1941 Michigan Wolverines football team

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1941 Michigan Wolverines football
Conference Big Ten Conference
Ranking
AP No. 5
1941 record 6–1–1 (3–1–1 Big Ten)
Head coach Fritz Crisler (4th year)
Offensive scheme Single-wing formation
MVP Reuben Kelto
Captain Bob Westfall
Home stadium Michigan Stadium
Seasons
« 1940 1942 »
1941 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#1 Minnesota $ 5 0 0     8 0 0
#5 Michigan 3 1 1     6 1 1
#13 Ohio State 3 1 1     6 1 1
#11 Northwestern 4 2 0     5 3 0
Wisconsin 3 3 0     3 5 0
Iowa 2 4 0     3 5 0
Purdue 1 3 0     2 5 1
Indiana 1 3 0     2 6 0
Illinois 0 5 0     2 6 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1941 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1941 college football season. Under fourth-year head coach Fritz Crisler, Michigan compiled a record of 6–1–1 (3–1–1 Big Ten), outscored opponents 147 to 41 and was ranked #5 in the final AP Poll.[1] The team played three ranked opponents, defeating #5 Northwestern (14–7), playing to a tie with #14 Ohio State (20–20), and losing by a 7–0 score to the 1941 Minnesota team that won the 1941 national championship.[1] With a strong, veteran line, the Wolverines also shut out four of their eight opponents: Pittsburgh (40–0); Columbia (28–0); Illinois (20–0); and Iowa (6–0).[1]

Fullback Bob Westfall was selected as a consensus first-team player on both the 1941 College Football All-America Team and the All-Big Ten Conference team. Halfback Tom Kuzma was the team's leading scorer with 48 points, and tackle Reuben Kelto received the team's Most Valuable Player award. Tackle Al Wistert received second-team All-America honors, and center Robert Ingalls was selected as a first-team All-Big Ten honoree.

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
September 27 Michigan State* Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI (Rivalry) W 19–7   66,389
October 4 Iowa Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 6–0   29,807
October 11 Pittsburgh* Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 40–0   33,848
October 18 at No. 5 Northwestern No. 6 Dyche StadiumEvanston, IL W 14–7   43,264
October 25 No. 1 Minnesotadagger No. 3 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (Little Brown Jug) L 0–7   84,658
November 1 at Illinois No. 7 Memorial StadiumChampaign, IL (Series) W 20–0   31,554
November 15 at Columbia* No. 7 Baker FieldNew York, NY W 28–0   31,181
November 22 No. 14 Ohio State No. 7 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (Rivalry) T 20–20   84,581
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game. All times are in Eastern Time.

Season summary[edit]

Pre-season[edit]

The 1940 Michigan Wolverines football team had compiled a 7–1 and was ranked #3 in the final AP Poll.[2] Michigan's coaching staff remained largely intact in 1941, with head coach Fritz Crisler returning for his fourth season and taking on an added role as athletic director following the retirement of Fielding H. Yost.[3]

From the 1940 team, the Wolverines lost five key starters to graduation: halfback Tom Harmon, quarterback Forest Evashevski, end Ed Frutig and guards Ralph Fritz and Milo Sukup.[2][4] In addition, halfback Cliff Wise was lost to the military draft,[4] and several other players from the 1940 team were lost when they voluntarily enlisted in the military. Michigan's enlistees included halfback Bob Krejsa, fullback Bob Zimmerman, and tackle Jack Butler.[5] Key veterans returning from the 1940 team included fullback and senior team captain, Bob Westfall, who was the nation's fourth leading rusher during the 1940 college football season with 807 net rushing yards.[6] Michigan also returned several veteran linemen, including starting center Robert Ingalls and tackles Al Wistert and Reuben Kelto.[1][2]

