enzymes break down proteins and are effective meat tenderizers that are regularly used in tropical countries where mangoes are grown. The enzyme list contains magneferin, katechol oxidase, and lactase. Studies have shown that foods containing phenolic compounds have powerful antioxidant, anticancer, and anticardiovascular abilities. Mangoes possess the phenols quercetin, isoquercitin, astragalin, fisetin, gallic acid, and methylgallat. They contain an enzyme similar to papain in papayas, a soothing digestive aid. These proteolytic enzymes that break down proteins are effective meat tenderizers regularly used in tropical countries where mangoes are grown. The enzyme list continues with magneferin, katechol oxidase, and lactase that not only protect the mango from insects, but help humans by stimulating metabolism and purifying the intestinal tract.
Studies have shown that foods containing phenolic compounds have powerful antioxidant, anticancer, and anticardiovascular abilities. Mangoes possess the phenols quercetin, isoquercitfin, astragalin, fisetin, gallic acid, and methylgallat.[3]
Mango is one of the most recommended fruits to fight beriberi and bronchial diseases. Mango is also an excellent depurative for the organism and it is recommended for nervous people, to fight insomnia, to heal brain fatigue, mental depression and as a laxative. It also has excellent results when used to eliminate kidney sand. A combination of mango and mango leaves can be made to heal molar ache, to affix weak teeth and to eliminate pyorrhoea. This combination is very helpful to reduce the throat inflamation when used for gargling. Mango is one of the most recommended fruits to fight beriberi and to heal bronchial diseases since a mixture of mango pulp and honey can be made at home to fight bronchitis. Mango is an excellent depurative for the organism and it is recommended for nervous people, to fight insomnia, to heal brain fatigue, mental depression and as a laxative, besides it is very helpful to fight heartburn. It has excellent results when used to eliminate kidney sand and to assist digestion. An infusion can be made with mango leaves to heal molar ache, to affix weak teeth and to eliminate pyorrhoea (pus from the gums). This infusion is very helpful to reduce the inflammation of the throat when used for gargling.[4]

Bunchofgrapes (talk) 21:47, 11 March 2006 (UTC)

  • I've removed all these sections. If someone wishes to rewrite them in an acceptable manner, the links to the original materials remain here on the talk page. Some of these seem like quite acceptable sources, but none of them appear to be free for direct copying. Christopher Parham (talk) 03:34, 13 March 2006 (UTC)
Per Wikipedia:Copyright problems I have reverted to 29 January. Today I identified 3 additional copyright violations. Details are posted at Wikipedia:Featured article candidates/Mango. The reversion date was selected because copyright violations identified as the contributions of the editor who nominated this article at FAC. The restored article is the most recent version before that username began editing at this page. Copyright problems were first raised at FAC ten days ago. Durova 09:37, 20 March 2006 (UTC)
I find it rather disturbing that it's possible for a registered user to apparently commit blatant plagarism and get away with it... I'm new round here, so perhaps there's some kind of process that I'm unfamiliar with? Even though the material in question has been removed, it seems rather irresponsible just to carry on as if nothing had happened. Jim whitson 08:59, 20 June 2006 (UTC)
The relevant user talk pages have a record of this. The offending editor hadn't understood copyright law and apologized. Other edits by this user were generally good and the mistake and apology appeared to be genuine. Durova 03:35, 17 October 2006 (UTC)

210.18.107.2 vs. 146.203.53.162[edit]

210.18.107.2 says "The name of the fruit comes from the Tamil word manga"

146.203.53.162 says "The name of the fruit comes from the Malayalam word manga"

Malayalam is the current revision... which is the correct one? Kirbytime 20:33, 12 April 2006 (UTC)

Dictionary.com] says "From Portuguese manga, fruit of the mango tree, from Malay manga, from Tamil mnky : mn, mango tree + ky, fruit." (emphasis mine). "manga Tamil" gives 880,000 hits on google, while "manga Malayalam" gives 175,000, with the first four being pornography. wiktionary says its from Malayalam, but Wikipedia's article on English words of Tamil origin says it's Tamil. I don't speak either language, nor am I familiar with them. Help? Kirbytime 20:46, 12 April 2006 (UTC)

I changed the article to say either Tamil or Malayalam for now. Until consensus is reached here, I think this way is a good compromise. Kirbytime 20:51, 12 April 2006 (UTC)

WP:NPOV makes it clear we should list both possibilities at this point, sure. Why not? —Bunchofgrapes (talk) 17:46, 15 April 2006 (UTC)
Malayalam evolved from Tamil, so the Malayalam word മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa) ultimately derives from whatever the word was in Tamil. --Grammatical error 17:56, 27 April 2006 (UTC)

Mangai (or Mango) is a Tamil word. When Portuguese invaded South India, they borrowed the word from Tamil. Malayalam has nothing to do with this. Since Malayalam itself is child of Tamil. In fact the word Malayalam is a Tamil word. (Malai + Aal) = Malayali (Mountain Person). Malayali speaks Malai naattu Tamil. (Which is Malayalam). Tamil is the only dravidian language. All other languages were descendents of Tamil.

Tamil is not the only Dravidian language, and not all other languages are/were descendants of Tamil. See Dravidian languages.
I would say mango originated from malayalam because the portuguese first arrived in the kerala coast, which is a malayalam speaking area. Their earlier settlements where also in the malayalam speaking west coast, so they could have picked it up from there. And malayalam is definitely not a child of tamil.
A word cannot originate just because Poruguese arrived at Kerala. (Then you should say Mango came from Portuguese.)

In TamilNadu there is Lord Murga's temple at Palani (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palani) where you can see the existance of Mango (Also called as Sacred Fruit of Gods). We are not talking about how it went to Portuguese. We are talking about the root from where it went. Tamil has existance from Stone age. Malayalam is just about 1000 years.

The word for "Mango" in the western Malayo-Polynesian languages (Malay, Tagalog, etc.) is "Mangga" and probably was adopted from one of the south Indian languages as the Malay Archipelago was governed by a large Hindu empire before the arrival of the Arab Muslims and, later, the Christian Dutch, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Mango tree is originally come to from Portugal.It is quite possible that name 'Mango' come from Portuguese 'Manga'.Tamil name 'manga' may come from Portuguese language.Again the ancient of Malayalam is Tamil language. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 117.201.106.68 (talk) 12:19, 5 June 2011 (UTC)

Mango from Maangaai in Tamil[edit]

All this over a mango. :) Well it is widely thought that the word is a derivative from the Tamil word for mango (which is pronounced in a way that leads to different spellings and such). Maangaai is about right. Here are two credible sources that show it comes from Tamil. [5] "In Tamil, the language of Southeastern India, the mango received its original name "mancay or mangay" that later evolved into manga by the Portuguese." and here is another source: [6] Cookie90 16:02, 28 May 2006 (UTC) :)

