1968 Michigan Wolverines football team

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1968 Michigan Wolverines football
Conference Big Ten Conference
Ranking
Coaches No. 15
AP No. 12
1968 record 8–2 (6–1 Big Ten)
Head coach Bump Elliott (10th year)
MVP Ron Johnson
Captain Ron Johnson
Home stadium Michigan Stadium
Seasons
« 1967 1969 »
1968 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#1 Ohio State $ 7 0 0     10 0 0
#12 Michigan 6 1 0     8 2 0
#10 Purdue 5 2 0     8 2 0
Minnesota 5 2 0     6 4 0
Indiana 4 3 0     6 4 0
Iowa 4 3 0     5 5 0
Michigan State 2 5 0     5 5 0
Illinois 1 6 0     1 9 0
Northwestern 1 6 0     1 9 0
Wisconsin 0 7 0     0 10 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1968 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1968 college football season. In their tenth and final season under head coach Bump Elliott, the Wolverines compiled an 8-2 record, outscored opponents 277 to 155, and finished the season in second place in the Big Ten Conference and ranked #12 in the final AP Poll. After losing the season opener to California, the Wolverines won their next eight games by a combined score of 256 to 84. The team rose to #4 in the AP poll before losing to Ohio State by a 50-14 score in the final game of the season.[1]

On November 16, 1968, Michigan running back Ron Johnson set an NCAA record with 347 rushing yards against Wisconsin.[2][3] He also finished his career with a school record 2,524 rushing yards. At the end of the year, Johnson was selected as Michigan's most valuable player and a first-team All-American. He also won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the most valuable player in the Big Ten.

Defensive back Tom Curtis set a new Big Ten record with 10 interceptions in 1968 and was selected as a first-team All-Big Ten player. Michigan's other first-team All-Big Ten players included Johnson, quarterback Dennis Brown, and ends Jim Mandich and Phil Seymour.

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 21 California* Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI L 7–21   71,386
September 28 at Duke* Wallace Wade StadiumDurham, NC W 31–10   25,000
October 5 Navy* Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 32–9   56,501
October 12 No. 12/NA Michigan State Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (Paul Bunyan Trophy) W 28–14   102,785
October 19 at No. 19/NR Indiana No. 18/18 Memorial StadiumBloomington, IN W 27–22   51,951
October 26 Minnesotadagger No. 12/14 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (Little Brown Jug) W 33–20   69,384
November 2 at Northwestern No. 9/10 Dyche StadiumEvanston, IL W 35–0   40,101
November 9 Illinois No. 7/7 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (Series) W 36–0   56,775
November 16 Wisconsin No. 4/4 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI W 34–9   51,117
November 23 at No. 2/2 Ohio State No. 4/4 Ohio StadiumColumbus, OH (Rivalry) L 14–50   85,371
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll / Coaches' Poll released prior to game. All times are in Eastern Time.

Season summary[edit]

Pre-season[edit]

The 1967 Michigan team compiled a 4–6 (3–4 Big Ten) record.[4] After compiling a 14–16 record since 1964, Elliott became the subject of a "Dump Bump" campaign among Michigan alumni.[5]

Two key players returned to the 1968 team as senior leaders on offense. Halfback Ron Johnson rushed for over 1,000 yards in 1967 and was selected as a second-team All-American, and quarterback Dennis Brown in 1967 broke the Big Ten Conference record for total offense.[5][6]

In late 1967, Fritz Crisler, who had been Michigan's athletic director since 1941, announced that he would retire effective June 30, 1968. On March 15, 1968, Don Canham, who had been Michigan's track coach since 1948, was selected to replace Crisler as Michigan's athletic director.[7]

In early April 1968, Ron Johnson was selected as the captain of the 1968 team. He was the first African-American to receive the honor.[8]

Recruiting[edit]

In his final year as Michigan's head coach, Bump Elliott secured one of the strongest recruiting classes in Michigan football history. Michigan's 1968 recruits included:[9][10]