In an article published in mid-September, coach Crisler predicted that Michigan's outlook for another superior team was dim.[4] Michigan's biggest task in the pre-season was to find a player to take on the tailback position that had been filled by Tom Harmon from 1938 to 1940.[3][4] As fall practice got underway, the leading prospects to take over Harmon's position included the following individuals: Tom Kuzma, a sophomore and a native of Harmon's home town of Gary, Indiana; David M. Nelson, who was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach; Paul White, who later played for the Pittsburgh Steelers; Don Robinson, who served as a heavy bomber pilot in World War II; and Harold "Tippy" Lockard, a junior from Canton, Ohio, who enlisted in the Army Air Corps after the attack on Pearl Harbor.[4][7][8] Despite receiving an invitation from coach Crisler,[3] sophomore track star Bob Ufer, who had played halfback in high school, did not report to the football team, opting instead to focus on track.[9]

Week 1: Michigan State[edit]

Week 1: Michigan State at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan State 7 0 0 0 7
Michigan 0 7 12 0 19

On September 27, 1941, Michigan defeated Michigan State by a 19 to 7 score. The game was Michigan's first without Tom Harmon, who had led the Wolverines from 1938 to 1940. Sophomore tailback Tom Kuzma, from Harmon's home town of Gary, Indiana, took over Harmon's spot and scored two touchdowns in his first game for the Wolverines. Michigan State took the lead on the third play from scrimmage with a 74-yard sweep around left end by halfback Jack Fenton. Michigan came back with a touchdown in the second quarter and two more in the third quarter. In addition to Kuzma's two touchdowns, fullback Bob Westfall also scored on a one-yard run in the third quarter. Robert Ingalls kicked for one point after touchdown for Michigan. Michigan out-gained Michigan State on the ground with 235 rushing yards to 104 for the Spartans. Wilfrid Smith of the Chicago Tribune wrote that the key to Michigan's victory was the its veteran line that "completely outplayed" the Spartans' line.[10][11]

Michigan's starting lineup against Michigan State was Harlin Fraumann (left end), Al Wistert (left tackle), Robert Kolesar (left guard), Ingalls (center), Bill Melzow (right guard), Reuben Kelto (right tackle), Joe Rogers (right end), George Ceithaml (quarterback), David M. Nelson (left halfback), Harold "Tippy" Lockard (right halfback), and Westfall (fullback).[10]

Week 2: Iowa[edit]

Week 2: Iowa at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Iowa 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 6 0 0 0 6

On October 4, 1941, Michigan defeated Iowa by a 6 to 0 score. The game's only points were scored in the first quarter after sophomore halfback Tom Kuzma returned a punt 22 yards, supported by a key block from quarterback George Ceithaml, to Iowa's 18-yard line. Kuzma thereafter scored the touchdown on a three-yard run, and Bill Melzow missed the kick for point after touchdown.[12][13]

Michigan's starting lineup against Iowa was Harlin Fraumann (left end), Al Wistert (left tackle), Robert Kolesar (left guard), Robert Ingalls (center), Melzow (right guard), Reuben Kelto (right tackle), Joe Rogers (right end), Ceithaml (quarterback), Kuzma (left halfback), Harold "Tippy" Lockard (right halfback), and Bob Westfall (fullback).[12]

Week 3: Pittsburgh[edit]

Week 3: Pittsburgh at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Pitt 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 6 0 14 20 40

On October 11, 1941, Michigan defeated Pitt by a 40 to 0 score. The game was the first played between the two programs.[14][15] Michigan's six touchdowns, five of them in the second half, were scored by Harold "Tippy" Lockard, Tom Kuzma (two touchdowns, including a 48-yard punt return), Donald Boor, Don Robinson, and David M. Nelson. Points after touchdown were kicked by Robert Ingalls (2) and William Melzow (2).[16] Pitt never advanced beyond Michigan's 35-yard line in the game.[15] Michigan outgained Pitt on the ground 274 yards to 27 yards. The New York Times wrote: "A powerhouse line, impregnable on the defense and a juggernaut on the offense; an abundance of ball-carriers who possessed speed, force and deception, plus the knowledge of how and when to employ these weapons, stamped Michigan's superiority throughout."[15]

Michigan's starting lineup against Pitt was Harlin Fraumann (left end), Al Wistert (left tackle), Robert Kolesar (left guard), Ingalls (center), Merv Pregulman (right guard), Reuben Kelto (right tackle), Joe Rogers (right end), George Ceithaml (quarterback), Kuzma (left halfback), Lockard (right halfback), and Bob Westfall (fullback).[16]