OED gives it as Tamil by way of Malay, so maybe they're both right! - MPF 21:46, 28 May 2006 (UTC)
lol yes maybe they are. But are you sure it says Malay and not Malayalam? Malay is a different language to Malayalam. Malay is a language of Malaysia whereas Malayalam is a language of India. :) It could be that through early contacts with the North East of Sri Lanka, the Malays from Malaysia came across the Tamil word for Mango, and this eventually was adapted in Portugese. Just speculating. Who knows. Cookie90 11:04, 29 May 2006 (UTC)
Yep, it has Malay, not Malayalam; I'd wondered about that too, but left it as it is in the OED. Whether that's an error on the part of the OED compilers or what, I don't know! - MPF 15:13, 29 May 2006 (UTC)

Well, Portuguese is connected to Tamil, Malayalam, and Malay via Portugal's East Indian empire; Tamil is connected to Malay via the Chola empire; and Tamil is connected to Malayalam on the basis that they are closely related languages in neighbouring territories. Historically, Cochin/Fort Kochi(Malayalam) was in Portuguese hands from 1503 to 1663 and Malacca(Malay) from 1511 to 1641. The Portuguese didn't move into Tamil regions until after opening a fort at Colombo in 1517. So Malayalam seems the most likely origin, but the greater importance and reasonably early founding date of the base at Malacca means that Malay is also quite possible. And of course Malay and Malayalam may still have derived the word from Tamil. (Rwestera 00:40, 29 June 2007 (UTC))

Malay is a relatively new language as compared to ancient languages like Tamil. In fact the Malay language is greatly influenced by Indian languages, namely Sanskrit and Tamil. (An incomplete list of loaned words is available in the Malay language page). Thus I'm pretty sure that the term couldn't have originated from Malay. The Malay version of the word Manga itself is derived from Tamil. Moving on to Malayalam, the language uses many loaned words from Tamil. So if there's similarities, its quite certainly attributed to Tamil. In fact the word 'Malayalam' itself comes from the Tamil words Malai (Mountain) and Ala (People), which ultimately means 'Mountain people (who lived beyond the Western Ghats)'.  S3000  ☎ 15:24, 23 March 2008 (UTC)

Mango in Pakistan[edit]

There appears to be a persistent attempt by one or more editors to add Pakistan to the list of places where mango is native. I've checked all the species listed at the Germplasm Resources Information Network List of Mangifera species, and none are listed as native in Pakistan; the mango is only an introduced cultivated plant there. If it is added to the native area list again, please remove it, unless adequate verification of its native status is also provided. - MPF 16:54, 5 June 2006 (UTC)

I have just checked all the species in Germplasm Resoures Information network List of Mangifera species, and being frank, the 20th specie (Spondias Pinnata) refers to the Native as 'Pakistan' and some other countries. Now there should be no doubt that Pakistan is native country for a specie of mango and 'User MPF' have to recheck the list again before posting another comment. - [TA] 20 June, 2006

This guy MPF is a racist india who should go get a life, and stop insulting Pakistan 86.96.226.90 (talk) 20:28, 12 June 2010 (UTC)

Dont mind 86.96.226.90, (from his contribs) he is in all probability an Indian Gulf Malayali whose is pushing to glorify Pakistan. Arjuncodename024 22:17, 12 June 2010 (UTC)

Ah damn what is wrong with this guy lol, and ur stupid, btw dont u think ur insulting urself by calling me malbari? actually it more like arabian gulf pakistani, not what u said, and one more thing; get a life(both of u), AND also while u do that; go fuck urself!

A new mango image[edit]

I just contributed this image. Do you think it might be worth adding to the page? --Salimfadhley 19:34, 8 June 2006 (UTC)

Mangoes are packed into tough cardboard boxes for export. The fruit ripens during it's long journey, and therefore great care must be taken to prevent it from becoming damaged en route. Alphonso are exported from late April to early June.
I guess it's worth it, but I'm not sure about the last sentence though. And are you sure the "en route" thing is not a typo? I don't know what that means.Chimchar monferno (talk) 01:54, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

"en route" means "on the way". It's french, but is commonly used in English 86.147.51.236 (talk) 21:43, 11 March 2009 (UTC)

Factual Accuracy[edit]

Is the factual accuracy of this article still in dispute? The biggest issue seems to be whether mango is native to Pakistan, and that doesn't seem to merit impugning the entire article.--Snorklefish 20:09, 14 June 2006 (UTC)

Well, there's also the vitally important Tamil/Malayalam issue... HenryFlower 20:15, 14 June 2006 (UTC)

Mangifera indica[edit]

The article begins: "The mango (Mangifera spp.; plural mangos or mangoes) is a genus of about 35 species of tropical fruiting trees..." My question is this... aren't we specifically talking about Mangifera indica. I have never seen the term mango generically applied to all Mangifera. I'd like to change the intro to, e.g., "The mango (Mangifera indica; plural mangos or mangoes) is a tropical fruiting native to India and Southeast Asia. A member of the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae, M. indica is by far the most important commercially of the some 35 members of the genus Mangifera.

Tamil or Malayalam (again!)[edit]

Since both are now supported by reasonably reputable sources, I've amended to mention both Tamil and Malayalam in a hope to stop the ongoing ding-dong - MPF 22:11, 23 June 2006 (UTC)

I'm quite certain the word originated from Tamil. Both languages call the fruit Mangai, but Tamil is an older language and greatly influenced Malayalam. Thus if there are similarities, the source is most commonly attributed to Tamil. In fact the word 'Malayalam' itself comes from the Tamil words Malai (Mountain) and Ala (People), which ultimately means 'Mountain people (who lived beyond the Western Ghats)'.  S3000  ☎ 15:23, 28 March 2008 (UTC)


For the rare person who reads this and wants an education, modern linguists don't think any language is 'older' than any other, all languages changing at a rate of about 500 years / new language. In final analysis, we have found that because we all have homo sapiens-brains, no language is more conservative overall than any other, though some are more conservative at certain times in certain areas.

The way to solve this dilemna from a scientific, instead of alchemist, viewpoint, is to examine historic records for occurences of the word in all relevant languages. Then, using writing system philology and reconstruction, the sounds in the original written occurence can be compared. Sound systems in languages (phonetic inventories) are such that loanwords can be detected on occaision, and a suspected 'original language' is thus posited. For a single word, it's actually a lot of work, but incredibly useful. Even a brief etymology is a microcosm of world history.

However, this method is not perfect and lots of random factors could cause the suspected answer to be wrong. Ideally, scientists would take this into account and also present alternatives. However, the truth is that they usually do not, because humans are stupid and dogmatic, prefering air-tight world-views at the expence of a greater understanding. Nonetheless, though laymen should try, about 25% of the time they will fail miserably, their methods being so primitive compared to academics, whom they generally hold in contempt, again through ignorance. Amateurs should be welcome, but the better ones respect processes they don't yet understand.