  • Guard Reggie McKenzie, who starred on Bo Schembechler's early Michigan teams and was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame;
  • Tight end Paul Seymour, who became a consensus All-American under Schembechler in 1972;
  • Linebacker Mike Taylor, who became a consensus All-American in 1971;
  • Defensive back Thom Darden, who became a first-team All-American in 1971 and later played 10 year in the NFL;
  • Wide receiver Glenn Doughty, who went on to play for the Baltimore Colts from 1972 to 1979;
  • Defensive end Tom Beckman, who played three years in the NFL;
  • Running back Billy Taylor, who broke Michigan's career rushing record;
  • Linebacker Mike Keller, who became a first-team All-Big Ten player in 1971 and played in the NFL for two years;
  • Offensive lineman Guy Murdock, who was an All-Big Ten player in 1970 and 1971 and played three seasons of professional football;
  • Fullback Fritz Seyferth, who later played in the Canadian Football League;
  • Tight end Tom Huiskens, who was Male High School Athlete of the Year for the State of Michigan for the 1967-68 academic year;[11] and
  • Offensive tackle Jim Brandstatter, who later gained fame as a sports broadcaster.

Week 1: California[edit]

Week 1: California at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
California 14 0 0 7 21
Michigan 0 7 0 0 7

On September 21, 1968, Michigan opened its season at Michigan Stadium with a loss to California by a 21 to 7 score.[12] The game was the sixth meeting between the two programs, including a four-game series from 1965 to 1968. Michigan had won the first four games, but had lost the 1967 game by a 10 to 9 score.[13]

California halfback Gary Fowler scored twice in the opening quarter on runs of 12 and 6 yards to give California a 14 to 0 lead. Michigan scored in the second quarter on an eight-yard pass from Dennis Brown to Jim Mandich. Tim Killian kicked the point after touchdown. Fowler scored again on a 12-yard run in the fourth quarter to extend California's lead. Michigan was held to 99 rushing yards and 135 passing yards in the game. California gained 240 rushing yards and 40 passing yards.[12][14]

Michigan's starting lineup against California was Mandich (left end), Bob Penska (left tackle), Bob Baumgartner (left guard), Dave Denzin (center), Stan Broadnax (right guard), Dan Dierdorf (right tackle), Jerry Imsland (right end), Brown (quarterback), John Gabler (left halfback), Ron Johnson (right halfback), and Garvie Craw (fullback).[12]

Week 2: at Duke[edit]

Week 5: Michigan at Duke
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 7 7 3 14 31
Duke 0 7 3 0 10

On September 28, 1968, Michigan defeated Duke by a 31 to 10 score in front of a crowd of 25,000 spectators at Wallace Wade Stadium in Durham, North Carolina.[15] The game was the fourth meeting between the two programs. Michigan had won the prior three games, including the 1968 game by a 10 to 7 score.[16]

Michigan halfback Ron Johnson gained 205 rushing yards (189 yards in the first half alone) and scored two touchdowns on runs of 53 yards in the second quarter and one yard in the fourth quarter. Michigan's other two touchdowns were scored by Jerry Imsland (23-yard pass from Dennis Brown in the first quarter) and Marty Huff (44-yard interception return in the fourth quarter). Tim Killian kicked a 25-yard field goal in the third quarter and converted four points after touchdown.[15][17]

Michigan's starting lineup against Duke was Jim Mandich (left end), Bob Penska (left tackle), Bob Baumgartner (left guard), Dave Denzin (center), Stan Broadnax (right guard), Dan Dierdorf (right tackle), Bill Harris (right end), Brown (quarterback), John Gabler (left halfback), Johnson (right halfback), and Garvie Craw (fullback).[15]

Week 3: Navy[edit]

Week 3: Navy at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Navy 3 0 0 6 9
Michigan 0 19 6 7 32

On October 5, 1968, Michigan defeated Navy by a 32 to 9 score in front of a crowd of 56,501 spectators at Michigan Stadium.[18] The game was the 11th meeting between the Michigan and Navy programs. Michigan had a record of 4-5-1 in the prior meetings and had lost the 1967 game by a 26 to 21 score.[19] Michigan's dominating performance against Navy led David Condon to write in the Chicago Tribune: "Today the Wolverines were like the old champions of the west. Today they were the glorious Wolverines of days gone by. This was Michigan."[18]