Week 4: at Northwestern[edit]

Week 4: Michigan at Northwestern
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 7 0 0 7 14
Northwestern 0 7 0 0 7

On October 18, 1941, Michigan defeated Wildcats by a 14 to 7 score. Both Michigan touchdowns came on passes from halfback Tom Kuzma. The first touchdown pass, in the first quarter, came on a 78-yard drive led by the running of fullback Bob Westfall. The touchdown was scored on a trick play as Westfall faked a run from Northwestern's 10-yard line, handed the ball to quarterback George Ceithaml who then lateraled the ball to halfback Tom Kuzma who threw to end Harlin Fraumann in the end zone. The second touchdown pass, in the fourth quarter, covered 47 yards, with end Joe Rogers running the final 32 yards after making the reception. Bill Melzow kicked both points after touchdown for the Wolverines. Northwestern's touchdown was scored on a three-yard run by Otto Graham in the second quarter. Michigan was out-gained both on the ground (169 to 128) and in the air (197 to 73), but held Northwestern to a single touchdown.[17][18]

Michigan's starting lineup against Northwestern was Fraumann (left end), Al Wistert (left tackle), Robert Kolesar (left guard), Robert Ingalls (center), Merv Pregulman (right guard), Reuben Kelto (right tackle), Rogers (right end), Ceithaml (quarterback), Kuzma (left halfback), Harold "Tippy" Lockard (right halfback), and Westfall (fullback).[17]

Week 5: Minnesota[edit]

Week 5: Minnesota at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Minnesota 0 7 0 0 7
Michigan 0 0 0 00 0

On October 25, 1941, Michigan, ranked #3 in the AP Poll, played Minnesota, ranked #1 in the country. Minnesota won the game by a 7 to 0 score on a five-yard touchdown run by halfback Herman Frickey in the second quarter. The touchdown was set up by a 78-yard punt and a 43-yard pass, both by 1941 Heisman Trophy winner Bruce Smith. Minnesota gained 179 rushing yards in the game, while Michigan tallied 135 rushing yards. In the fourth quarter, Michigan twice drove deep into Minnesota territory, but both drives ended with pass interceptions by Minnesota's quarterback Bill Garnaas. The loss was the eighth in a row for the Wolverines against the Golden Gophers. The crowd of 85,753 at Michigan Stadium was the largest to that date to see a football game between two Big Nine Conference teams.[19][20]

Michigan's starting lineup against Minnesota was Harlin Fraumann (left end), Al Wistert (left tackle), Robert Kolesar (left guard), Robert Ingalls (center), Merv Pregulman (right guard), Reuben Kelto (right tackle), Joe Rogers (right end), George Ceithaml (quarterback), Tom Kuzma (left halfback), Harold "Tippy" Lockard (right halfback), and Bob Westfall (fullback).[19]

Week 6: at Illinois[edit]

Week 6: Michigan at Illinois
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 7 6 0 7 20
Illinois 0 0 0 0 0

On November 1, 1941, Michigan played on the road and defeated Illinois by a 20 to 0 score. The game, played in cold, windy weather, featured 13 fumbles, seven by Michigan and six by Illinois. Two of Michigan's touchdowns were scored by fullback Bob Westfall, and the third was scored by halfback Tom Kuzma. William Melzow kicked two points after touchdown and missed on a third attempt. Kuzma rushed for 121 yards on 21 carries, and Westfall carried 26 times for 126 rushing yards. In all, the Wolverines out-gained the Illini on the ground 327 yards to 91 yards.[21][22]

Michigan's starting lineup against Columbia was Harlin Fraumann (left end), Al Wistert (left tackle), Robert Kolesar (left guard), Robert Ingalls (center), Merv Pregulman (right guard), Reuben Kelto (right tackle), Rudy Smeja (right end), George Ceithaml (quarterback), Kuzma (left halfback), Paul White (right halfback), and Westfall (fullback).[21]

Week 7: at Columbia[edit]

Week 7: Michigan at Columbia
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 14 7 7 0 28
Columbia 0 0 0 0 0