Epigraphist (talk) 05:18, 27 September 2009 (UTC)

Production and Consumption[edit]

To me it seems like the text about various methods of eating a mango is excessively long and verbose. I would like to remove most of that specific text and possibly spin it off into a new article because I don't think the detail is appropriate here. Because this is a large amount of text, I would like to solicit some other opinions before doing so. Eberhart 00:56, 26 July 2006 (UTC)

I removed the text. If you disagree with that course of action please leave a note here. Eberhart 19:07, 26 July 2006 (UTC)
Ok, but is the seed edible? 90.191.134.11 (talk) 20:57, 21 March 2014 (UTC)

New Mango[edit]

My friend went to india and saw mangoes called rasalu I added it to the page.it should be added to the cultivars i added it before but someone removed it i even said where they were found in india.

i was just eating haagen-dazs sorbet and on the lid it says that "The sorbet is made from a specific varierty of mango called Criollos (Kre-ol-yo) that grows in Ecuador and Peru. Widely considered the finest mangos in the world, they're celebrated for thier sweet, delicately orange-like flavor."

  • yeah right..."widely considered" by who? Haagen Dazs marketing executives? South Asia has the most cultivars, and some of the best are exquisite.

i wonder if that counts as evidence for a cultivar that wasn't listed

This article isn't the proper place to include all mango cultivars as there are hundreds of mango cultivars. All can, however, be included on List_of_mango_cultivars Eberhart 03:32, 16 August 2006 (UTC)

well someone should add it to that list

origins[edit]

mango origns are around eastern india, burma and bangladesh.Kennethtennyson 21:15, 12 August 2006 (UTC)

Rewrite[edit]

Mango in its most common usage refers to the fruit. The tree has the same name, hence I have modified the opening sentance. I have also restructured the article and shuffled material around. It still has a lot of scope for improvement including more photos.Nandan Kalbag 15:02, 21 October 2006 (UTC)

Leaves not toxic to cattle[edit]

I don't think the leaves are toxic to cattle, seeing as die was made from the urine of cows that were fed only mango leaves. It's illeagal in most places to make this die because feeding cows only mango leaves is not good for them. http://www.plantcultures.org.uk/plants/mango_landing.html Gopherbassist 22:54, 27 October 2006 (UTC)

Our mango tree was eaten by cattle. Sometimes it recovered, but after three dinner sessions the tree was dead.

More copyvio[edit]

Just discovered that the paragraph on 'races' (now deleted; see page history) was a copyvio from www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/mango.html - the whole page should perhaps be checked for any other possible copyvio insertions - MPF 09:32, 6 November 2006 (UTC)

INdian Yellow pigment[edit]

The unique euxanthine pigment produced in the urine of cows fed on mango leaves was used to make Indian Yellow for oil paint till 1908, when the practice was outlawed due to the poor health of the cattle. This is because the leaves also contain a mild poison related to the poison in poison ivy. Many people are allergis to the same substance (see entry on Indian Yellow pigment. Artist. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 150.101.122.132 (talk) 01:12, 10 March 2007 (UTC).

Sorry about the fact tag, I didn't see the ref on the Indian Yellow page, but I've added the ref and made a new ref section on both pages. Latulla 03:27, 10 March 2007 (UTC)

Etymology of mangosteen[edit]

Is the word "mango" related etymologically to the word mangosteen? Badagnani 08:57, 10 June 2007 (UTC)

from the excellent website on the mangosteen, http://mangosteen.com/Sciencenonscienceandnonsense.htm
"The botany of the mangosteen is as follows. The Latin name of the mangosteen is Garcinia mangostana L. The genus Garcinia is named in honor of Laurent Garcin, a French 18th century explorer and plant collector. Linnaeus, the "L" after the species name mangostana, honored his work by naming the genus Garcinia after him. Besides the mangosteen, there are numerous other species within the genus, many of which produce edible fruit but none as exquisite as the mangosteen. Some produce valuable gums, waxes and dyes. I will say that although the word "mango" is contained in the word "mangosteen" there is no relationship botanically. Mangos and mangosteens are not at all related at the genus or family levels, only share several of the same letters." --Paul144 (talk) 15:36, 23 March 2008 (UTC)

Images[edit]

No shortage of images here, but this is a very fine illustration from a double page spread in Curtis's Botanical Magazine. Not a big fan of the circular redirects, by the way. Cygnis insignis 21:03, 8 September 2007 (UTC)

proposed split move[edit]

I propose that the information on the genus be moved to Mangifera, where the botanical info can be explained. The necessarily extensive discussion of a product of those species, the mango, would remain here. This is a solution that has been implemented for other fruits, allowing the conventions at WP:TOL to be followed and having an article with the common name. Any objections? cygnis insignis 15:24, 23 February 2008 (UTC)

I read the article, and I cannot understand why a split would be a good idea. It isn't a long article, and the genus information takes up relatively little space. I think it's good to introduce this bit of science in the article. This is meant to be an encylopedia afterall... - Neparis (talk) 19:48, 24 February 2008 (UTC)
I have should have read it more closely, and I should have read further up, here. The genus taxobox should be moved to Mangifera, the information on the genus and its contained species can be expanded there. The information on the 'mango tree' can be created at Mangifera indica - a species taxobox can be put there. The information on the fruit, the mango, a product of the species Mangifera indica can be expanded here. It is not a case of splitting after all, it is moving facts to appropriately named articles. The three links I have given are three different things. cygnis insignis 07:49, 25 February 2008 (UTC)

I would like to see the split - I came here for info on mango / Mangifera indica. I suggest a page entitled Mango with Mangifera indica redirecting there and a page on the genus and species [Mangifera]].78.151.171.85 (talk) 18:42, 30 September 2008 (UTC)

I would like to see more pictures and information about different varieties of mango - that's what I came here looking for. 78.151.171.85 (talk) 18:43, 30 September 2008 (UTC)

The split will make almost no difference to this article, but it is currently constrained by being an expanation of the fruit and the species. Both are interesting and both will contain a 'bit of science'; the reason for the split is that one is an organism, one is its genus, and this is a product of the whole plant. Extensive info about the different types of mangoes, their uses, and other facts relating to the fruit of Mangifera indica can be expanded upon. cygnis insignis 15:08, 3 October 2008 (UTC)

If mango should be slip, than it might be a good idea to fuse Mangifera indica with one of the splits. --Chris.urs-o (talk) 13:20, 29 January 2009 (UTC)

Plural[edit]

Isn't the plural of mango 'mangoes' not 'mangos'? Sleepysod (talk) 08:56, 17 April 2008 (UTC)

mangi, possibly

I've seen both mangoes and mangos used. Carl.bunderson (talk) 23:23, 19 May 2008 (UTC)
Mangos is the spanish plural. Mangoes is the english plural. Mangi maybe a italian word. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Fev (talkcontribs) 17:24, 15 July 2008 (UTC)