Ron Johnson gained 121 yards on 22 carries. Michigan's five touchdowns were scored as follows: two-yard run by Johnson in the second quarter; three-yard run by Dennis Brown in the second quarter; 19-yard pass from Brown to Jim Mandich in the second quarter; 39-yard run by Johnson in the third quarter; and one-yard run by Greg Harrison in the fourth quarter. George Hoey returned a punt 63 yards to set up Johnson's first touchdown and returned another punt 36 yards to set up Brown's touchdown pass to Mandich. Hoey also intercepted two Navy passes, returning one of them 48 yards. Tim Killian kicked two out of five extra point attempts and missed a field goal attempt. Navy did not score its lone touchdown until 30 seconds remained in the game, while Michigan's reserves were on the field. Michigan gained 185 rushing yard and 175 passing yards in the game. Navy gained 92 rushing yards and 247 passing yards[18][20]

Michigan's starting lineup against Navy was Mandich (left end), Bob Penska (left tackle), Dick Caldarazzo (left guard), Dave Denzin (center), Stan Broadnax (right guard), Dan Dierdorf (right tackle), Jerry Imsland (right end), Brown (quarterback), Paul Staroba (left halfback), Johnson (right halfback), and Garvie Craw (fullback).[18]

Week 4: Michigan State[edit]

Week 4: Michigan State at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan State 6 0 0 8 14
Michigan 13 0 0 15 28

On October 12, 1968, Michigan defeated Duffy Daugherty's Michigan State Spartans by a 28 to 14 score. The game was the 61st meeting in the Michigan–Michigan State football rivalry.[21] The Spartans had won three consecutive games from 1965 to 1967,[21] and the Wolverines came into the 1968 game as an unranked underdog facing an undefeated Spartans team that had routed Wisconsin 39-0 the prior week and was ranked #12 in the AP Poll.[22]

Michigan quarterback Dennis Brown completed 9 of 15 passes for 177 yards and two touchdowns. Jim Mandich caught four passes for 125 yards, including a 53-yard touchdown reception, and John Gabler also caught a touchdown pass. Ron Johnson carried the ball 19 times for 152 yards and a touchdown. Fullback Garvie Craw also ran 25 yards for a touchdown and caught a pass from Brown for a two-point conversion. Tim Killian also kicked two extra points for Michigan. Michigan gained 420 yards in the game, 243 rushing and 177 passing. Michigan State gained 356 yards, 295 rushing and 61 passing.[23][24]

After defeating Michigan State, the Wolverines were ranked #17 in the weekly AP poll.[25] It was the first time since early in the 1966 season that Michigan had been ranked.

Michigan's starting lineup against Michigan State was Jerry Imsland (left end), Bob Penska (left tackle), Dick Caldarazzo (left guard), Dave Denzin (center), Stan Broadnax (right guard), Dan Dierdorf (right tackle), Mandich (right end), Brown (quarterback), Johnson (left halfback), Gabler (right halfback), and Craw (fullback).[23]

Week 5: at Indiana[edit]

Week 5: Michigan at Indiana
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 7 0 13 7 27
Indiana 0 7 9 6 22

On October 19, 1968, Michigan defeated Indiana by a 27 to 22 score. The game was the 29th meeting between the two programs. Michigan lost the 1967 game by a 27 to 20 score.[26]

Michigan quarterback Dennis Brown completed 14 of 30 passes for 162 yards and two touchdowns. John Gabler and Bill Harris were on the receiving end of Brown's touchdown throws in the third and fourth quarters, respectively. Ron Johnson gained 163 rushing yards and scored one touchdown on 34 carries. Indiana mistakes on consecutive plays led to two Michigan touchdowns in the third quarter: Jerry Hartman returned an interception 62 yards for a touchdown; Indiana fumbled the kickoff following Hartman's touchdown, and Ed Moore recovered for Michigan at the Indiana 19-yard line. Gabler scored four plays later on a pass from Brown. Tim Killian kicked three points after touchdown from Michigan.[27][28]