On November 15, 1941, Michigan traveled to New York City and defeated Columbia by a 28 to 0 score. Three of Michigan's four touchdowns were scored by fullback Bob Westfall, and the fourth was scored by halfback Tom Kuzma. All four points after touchdown were kicked by William Melzow.[23] Michigan outgained Columbia on the ground 359 yards to 33 yards. Allison Danzig of The New York Times described Michigan's performance as "butchery" and "a horrendous outpouring of volcanic power" featuring bewildering trickery, "explosive running" and "obliterating blocking", and praised the Wolverines as "one of the greatest football teams ever turned loose" on Columbia's field.[24]

Michigan's starting lineup against Columbia was Harlin Fraumann (left end), Al Wistert (left tackle), Robert Kolesar (left guard), Robert Ingalls (center), Merv Pregulman (right guard), Reuben Kelto (right tackle), Philip Sharpe (right end), George Ceithaml (quarterback), Kuzma (left halfback), Paul White (right halfback), and Westfall (fullback).[23]

Week 8: Ohio State[edit]

Week 8: Ohio State at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Ohio State 7 0 7 6 20
Michigan 0 7 7 6 20

On November 22, 1941, Michigan finished its season playing to a 20 to 20 tie with Ohio State. Michigan's touchdowns were scored by halfback Tom Kuzma (on a one-yard run), end Harlin Fraumann (on a lateral from George Ceithaml to Kuzma, who then passed to Fraumann), and fullback Bob Westfall (on a five-yard run). Westfall gained 162 rushing yards in his final game for Michigan. The Wolverines out-gained the Buckeyes in rushing, 271 yards to 179 yards. Michigan's Bill Melzow kicked two points after touchdown but, in the fourth quarter, kicked wide on the third attempt that would have given Michigan a victory.[25][26]

Michigan's starting lineup against Minnesota was Fraumann (left end), Al Wistert (left tackle), Robert Kolesar (left guard), Robert Ingalls (center), Merv Pregulman (right guard), Reuben Kelto (right tackle), Philip Sharpe (right end), George Ceithaml (quarterback), Kuzma (left halfback), Paul White (right halfback), and Westfall (fullback).[25]

Scoring summary[edit]

Player Touchdowns Extra points Field goals Points
Tom Kuzma 8 0 0 48
Bob Westfall 7 0 0 42
Bill Melzow 0 12 0 12
Harlin Fraumann 2 0 0 12
David M. Nelson 1 0 0 6
Don Robinson 1 0 0 6
Donald Boor 1 0 0 6
Harold Lockard 1 0 0 6
Joe Rogers 1 0 0 6
Robert Ingalls 0 3 0 3
Totals 22 15 0 147

Post-season[edit]

On December 1, 1941, the Associated Press released the results of its final football ranking poll of the 1941 season. With 945-1/2 points and 84 of 96 first place votes, the national championship was awarded to Minnesota, the only team to defeat Michigan during the 1941 season. Michigan ranked #5 in the final AP Poll with 455 points.[27]

With respect to individual awards, fullback Bob Westfall was the only Wolverine to receive first-team All-America honors. Westfall was a consensus All-American,[28] receiving first-team honors from the All-America Board, Collier's Weekly (selected by Grantland Rice), the International News Service, Liberty magazine, the Newspaper Enterprise Association, Newsweek, the Sporting News, the United Press, the Central Press Association and the Walter Camp Football Foundation. Westfall also received All-Big Ten honors from both the Associated Press and the United Press.[29][30] (In 1987, Westfall was enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame.)

Other Wolverines receiving post-season honors included:

  • Right tackle Al Wistert received second-team All-America honors from the United Press,[31] Central Press,[32] and Life magazine.[33] He was also selected as the fullback on the national champion Minnesota team's "all-opponent" team.[34]
  • Left tackle Reuben Kelto received the team's Most Valuable Player award.[1] After Kelto played 56 of 60 minutes against Illinois in 1941, a writer in the Detroit Free Press wrote: "If ever there was an under-rated football player, it is this 198-pound tackle."[35][36]
  • Center Robert Ingalls was selected by the United Press and the Associated Press as a first-team All-Big Ten player.[29][30] He was also selected as the center on Minnesota's "all-opponent" team.[34]
  • Halfback Tom Kuzma, Michigan's leading scorer, received second-team All-Big Ten honors from the United Press.[30] Kuzma ranked eighth among halfbacks in the United Press' All-America voting, earning "honorable mention" with 144 points.[37] He was also selected as a halfback on Minnesota's "all-opponent" team.[34]
  • Guard Merv Pregulman was selected by the United Press as a second-team All-Big Ten player.[30] Pregulman also received the team's Meyer Morton Award,[1] as the player who showed "the greatest development and most promise as a result of the annual spring practice."[38] He was also selected as a guard on Minnesota's "all-opponent" team.[34]
  • End Joe Rogers was selected by the Associated Press as a second-team All-Big Ten player.[29]