Mango from Malayalam[edit]

The name mango is definitely of Malayalam origin. The Portuguese lead by Vasco da Gama landed in Calicut in 1498 and had later on introduced exotic fruits from Malabar to Europe. Most of the Portuguese trading posts were in Malabar Coast (language Malayalam)for a hundred years. So it is very reasonable to believe that the word 'mango' is from Malayalam and not other languages. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 129.109.98.83 (talk) 16:08, 15 June 2008 (UTC)

Just something to think about: in the languages of the Southeast Asian archipelagos (Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines), Mango had always been referred to as Mangga (pronounced Mang-ga). Note that it couldn't have been an introduced colonial word in these languages because the Philippines was a Spanish colony, and Mango in Spanish is still Mango. Not to mention that the Mango tree is native to Southeast Asia as well. Seems like either the Malayalam word for Mango Manga from Tamil Maan-kaay branched out to Southeast Asia earlier (where it became Mangga, probably along with the spread of Hindusim/Buddhism on the islands as well) than it reached the European languages as Mango, that or the real source for the Malayalam/Tamil name for Mango could have been Southeast Asia (Indian root words for Mango traditionally beginning with Aam or Am, distinctly different). Just musing out loud here. :P Nothing citable LOL. Because SE Asia is the single largest area with a homogenous term for Mango closest to the English word Mango.--Astepintooblivion (talk) 14:46, 22 November 2010 (UTC)


Astepintooblivion: but you do know that South Indian Languages have nothing to do with North Indian indo-european languages that have the word Aam for mango right? and i hope you know that Indonesia, Malaysia etc. were conquered by south Indian empires in ancient times which also took hinduism and budhism there and they all have the similar name for it, hence a Dravidian conquest origin of the name........Also its not native to South East Asian islands....so really just musings nothing much. Also, on another note "curry" is native to Tamil and there is no such word in North Indian languages but English speakers call all north indian foods Curry too. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.26.75.168 (talk) 00:09, 10 September 2011 (UTC)

Changing images[edit]

new descriptive image available.
  • I changed the image on large and small mangoes for the creole mangoes, the previous image gave a wrong idea since both mangoes belonged to the same variety (it was very easy to see this) and the different sizes maybe because of harvesting the small one before complete ripening. We must remember that many mango varieties ripe several days after being harvested. --Fev (talk) 17:33, 15 July 2008 (UTC)
  • New image available. [anon]
No, the big one is sell under a clear chinese name, while the 2 smalls are sell with an other species name (I'm not able to remember their chinese name). I found hundred times the big ones, and the small ones on small and big shops, but always separate, and I never found 'middle size' ones. Two different species, for sure, each being widely sell in Taiwan, but since we are in winter... that's will be hard to confirm right now ;)
Yug (talk) 12:33, 12 December 2008 (UTC)


Mango Flower[edit]

I took this picture of a Mango flower, I'll leave the link. If someone consideres it good enough to replace the one in the article with this one, or simply add it to the article, feel free to do so.

http://art1.server06.sheezyart.com/image/197/1976872.jpg

I release it under Creative Commons and whatnot... —Preceding unsigned comment added by 200.109.42.205 (talk) 23:08, 7 January 2009 (UTC)


Mango Etymology[edit]

Copied form Oxford English Dictionary:

[< Portuguese manga (early 16th cent.), probably < Malayalam manga. Compare Italian manga (1510: see below), mango, Middle French manga (1540), French mangue, mengue (1604), whence the appearance of the last 2 forms in the work cited in quot. 1678 at sense 2. The origin of the -o ending is not clear: Dutch and Spanish mango are < English.

The first recorded attestation of the word in a European language is in the following passage (in Italian) referring to Calicut (Kozhikode):
1510 L. DI VARTHEMA Itin. f. lviiv, Se troua quiui anchora unaltro fructo che se chiama Amba, el pede suo se chiama Manga.
Its first recorded occurrence in certain languages, e.g. post-classical Latin (1511) and French (1540) (both as manga), appears to be in translations of this text. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 129.109.98.97 (talk) 20:20, 31 March 2009 (UTC)

Allergic properties[edit]

I checked the references that allegedly supported the statement that mango peel is edible, and found that two referred only to highly-processed peel extract (one of which was not a credible source) and the third explicitly stated that mango peel contains urushiol oil and can cause severe contact dermititis. I made brief edits to clarify the reference to peel extract, and to explicity mention the dermatitis risk. However, there is no section on mango allergies, yet there are many medical journals that discuss allergic risk from the peel, the pit, the leaves and vines of mango trees, and even mango pollen. I would strongly suggest that a section with further information on allergic properties. The section on "nutrient and antioxidant properties" seems to be dangerously close to non-POV as it relies a great deal on sources from "nutricetical" advocates, yet there is little information in the article about well-documented allergies.

Lower down in the external links section, I changed a broken link regarding mango-related dermatitis to an updated one that leads to a heavily-sourced educational review of peer-reviewed literature on the issue. 76.103.139.109 (talk)


Someone created a sub-section regarding the dermatitis issue which seems a good idea. However, I deleted unsourced statements describing the mango peel as "edible" and stating that properly-washed mangoes were safe for handling. If proper sources can be found for those assertions, they would seem appropriate to include, but the current edit did not show any.76.103.139.109 (talk)


I undid a revert which again inserted unsourced statements. The material I edited did not meet the Wiki standard of verifiability, as no sources have been cited clearly stating that mango peel is edible, or that washing mangoes removes the threat of contact dermatitis. If sources can be found for these statements, please include them. Reverting to a version with unsourced statements without providing any justification for doing so appears to be contradictory to the spirit of the Wikipedia revert policy.76.103.139.109 (talk)

Given that 33 million tons of mangoes are grown and sold into global markets annually, it seems more evident that there is little/no universal problem with contact dermatitis. Rather than the obvious requiring documentation, it would be the obligation of the source stating dermatitis is a common problem to produce a reference confirming it. Accordingly, I am reversing the reversal. --Zefr (talk) 20:31, 29 May 2009 (UTC)


But "it seems evident" is not a verifiable statement. Nowhere in the section does the text make a claim about how often contact dermatitis occurs. All statements in the allergy section are sourced. You are free to go through the literature on mango dermatitis to find a sourced statement about its frequency if you want to include your text. You are also free to go through the literature to find a source to back up the "edible peel" assertion. I would ask you to reconsider your reversion as Wikipedia's verifiability standard is clear. 76.103.139.109 (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 22:08, 29 May 2009 (UTC).
If it helps, here's a report from the Florida Horticultural Society (pdf) from 1967 that says:
"One dark spot in the consumer education and any advertising program is the problem connected
with the allergic reaction of some people in the United States to this fruit. In other tropical
areas where mangos are grown this allergy was not known nor recognized until World War II when
many American servicemen found to their dismay that they developed a dermatitis from contact
with the mango. Research into the problem is in progress and has been for several years in
Florida.
So it's not widespread in areas where mangoes are traditionally grown or consumed. Also, studies like this and this lead me to believe that washing mango peels would be about as effective as washing poison ivy in suppressing allergic reactions. --grant (talk) 17:25, 31 May 2009 (UTC)

A Pubmed search produces only five hits on "mango urushiol" dating back to 1983, the other four during 2004-5. With millions of tons of mango picked and consumed annually worldwide, this would be a more intensively studied topic if it had widespread significance.