Michigan's starting lineup against Indiana was Jim Mandich (left end), Bob Penska (left tackle), Dick Coldarazzo (left guard), Dave Denzin (center), Stan Broadnax (right guard), Dan Dierdorf (right tackle), Jerry Imsland (right end), Brown (quarterback), Jim Betts (left halfback), Johnson (right halfback), and Garvie Craw (fullback).[27]

Week 6: Minnesota[edit]

Week 6: Minnesota at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Minnesota 0 0 0 20 20
Michigan 12 18 3 0 33

On October 26, 1968, Michigan defeated Minnesota by a 33 to 20 score before a homecoming crowd of 69,384.[29] The game was the 59th meeting in the Little Brown Jug rivalry. Michigan lost the 1967 game by a 20-15 score.[30]

Dennis Brown completed 11 of 20 passes for 152 yards and two touchdowns. Bill Harris caught three passes for 85 yards and a touchdown, and Paul Staroba also caught a touchdown pass. Ron Johnson carried the ball 33 times for 84 yards and two touchdowns. Tim Killian also kicked three field goals (24, 32, and 31 yards) for Michigan. Michigan led 30-0 at halftime and 33-0 at the start of the fourth quarter, but Minnesota mounted a comeback with 20 points in the fourth quarter with Michigan's reserves in the game. Michigan gained 252 rushing yards and 201 passing yards in the game. Minnesota gained 149 rushing yards and 200 passing yards.[29][31]

Michigan's starting lineup against Illinois was Jim Mandich (left end), Bob Penska (left tackle), Dick Caldarazzo (left guard), Dave Denzin (center), Stan Broadnax (right guard), Dan Dierdorf (right tackle), Jerry Imsland (right end), Dennis Brown (quarterback), Johnson (left halfback), John Gabler (right halfback), and Garvie Craw (fullback).[29]

Week 7: at Northwestern[edit]

Week 7: Michigan at Northwestern
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 0 28 0 7 35
Northwestern 0 0 0 0 0

On November 2, 1968, Michigan defeated Northwestern by a 35 to 0 score at Dyche Stadium in Evanston, Illinois. The game was the 41st meeting between the programs. Michigan had won five of the prior six meetings, including the 1967 game.[32]

Michigan scored 28 points in the second quarter (21 of them within 73 second), including two touchdowns on short runs by Ron Johnson, another on a 50-yard interception return by Dan Parks, and another on a four-yard pass from Dennis Brown to Bill Harris. The Wolverines scored again in the fourth quarter on a short run by Lance Scheffler. Tim Killian kicked three points after touchdown, and Brown passed to Johnson for a two-point conversion in the second quarter. Ron Johnson rushed for 129 yards and two touchdowns on 24 carries. Tom Curtis intercepted two passes in the game.[33][34]

Michigan's starting lineup against Northwestern was Bill Harris (left end), Bob Penska (left tackle), Dick Coldarazzo (left guard), Dave Denzin (center), Stan Broadnax (right guard), Dan Dierdorf (right tackle), Jim Mandich (right end), Brown (quarterback), Johnson (left halfback), John Gabler (right halfback), and Garvie Craw (fullback).[33]

Week 8: Illinois[edit]

Week 8: Illinois at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Illinois 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 6 14 9 7 36

On November 9, 1968, Michigan defeated Illinois by a 36 to 0 score at Michigan Stadium. The game was the 54th meeting between the programs and matched head coach Bump Elliott against his brother Pete Elliott, the Illinois coach. Michigan had won eight of the prior nine meetings, including the 1967 game.[35]