Players[edit]

Varsity letter winners[edit]

Twenty-five players received varsity letters for their participation on the 1941 Michigan team. The letter winners were:[39]

Other players[edit]

Other players included on Michigan's 1941 roster include the following:[39]

  • John G. Allerdice,[46] halfback, Indianapolis, IN
  • Ralph H. Amstutz,[47] guard, Oak Park, IL
  • Harry F. Anderson, guard, Chicago, IL
  • James J. Brown, halfback, St. Ignace, MI
  • Norman D. Call,[48] halfack, Norwalk, OH
  • Harrison H. Caswell,[49] tackle, Ann Arbor, MI
  • Otto E. Chady,[50] end, Highland Park, Mich.
  • Fred Dawley, quarterback, Detroit, MI
  • Theodore E. Denise, tackle, Lansing, MI
  • Walter B. Freihofer,[51] end, Indianapolis, IN
  • John J. Greene, quarterback, Pittsburgh, PA
  • James Grissen, fullback, Holland, MI
  • John F. Harrigan, quarterback, Detroit MI
  • Charles J. Haslam, quarterback, Duluth, MN
  • George H. Hildebrandt, tackle, Hamburg, NY
  • Joseph Joseph, fullback, Highland Park, MI
  • Charles F. Kennedy, halfback, Van Wert, OH
  • William E. Kuyper, tackle, Newtonville, MA
  • William M. MacConnachie, end, Upper Mt. Clair, NJ
  • William J. MacDougall, tackle, Highland Park, MI
  • Robert L. McFaddin, center, Detroit
  • Austin S. Miller, fullback, Mt. Pleasant, MI
  • Robert L. Morrison, halfback, Minocqua, WI
  • Jack Petoskey, end, Dearborn, MI
  • Bill Pritula, center, Detroit
  • Reino J. Romo,[52] halfback, Bessemer, MI
  • Vincent C. Secontine, tackle, Detroit
  • Robert W. Shemky,[53] end, Crystal Falls, MI
  • Ray B. Sowers, halfback, Bay City, MI
  • Robert P. Stenberg, fullback, Chicago
  • Alfred S. Thomas, halfback, Detroit
  • Angelo E. Trogan,[54] guard, Saginaw, MI
  • Clifford C. Wise, halfback, Grand Haven, MI
  • Louis K. Woytek, center

Awards and honors[edit]

Coaching and training staff[edit]