Interesting design of a study by Israeli dermatologists who found no urushiol dermatitis in Israeli mango pickers, but, when American pickers previously exposed to poison ivy were used, 17 developed contact dermatitis.[7]

Conclusion: These observations suggest that individuals with known history of poison ivy/oak allergy, or those residing in areas where these plants are common, may develop allergic contact dermatitis from mango on first exposure. We hypothesize that previous oral exposure to urushiol in the local Israeli population might establish immune tolerance to these plants. --Zefr (talk) 21:06, 31 May 2009 (UTC)

Yes, I cited that very article in the text I wrote. If you want to include the exact quote in the reference because you feel it clarifies things, that seems reasonable. In fact, the text I wrote makes no claims about frequency of contact dermatitis, so I'm unclear why you are so strongly objecting.
However, you are still not providing a citation, other than your own hypothesis, for the statements that 1) mango peel is edible, and 2) washing mangos reduces the risk of contact dermatitis. Can you provide such citations? If not, your edits still fail to meet the test of verifiability. 76.103.139.109 (talk)
Zefr, you appear to be engaging in reversions and edits that are not collaborative, and presuming some kind of malice where there is none. I've asked for a third-party editor to look over this page and particularly this sub-section.Drelusis (talk) 06:13, 2 June 2009 (UTC)

Third opinion by Eubulides[edit]

A core principle of Wikipedia is that material which is challenged, or which is likely to be challenged, must be attributed by a reliable source (see WP:BURDEN); otherwise it should be removed. With this in mind, any claim that mango peel is edible, or conversely that mango peel causes contact dermatitis, must be supported by a reliable source, preferably in a peer-reviewed scientific or medical journal. I looked at the sources in the above dispute, as follows:

  • Goldweber 1967 supports the claim that some people in the U.S. develop dermatitis from contact with the mango. The source does not say whether it's the mango peel, though.
  • Dube et al. 2004 (doi:10.1021/jf030792r) is about the allergenicity of mango pulp surviving common manufacturing processes. It's not about the peel, though; nor does it establish that the allergenicity is a problem in practice.
  • Oka et al. 2004 (doi:10.1111/j.0105-1873.2004.00451.x establishes that some people develop allergic contact dermatitis after peeling and eating mangoes, and that allergic reactions can be stimulated by the outer skin (technically, the epicarp) of the mango.
  • Hershko et al. 2005 (PMID 15701120) establishes that allergic reactions to mango can occur after eating the unpeeled fruit, after touching the plant (in particular, the stem), and that there seems to be a connection between poison ivy sensitivity and mango dermatitis. It also contains some speculations which I suppose could be mentioned, but would have to be labeled as speculations.

I don't see anything in these sources to support the claim that mango peel is edible (or that it's inedible), or that washing mangos reduces the risk of contact dermatitis. I do see support for claims that mangos cause contact dermatitis in some people, although none of the sources seem to clearly state that the peel alone is responsible. I did a bit more research on this topic and found the following source:

  • Knödler et al. 2008 (doi:10.1016/j.phytochem.2007.10.013) says "The fruit peels are discarded as a waste. The members of the family Anacardiaceae are known to contain alkyl or alkenyl derivatives of phenol, catechol, and resorcinol. In the case of M. indica, the latter compounds occur in the latex and the fruit peel, while they are absent in the edible parts of the fruit." This is evidence that the peel is not edible.

I hope this helps to resolve the above disagreement. If I can help with any further clarifications please follow up here.

Eubulides (talk) 20:55, 2 June 2009 (UTC)


Fourth opinion by SChalice[edit]

sexy!

- I have been suffering from contact dermatitis with no clue what is causing the problem. I am extremely allergic to poison oak. Lately I have been handling unpeeled mangoes and eating an average of about one a day (Far more than I have ever had in my life). I am going to lay off the mango pie and report back... SChalice 02:30, 25 February 2012 (UTC)


- I stopped eating mangoes 3 days ago. Here is a high cortisol morning picture. It is a milder reaction than I get from poison oak. SChalice 16:44, 25 February 2012 (UTC)


- 6 days without mangoes and it is finally clearing up. This coming after 6 weeks of unrelenting inflammation. I will probably never eat another again. Face-sad.svg SChalice 18:35, 28 February 2012 (UTC)

OED copyright violation[edit]

I recently discovered a couple of sentences lifted directly from the current edition of the OED. Unless this was present unchanged in an uncopyrighted edition, we can't do that sort of thing. Also, it's not necessary in the Mango article to give an exact quotation in Italian from the earliest known use of the word manga in Europe; after all, this is the English Wikipedia entry, not the Italian one. After I removed the seeming violation; it was reinserted by an IP address; I just now removed it again, attempting as best I could to retain all the content (except for that superfluous Italian quote) without copying the form. Furthermore, according the the current OED, the Malayalam word is "māṅṅa", not "manga". Eubulides (talk) 23:25, 8 June 2009 (UTC)

Merge proposal (Chok anan)[edit]

  • Support - As one of the many varieties of the fruit, Chok anan should be included in the main article, along with other varieties. Geoff T C 17:49, 4 July 2009 (UTC)

Citation bot[edit]

75.47.146.56 (talk · contribs · WHOIS) keeps running the Citation bot, but the Citation bot is currently broken and is adding information like ISSNs and months. Can we please leave the Citation bot alone until it gets fixed? Thanks. Eubulides (talk) 21:36, 14 September 2009 (UTC)


Etymology of the word 'mango' [edit]

Although 'no original research' is more of an excuse Wikipedians use to justify petty bullying and institutional power-struggles, the etymology is likely wrong. The Modern Chinese is mang2-guo3, 'hair-fruit', and unless borrowed from English or from a source with greater resemblance than Tamil man-kay, 'mango-fruit'. That this is not the term native to Indian is interesting, but may be due to Chinese influence. One would hope reliable sources like Oxford or American Heritage would get these things right, but I'm sure they make mistakes also.

