West Low German

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West Low German
Native to Germany, Netherlands, Denmark
Native speakers
4 million  (date missing)[citation needed]
Language codes
ISO 639-2 nds
ISO 639-3 Variously:
wep – Westphalian
nds – (partial)
frs – Eastern Frisian
gos – Gronings
stl – Stellingwerfs
drt – Drents
twd – Twents
act – Achterhoeks
sdz – Sallands
vel – Veluws
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Low Saxon language area

West Low German, also known as Low Saxon (German: Niedersächsisch, Dutch: Nedersaksisch), is a group of dialects spoken in the northwest of Germany and adjacent territories of The Netherlands and Denmark. Together with East Low German it forms the Low German dialect group (German: Niederdeutsch or Plattdeutsch, Dutch: Nederduits).

Extent[edit]

The language area comprises the North German states of Lower Saxony, North Rhine-Westphalia (the Westphalian part), Bremen, Hamburg, Schleswig-Holstein and Saxony-Anhalt (the northwestern areas around Magdeburg) as well as the northeast of The Netherlands (i.e. Dutch Low Saxon, spoken in Groningen, Drenthe, Overijssel and northern Gelderland) and the Schleswigsch dialect spoken by the North Schleswig Germans in the southernmost part of Denmark.

In the south the Benrath line and Uerdingen line isoglosses form the border with the area, where West Central German variants of High German are spoken.

List of dialects[edit]

Germany[edit]

Low Saxon language area in the Netherlands

The Netherlands[edit]

Main article: Dutch Low Saxon

While Dutch is classified as a Low Franconian language, the Dutch Low Saxon varieties, which are also defined as Dutch dialects, form a dialect continuum with the Westphalian language. They consist of:

Denmark[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Noble, Cecil A. M. (1983). Modern German dialects New York [u.a.], Lang, p. 103-104
  2. ^ Noble, Cecil A. M. (1983). Modern German dialects New York [u.a.], Lang, p. 103-104
  3. ^ Noble, Cecil A. M. (1983). Modern German dialects New York [u.a.], Lang, p. 103-104
  4. ^ Noble, Cecil A. M. (1983). Modern German dialects New York [u.a.], Lang, p. 103-104
  5. ^ Noble, Cecil A. M. (1983). Modern German dialects New York [u.a.], Lang, p. 103-104
  6. ^ Noble, Cecil A. M. (1983). Modern German dialects New York [u.a.], Lang, p. 103-104
  7. ^ Noble, Cecil A. M. (1983). Modern German dialects New York [u.a.], Lang, p. 103-104