Backfield: Earl Martineau,[3][55] assisted by Hercules Renda[1]
Linemen: Biggie Munn, assisted by Archie Kodros[3]
Freshmen: Wally Weber, assisted by former Michigan fullback Howard "Jeep" Mehaffey[3]
Other assistant coaches: Cliff Keen (head wrestling coach and asst. football coach), Ernest McCoy (head basketball coach and asst. football coach), and Bennie Oosterbaan (head basketball coach and asst. football coach)[1]
  • Manager: William L. Hurley, assisted by Edward K. Aldworth, James D. Kline, Howard F. DeYoung, and Albert L. Gruenewald[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "1941 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved June 23, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c "1940 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved June 23, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Watson Spoelstra (September 9, 1941). "Replacement for Harmon Big Wolverines Problem". The Ludington Daily News. p. 6. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Herbert O. (Fritz) Crisler (September 17, 1941). "Michigan's Outlook for Another Superior Grid Team Is Dim". Ames Daily Tribune. p. 3. 
  5. ^ "Army Hurts Michigan". The Wakefield News. September 12, 1941. p. 6. 
  6. ^ "Westfall Ready for Another Good Season". The Wakefield News. September 19, 1941. p. 4. 
  7. ^ "Crisler Seeks Back to Fill Harmon's Shoes". The Wakefield News. September 19, 1941. p. 4. 
  8. ^ a b Rex Hess (January 9, 1942). "Sports Podge". The Mansfield News Journal. p. 16. 
  9. ^ "Sports Briefs". The Wakefield News. September 19, 1941. p. 4. 
  10. ^ a b Wilfrid Smith (September 28, 1941). "Wolverines Top State, 19-7, By 3d Period Drive: Spartans Score on 74 Yard Run". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  11. ^ "Michigan Rallies for 19-7 Triumph: 67,079 See Fenton's 74-Yard Run in First Two Minutes Put Michigan State Ahead". The New York Time (AP story). September 28, 1941. 
  12. ^ a b Charles Bartlett (October 5, 1941). "Wolverines' First Period Score Beats Iowa, 6-0, in Big 9 Opener". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  13. ^ "Michigan Victor Over Iowa, 6 to 0; Kuzma Plunges to Touchdown in First Period After His 22-Yard Punt Return". The New York Time (AP story). October 5, 1941. 
  14. ^ "Michigan vs. Pittsburgh (PA)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved June 22, 2015. 
  15. ^ a b c "Michigan Routs Pittsburgh, 40-0; Kuzma Sets Pace as Wolverines Crush Panthers in First Game Between Elevens". The New York Times. October 12, 1941. 
  16. ^ a b Irving Vaughan (October 12, 1941). "Michigan Piles Over Pitt for 40-0 Victory". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  17. ^ a b Wilfrid Smith (November 2, 1941). "Michigan Passes Beat Northwestern, 14-7: Kuzma Tosses Twice to Score for Wolverine; Fraumann, Rogers Cross Goal". Chicago Tribune. 
  18. ^ "Michigan Victor on Long Pass, 14-7; Kuzma's 2 Touchdown Tosses, Second Gaining 46 Yards, Defeat Northwestern". The New York Times (AP story). October 19, 1941. 
  19. ^ a b Arch Ward (October 26, 1941). "Minnesota Bears Michigan, 7-0: Gophers Score Touchdown in Second Period; 85,753 See Losers' Line Outplayed". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  20. ^ Allison Danzig (October 26, 1941). "85,753 See Gophers; Bruce Smith Hurt After Punting 78 Yards and Hurling Pass for 43". The New York Times. 
  21. ^ a b Edward Burns (November 2, 1941). "Westafall and Kuzma Score for Michigan in Battle of Fumbles". Chicago Tribune. 
  22. ^ "Michigan Downs Illinois, 20 to 0; 30,000 See Westfall Pace the Wolverines to Smashing Conference Victory". The New York Times. November 2, 1941. 
  23. ^ a b Herbert Vedder (November 16, 1941). "Michigan Is Victor, 28-0, at Columbia". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  24. ^ Allison Danzig (November 16, 1941). "Lions Outclassed: Westfall Scores Thrice and Kuzma Once in Parade of Power". The New York Times. 
  25. ^ a b Wilfrid Smith (November 23, 1941). "Michigan Ties Ohio: 85,757 Watch 20-20 Battle at Ann Arbor". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  26. ^ "Ohio State Ties Michigan, 20-All; Rivals Share Second Place in Western Conference -- Game Thrills 85,753 Fans". The New York Times. November 23, 1941. 
  27. ^ "Gophers Retain Top Grid Ranking". The Maryville Daily Forum (AP story). December 2, 1941. p. 6. 