Epigraphist (talk) 05:06, 27 September 2009 (UTC)

I am skeptical that mango came to English via the Chinese language. However, even if this were true it would not mean that Mango #Etymology is wrong, only that it is incomplete. Obviously any claim that the word comes via the Chinese would need to be supported by a reliable source. The etymology that's currently in the article comes from the OED. Eubulides (talk) 05:59, 27 September 2009 (UTC)

A recent edit inserted the claim that the word mango was probably derived from or "Tamil மாங்காய் (Mangai)", citing page 428 of Skeat WW (1891). Principles of English Etymology. Second Series. The Foreign Element. Oxford: Clarendon. OCLC 10477190.  However, the cited source does not support the claim in question. The source does not say either "மாங்காய்" or "Mangai", and does not say that mango was "probably" derived from Tamil. It merely lists the word "mango" in a Tamil word-list. If the source is supposed to be interpreted as saying that mango was probably derived from Tamil (a dubious interpretation), then the source contradicts itself, as the source also lists the word "mango" in a Malay word-list on the next page. Furthermore, this source is more than 100 years old, and is not nearly as reliable on the subject as the current OED which is based on up-to-date scholarship. Let's stick with reliable sources, please; this isn't one. Eubulides (talk) 17:17, 9 October 2009 (UTC)

Not "man-kay". It's mangah (ah pronounced like 'awe'), or mangai ('ai' pronounced English 'eye'). —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.68.238.142 (talk) 21:20, 8 March 2010 (UTC)

Original research and lower quality source for Mango etymology[edit]

A recent edit made this change:

"The English word mango comes from the Portuguese manga, which is probably derived from the Malayalam മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa) "Tamil" Maanga - மாங்கா <ref>http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=mango </ref>. The Oxford English Dictionary says it is derived from "Malayalam".--> മാങ്ങ (māṅṅa). But Malayalam itself is offshoot of Tamil and the word 'Ma' in Malayalam is Tamil root."

This is an attempt to argue with a highly-respected source (the OED) with a lower quality source (an online amateur website). Furthermore it introduces a lot of original research: the web site does not say "Maanga", or "மாங்கா", or that Malayalam itself is offshoot of Tamil, or that the word 'Ma' in Malayalam is Tamil root, or that any of this is relevant to the etymology of the English word. Nothing in the online web site contradicts what the OED says, and as the online web site doesn't give it's sources it's too weak to rely on here. Please use high-quality sources, and don't use low quality sources and folk etymology in an attempt to undercut what reliable sources say. (For more on this subject, please see WP:PSTS.) For now, I have reverted the change. Eubulides (talk) 22:02, 17 October 2009 (UTC)

Modified article[edit]

Hi I rewrote some parts of the article, especially the food section to clean it up of duplicated information. I also shifted some images to the gallery as I felt the page was bloated with images. Someone please review it. Shekure (talk) 11:00, 29 December 2009 (UTC)

Species?[edit]

The article currently opens as Mangoes belong to the genus Mangifera, consisting of numerous species... but later on contradicts itself, suggesting, like the Mangifera article, as well as some comments on this talk page, that the name applies specifically to Mangifera indica. Which is actually the case? --Paul_012 (talk) 15:20, 16 March 2010 (UTC)

Edited references to Mangifera indica to use the term "common mango". --Paul_012 (talk) 06:49, 21 March 2010 (UTC)

Statistics[edit]

The table of mango production by country sensibly, except for Pakistan, lists the quantities only to round thousands of tons, however the world total is given to the nearest ton, closer than a truck load. One would expect the world tonnage to be greater than those listed for "the main producing" countries but the utterly false precision of the total renders the whole table suspect, even though (or maybe because) it comes from an agency of the UN.--SilasW (talk) 09:58, 8 June 2010 (UTC)

Merge from Mangifera indica[edit]

Currently Mangifera indica is a separate stub article that doesn't really have any information of note that is worthy of its own article. I suggest that it be merged back into here. Are there any objections? howcheng {chat} 16:54, 17 August 2010 (UTC)

The article Mangifera indica is included on the category page for the genus, Category:Mangifera. This article is not. If we simply merge the indica article here, deleting the indica article, then the species most commonly used as food fruit will not have a listing. One could, I suppose, add this article to that category page for the Mangifera genus--and it might not be a bad idea anyway. (I just got through realphabetising that category page.) But this article is about the species within the genus that are commonly called mango, and are used as food fruit. That is primarily indica, yes, but the article does acknowledge that there are others.
This article is listed on the Category:Mangoes page, which is a page for cultivars of mango. I haven't looked at them individually, but I'm guessing they're generally mangos used as food.
I'd be for keeping things the way they are. Maybe someone will flesh out the article on the indifera species. 72.83.149.134 (talk) 10:24, 29 September 2010 (UTC)Stephen Kosciesza
Don't merge. It's a good idea to keep them separate. This article is on the fruit; Mangifera indica is on the taxon. WP:FLORA indicates that this is common practice when a species and its commercial product are two different topics. Rkitko (talk) 19:53, 10 December 2010 (UTC)

File:Apple mango and cross section edit1.jpg to appear as POTD soon[edit]

Hello! This is a note to let the editors of this article know that File:Apple mango and cross section edit1.jpg will be appearing as picture of the day on August 18, 2010. You can view and edit the POTD blurb at Template:POTD/2010-08-18. If this article needs any attention or maintenance, it would be preferable if that could be done before its appearance on the Main Page so Wikipedia doesn't look bad. :) Thanks! howcheng {chat} 17:11, 17 August 2010 (UTC)

Picture of the day
Mango

A whole mango (Mangifera indica) fruit and the cross-section of a second. Mango trees have been cultivated on the Indian subcontinent for thousands of years, and many cultivars are now grown throughout the world in tropical and subtropical climates. The fruit may be eaten raw or cooked and may be ritually used, along with the leaves, as floral decorations at weddings, public celebrations and religious ceremonies.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
ArchiveMore featured pictures...


Etymology again[edit]

The unsourced assertion that it is derived from Tamil has been inserted without even an edit summary again a couple of times today. William Avery (talk) 21:28, 13 October 2010 (UTC)

In Tamil,its called 'Manga', by noways a European would have ever known what Mango is to name it that way. Do a bit of research. 27.57.160.247 (talk) 04:58, 6 November 2010 (UTC)

Merge already[edit]

Any claim that the short article NOT be merged into this are absurd. The other article isn't worthy of existing. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.138.129.142 (talk) 05:46, 27 February 2011 (UTC)

Edit request from Abe2011a, 12 May 2011[edit]


Abe2011a (talk) 09:10, 12 May 2011 (UTC)

Not done: please be more specific about what needs to be changed. Stickee (talk) 12:11, 12 May 2011 (UTC)


Mango walk[edit]

Could the section on cultural significance include reference to the famous calypso song, "Mango Walk"? ACEOREVIVED (talk) 13:48, 4 July 2011 (UTC)


malayalam word for mango is "manga" not manna — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ebymohan (talkcontribs) 21:42, 23 September 2011 (UTC)

File:Mango Powder.JPG Nominated for speedy Deletion[edit]

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Edit request wikify two[edit]

Edit request wikify "panna or panha" to Aam panna — Preceding unsigned comment added by 83.7.195.61 (talk) 07:43, 12 November 2011 (UTC) "Mango Lassi" to Lassi#Mango_lassi, lowercase lassi

Page unlocked, change applied. lol 83.26.88.162 (talk) 01:39, 17 March 2012 (UTC)

Nutrition information[edit]

I was comparing the nutrition information in the article to the data on the USDA website for Mango raw 100 grams. The figures are not matching up. Chango369w (talk) 14:50, 19 November 2011 (UTC)

I edited the existing table according to 2010 nutrient data from the USDA (SR-23), values that were different than those used for the previous table. I provided a web reference so the numbers can be checked. There appears to be a problem in the calculator built into the existing table format, as the DRIs do not check out with my references.--Zefr (talk) 00:32, 30 November 2011 (UTC)

Potential references[edit]

Moved from Further reading section:

--Ronz (talk) 03:13, 29 December 2011 (UTC)


Thank you for your opinion and suggestion.

This review is meant for readers who would like to delve deeper into the subject.

The review is placed in the “further reading” – section because the Wikipedia guideline for this section read: “… publications that would help interested readers learn more about the article subject. The Further reading section (…) should normally not duplicate the content of the References section” (WP:FURTHER).

The Wikipedia content guideline for “Identifying reliable sources (medicine)” (WP:MEDRS) read: “It is usually best to use reviews and meta-analyses where possible.”

The review in question reflect the latest research (last 10 years) in the field, it is scholarly and peer-reviewed, and it is published in an academic journal. Granateple (talk) 13:32, 29 December 2011 (UTC)

Make better[edit]

I love mangos. Can someone show me how to make this article better? — Preceding unsigned comment added by MangoMania69 (talkcontribs) 00:58, 7 February 2012 (UTC)

Half of all tropical fruits?[edit]

I wish this statistic had a cited source. What is and isn't included as a tropical fruit? Are bananas included? --98.114.176.218 (talk) 03:52, 24 March 2012 (UTC)

"Half of..." needs to be removed or improved. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.81.210.58 (talk) 01:44, 5 February 2013 (UTC)

It's ambiguous and unsourced, and I have removed it. Rivertorch (talk) 06:25, 5 February 2013 (UTC)

Edit request on 4 June 2012[edit]

I want to add the details about Salem, the mago city to this page

Vinothpraba (talk) 01:48, 4 June 2012 (UTC)

Not done for now: You need to be very specific about what you want to add. Please provide the exact wording of your proposed addition. (Btw, I assume you're aware this article is about the mango, a type of fruit.) Rivertorch (talk) 06:03, 4 June 2012 (UTC)

Co-evolution section[edit]

Because elephants seek out and eat mangos in both Africa and Southeast Asia, it is untrue to state that no animal is large enough to eat them and disperse their seeds. 173.11.183.118 (talk) 14:23, 16 August 2012 (UTC)

The wording was actually "no extant large mammal", and mangoes aren't native to Africa, but your essential point remains. Judging from the second of the two sources cited (which supports what you say), it looks as if mangoes and avocados may have taken different paths to evolve into somewhat similar fruits. Perhaps something of the section is salvageable, but in the meantime I've removed the entire section (earlier removed by another editor who didn't use an edit summary). Rivertorch (talk) 18:48, 16 August 2012 (UTC)

Nectar[edit]

This page refers to mango nectar without describing what that is, and the word nectar is linked to the Nectar page, which does not cover this particular meaning of the word. 222.153.146.199 (talk) 04:13, 3 March 2013 (UTC)

The Mango by R. Litz[edit]

The Mango: Botany, Production and Uses by R. Litz, which is currently in the "Further reading" section can be used as a reference here. It seems good but is too vast for me, anybody think this is a good idea and is willing to expand this article using it? Thanks, Ugog Nizdast (talk) 12:22, 5 September 2013 (UTC)

More possibly useful sources[edit]

After some moderate amount of digging, I've come across these. Hope they are useful.

Ugog Nizdast (talk) 14:41, 5 September 2013 (UTC)

Mango cultivar AfD[edit]

Totapuri mango has been nominated for deletion, so I'm bringing it here to get the attention of mango editors. First Light (talk) 16:45, 8 December 2013 (UTC)

Mango tree's production of natural herbicide[edit]

I have not found any reference concerning this phenomena. I grew up in Miami, Florida. Mango trees were common. There were three large and productive trees in both neighbor's yard. No grass or weeds, nor any other vegetation grew underneath them. The leaf stems were red, the flowers red stemmed with gold florets and the foliage was a deep dark green, not bad ornamentally. One of them was in the front of the house and it would have helped the curb appeal if some vegetation could have grown underneath them.

I would like to know if there are some plants that can survive the shade and whatever else the tree does that discourages other plants. Thank you, billkopp@rcn.com

Mango tree's production of natural herbicide[edit]

I have not found any reference concerning this phenomena. I grew up in Miami, Florida. Mango trees were common. There were three large and productive trees in both neighbor's yards. No grass or weeds, nor any other vegetation grew underneath them. The leaf stems were red, the flowers red stemmed with gold florets and the foliage was a deep dark green, not bad ornamentally. One of them was in the front of the house and it would have helped the curb appeal if some vegetation could have grown underneath them.

I would like to know if there are some plants that can survive the shade and whatever else the tree does that discourages other plants. Thank you, billkopp@rcn.com — Preceding unsigned comment added by 207.38.181.157 (talk) 16:55, 22 February 2014 (UTC)

Mango tree's production of natural herbicide[edit]

I have not found any reference concerning this phenomena. I grew up in Miami, Florida. Mango trees were common. There were three large and productive trees in both neighbor's yards. No grass or weeds, nor any other vegetation grew underneath them. The leaf stems were red, the flowers red stemmed with gold florets and the foliage was a deep dark green, not bad ornamentally. One of them was in the front of the house and it would have helped the curb appeal if some vegetation could have grown underneath them.

I would like to know if there are some plants that can survive the shade and whatever else the tree does that discourages other plants. Thank you, billkopp@rcn.com

Mango tree's production of natural herbicide[edit]

I have not found any reference concerning this phenomena. I grew up in Miami, Florida. Mango trees were common. There were three large and productive trees in both neighbor's yards. No grass or weeds, nor any other vegetation grew underneath them. The leaf stems were red, the flowers red stemmed with gold florets and the foliage was a deep dark green, not bad ornamentally. One of them was in the front of the house and it would have helped the curb appeal if some vegetation could have grown underneath them.