  28. ^ "2014 NCAA Football Records: Consensus All-America Selections" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2014. p. 6. Retrieved August 16, 2014. 
  29. ^ a b c d "Four Minnesotans On Big Ten Team". The Independent, St. Petersburg, Fla. (AP story). November 27, 1941. p. 16. 
  30. ^ a b c d e "Eleven Best in Big Ten Circles on Honor Rolls". Freeport Journal-Standard (Freeport, Illinois). November 21, 1941. p. 13. 
  31. ^ "United Press All-Stars". Los Angeles Times. December 4, 1941. 
  32. ^ Walter L. Johns, Central Press Sports Editor (December 7, 1941). "Midwest, South Top Captains' All-Americas". Reading Eagle. 
  33. ^ "Al DeMao, Rokisky on All-America Teams". The Pittsburgh Press. 1941-11-29. 
  34. ^ a b c d "Gophers Put Kuzma, Westafall on Foe Team". The Bismarck Tribune. November 27, 1941. p. 6. 
  35. ^ "Praise Kelto for His Play: Writer Selects Him as One of Michigan's Unsung Heroes". The Ironwood Daily Globe. November 5, 1941. 
  36. ^ "Kelto May Be All-American: Bessemer Lad Is Main Cog Of Michigan's Line Play To Date". Ironwood Daily Globe. October 11, 1941. p. 8. 
  37. ^ "All Star Team Selected by Sports Writers". The Evening Standard, Uniontown, PA. December 3, 1941. p. 11. 
  38. ^ "The Meyer Morton Award". University of Michigan. Retrieved November 6, 2011. 
  39. ^ a b "1941 Michigan Football Roster". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved June 24, 2015. 
  40. ^ Donald Boor, born July 16, 1920, died June 1985, SSN issued Michigan, last address Northville, Michigan
  41. ^ Robert L. Flora, born in Muskegon, Michigan, November 23, 1915. Served in WWII from 1942 to 1945. He coached football at Washington State and the University of Iowa and was assistant athletic director at Iowa under Forrest Evashevski. He later served as an assistant coach at Michigan State under Biggy Munn. He last worked as athletic facilities director at the University of Michigan. He died in an automobile accident on December 4, 2007, near St. Ignace, Michigan.
  42. ^ Harlin E. Fraumann, born March 3, 1919, died December 2, 2006, last residence Clinton, Michigan
  43. ^ Harold Lockard, February 7, 1920, died February 1971, SSN issued Ohio
  44. ^ William Melzow, born December 6, 1919, died September 30, 2001, last address, Holt, Michigan
  45. ^ Philip E. Sharpe, born July 17, 1921, died September 1, 2005, SSN issued Ohio, last address Seattle, Washington
  46. ^ John G. Allerdice was the son of Yost-era star Dave Allerdice. He transferred to Princeton in the fall of 1941.
  47. ^ Ralph Howard Amstutz, born in Chicago and graduated from Oak Park/River Forest High School. He lived in Naples, Floria, and had previously lived at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He was the vice president of engineering for Schick Electric in Lancaster. He was also a real estate developer in Lancaster. He died November 5, 2007, at age 85.
  48. ^ Norman D. Call. Graduated from Norwalk High School in 1938. Served as an ensign in the Coast Guard after attending Michigan. He died in 1944 while helping rescue a navy destroyer that had been torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of North Carolina. He was inducted into the Norwalk Hall of Fame in 2003.
  49. ^ Harrison H. Caswell, Jr., born May 2, 1921, died December 7, 1996. Buried at Bethlehem Cemetery in Ann Arbor.
  50. ^ Otto E. Chady, born January 2, 1921, died June 17, 2009. He was a resident of Glenmoore, Pennsylvania.
  51. ^ Walter B. Freihofer, born May 26, 2012 at Albany, New York. He grew up in Indianapolis and attended Shortridge High School. He served in the U.S. Army in Europe during WWII. He practiced law in Grand Rapids for over 50 years. He was also Kentwood City Attorney for over 20 years. He died May 26, 2012.
  52. ^ Reino J Romo, born on July 25, 1921, died on February 13, 1994.
  53. ^ Robert Shemky was from Crystal Falls, Michigan. He coached St. Joseph's (Ind.) College to an NAIA national football championship in the 1950s. He was inducted into the Upper Peninsula Sports Hall of Fame in 1990.
  54. ^ Angelo E. Trogan, born August 22, 1920, died July 30, 1973. Buried Mount Olivet Cemetery, Saginaw, Michigan.
  55. ^ "Top Role in Defense Is Seen for Athletes". Arizona Independent Republic. April 23, 1941. p. 11. (identifying Martineau as Michigan's backfield coach)

External links[edit]