I would like to know if there are some plants that can survive the shade and whatever else the tree does that discourages other plants. Thank you, billkopp@rcn.com — Preceding unsigned comment added by 207.38.181.157 (talk) 16:57, 22 February 2014 (UTC)

Etymology[edit]

The word "Manga" is common to all Dravidian languages including Malayalam. The Portuguese must have first heard the name in Kerala where they reached India first. There is absolutely no pint in arguing about this matter. Oxford English dictionary gave correct picture.Kumarrao (talk) 09:08, 13 April 2014 (UTC)

It may not be quite that simple. Here's what various major dictionaries have to say:

Oxford:
From Portuguese manga, from a Dravidian language.

Random House:
1575–85;  < Portuguese manga,  probably < Malayalam māṅṅa

Collins:
via Portuguese from Malay mangā,  from Tamil mānkāy  frommān  mango tree + kāy  fruit]

Merriam-Webster:
Portuguese manga, probably from Malayalam māṅṅa. First Known Use: 1582

AHD:
From Portuguese manga, fruit of the mango tree, from Malayalam māṅṅa or a kindred Dravidian source; akin to Tamil mā, mānti, māti.

Chambers:
16c: from Portuguese manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil man-kay mango-fruit.

Webster's New World:
Portuguese manga ; from Malay maṅga ; from Tamil mān-kāy ; from mān, mango tree + kāy, fruit

Online Etymology Dictionary:
1582, from Port. manga, from Malay mangga, from Tamil mankay, from man "mango tree" + kay "fruit."

Now, you may be absolutely correct that the Portuguese heard the name first in Kerala, but at the moment that's original research unless you can provide a source. My guess is that there are numerous cognates in a whole bunch of languages throughout the mango-growing world, and that the ultimate origin is unclear. Anyhow, while Malayalam and Tamil are both Dravidian languages, Malay is not, and multiple reliable sources expressly mention one or more of the three; only Oxford remains so vague. While their vagueness may be admirable, I don't think we should ignore what the others say. Rivertorch (talk) 14:21, 13 April 2014 (UTC)
Ludovico Di Varthema clearly says about mango that it is found in Kerala.But the name he says is amba which has more in common with aam in Hindi and Sanskrit.Later the Portuguese came to Malabar and introduced Mango and other words to Portuguese.The Malay word for Mango is also Manga but it was from South India, mangoes went to the Malayan Archipelago.The word Mango was introduced first at the 1580 when the west had only links with Kerala.If it is not a sufficient evidence for you, you can check here[1][2]Amalshaji27 (talk) 18:45, 13 April 2014 (UTC)
Malayalam branched off from Proto-Tamil-Malayalam and evolved as as a full fledged language only in 13th century (Caldwell, Robert (1875). http://books.google.com/books?id=oG0IAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA18&dq=malayalam+language+origin#PPR3,M1). As several citations mentioned above include both Tamil and Malayalam, it is safe to mention Dravidian language as the sourceKumarrao (talk) 14:54, 14 April 2014 (UTC).
As you have said,Malayalam did not branch from Proto-Tamil-Malayalam in 13th century. It happened earlier ie 6th or 7th century. The event mentioned here happened on 16th century and at that time, Malayalam have far long been a full fledged language.Amalshaji27 (talk) 16:50, 16 April 2014 (UTC).

Urushiol in Mangos[edit]

Is there really truly any Urushiol in Mangos? If so, in which parts? What is your proof/evidence?

The "Potential for contact dermatitis" section of the Mango article is a confusing mess! This sentence is particularly confusing: "Urushiol is also present in mango leaves and stems." What is the word "also" doing in this sentence? What is the reliable source -- how do we know that Urushiol is in leaves/stems vs. other parts?

Having read everything readily available here, it is clear that various parts of mangos contain an oil which is Urushiol-like and that some poison-ivy sensitve people react to. It is completely unclear which parts, if any, actually contain Urushiol. It seems like a fair next step to remove any related claims about the presence of Urushiol from the Mango article, until someone comes forward with credible, specific sources? -96.233.24.251 (talk) 20:26, 18 May 2014 (UTC)

Well, I cannot remove the problem sentence, because the article is locked for IP edits. So, the ball is in YOUR court! -96.233.24.251 (talk) 20:39, 18 May 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 23 October 2014[edit]

Mango is a tropical fruit, but it can be grown up to 1,100m above mean sea level. There should not be high humidity, rain or frost during flowering. The temperature between 24 and 27`C is ideal for its cultivation. Higher temperature during fruit development and maturity gives better quality fruits. The areas experiencing frequent showers and high humidity are prone to many pests and diseases. Thus it can be grown best in regions with a rainfall between 25 cm and 250cm. Regions having bright sunny days and moderate humidity during flowering are ideal for mango growing. City of Mangoes, Krishnagiri, located in the state of Tamil Nadu is a small city and an extremely fertile region generally known for its agricultural practices. Nestled beautifully at the distance of 90 kms from Bangalore and 45 kms from Hosur, Krishnagiri is a popular tourist spot in Southern India. The city is widely known for its Krishnagiri Dam, which is one of the primary attractions of the place and draws a large number of tourists round the year. Due to the existence of numerous archaeological sites, Krishnagiri is believed to be one of the oldest colonized places in the country. Krishnagiri travel guide is full of references to the historical significance. Krishnagiri was ruled by the Kongu Nadu Kings and Chola Kings. Their influences can be seen even today here. Other dynasties that ruled the town were Pandas, Cholas, Nulambas, Cheras and Bijapur empires. The evidences during the Iron Age can be seen in the city. Cultivation of Mangoes, the national fruit of India is the major source of income of the people of the Tamil Nadu. The major crop of Krishnagiri district with 300 sq. km area of farming is Mango. The district produces around 300,000 tons on an annual basis. A lot of mango varieties like 'Alphonso' and 'Thothapuri' are produced in this district. Krishnagiri also hosts an Annual Exhibition of Mangoes at New Delhi. Many delicious varieties of mangoes are exhibited during the festival Saravanandhayalan (talk) 05:10, 23 October 2014 (UTC)

Red question icon with gradient background.svg Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format. Stickee (talk) 05:38, 23 October 2014 (UTC)

origin not pakistan[edit]

see this link : http://www.horticultureworld.net/botany-taxonomy.htm

culture & ancient record[edit]

add these info into page :http://www.themangofactory.com/history/mango-history-2/

http://mango-trees.blogspot.in/2009/10/history-and-origin-of-mango.html

http://www.quora.com/Why-are-banana-or-mango-leaves-used-a-lot-in-Hindu-religious-events

  1. ^ http://books.google.co.in/books?id=3qk-p5hKuccC&pg=PA211&dq=mango+portuguese+malabar
  2. ^ ooks.google.co.in/books?id=MAcVAAAAQAAJ&pg=PR21&dq=The+Itinerary+of+Ludovico+Di+Varthema