Dennis Brown completed 13 of 27 passes for 226 yards and two touchdowns, ran for a two-point conversion, and also rushed for 45 yards. Jim Mandich led the receivers with seven catches for 84 yards, while touchdown catches were made by Billy Harris (69-yard pass from Brown), Paul Staroba (14-yard pass from Brown), and Mike Hankwitz (six-yard pass from Don Moorhead). Ron Johnson rushed for 51 yards and two touchdowns on 19 carries. Tim Killian kicked a 26-yard field goal and a point after touchdown[36][37]

Michigan's starting lineup against Illinois was Jim Mandich (left end), Bob Penska (left tackle), Dick Caldarazzo (left guard), Dave Denzin (center), Stan Broadnax (right guard), Dan Dierdorf (right tackle), Jerry Imsland (right end), Dennis Brown (quarterback), John Gabler (left halfback), Johnson (right halfback), and Garvie Craw (fullback).[36]

Week 9: Wisconsin[edit]

Week 9: Wisconsin at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Wisconsin 6 3 0 0 9
Michigan 7 0 20 7 34

On November 16, 1968, Michigan defeated Wisconsin by a 34 to 9 score before a crowd of 51,117 at Michigan Stadium. The game was the 30th meeting between the programs. Michigan had won the prior three games from 1965 to 1967.[38]

Ron Johnson set a modern Big Ten Conference record with 347 rushing yards on 31 carries. Johnson also scored all five touchdowns for Michigan on runs of 35, 67, 1, 60, and 49 yards. Tim Killian kicked four points after touchdown. Tom Curtis also set a Big Ten record with his tenth interception of the game. Michigan gained 364 rushing yards and 117 passing yards. Wisconsin gained 136 rushing yards and 53 passing yards.[39][40]

Michigan's starting lineup against Wisconsin was Jim Mandich (left end), Bob Penska (left tackle), Dick Caldarazzo (left guard), Dave Denzin (center), Stan Broadnax (right guard), Dan Dierdorf (right tackle), Bill Harris (right end), Dennis Brown (quarterback), John Gabler (left halfback), Johnson (right halfback), and Garvie Craw (fullback).[39]

Week 10: at Ohio State[edit]

Week 10: Michigan at Ohio State
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 7 7 0 0 14
Ohio State 7 14 6 23 50
  • Date: November 23, 1968
  • Location: Ohio Stadium
    Columbus, OH
  • Game attendance: 85,371 [new stadium record]
  • Referee: Jerry Markbreit

On November 23, 1968, Michigan suffered its second loss of the season, falling to an undefeated Ohio State team. The Buckeyes won a 50 to 14 score at Ohio Stadium.[1] The game was the 65th meeting in the Michigan–Ohio State football rivalry. Michigan lost the 1967 game by a 20-14 score.[41] The Wolverines came into the 1968 game ranked #4 in the AP poll, and the Buckeyes ranked #2.[1]

Ron Johnson gained 91 rushing yards and scored both touchdowns for Michigan, and Tim Killian kicked both points after touchdown. Jim Mandich also caught seven passes for 78 yards for Michigan. Led by Jim Otis, Ohio State gained 421 rushing yards in the game. Otis accounted for 143 yards and scored four touchdowns, while Rex Kern tallied 96 rushing yards and 41 passing yards.[42][43]

Michigan's starting lineup against Ohio State was Jim Mandich (left end), Bob Penska (left tackle), Dick Coldarazzo (left guard), Dave Denzin (center), Stan Broadnax (right guard), Dan Dierdorf (right tackle), Jerry Imsland (right end), Dennis Brown (quarterback), John Gabler (left halfback), Johnson (right halfback), and Garvie Craw (fullback).[42]

Post-season[edit]

In early January 1969, the Associated Press released its final post-season college football poll for the 1968 season. The 1968 Ohio State Buckeyes football team was ranked #1 in the poll. Michigan was ranked #12.[44]

After setting Michigan's career, season and single-game rushing records, Ron Johnson received numerous honors at the end of the 1968 season, including the following:

While Johnson was the only Michigan player to receive first-team All-American honors, ten Michigan players received All-Big Ten Conference honors from either the Associated Press (AP) or United Press International (UPI). The Michigan honorees were: quarterback Dennis Brown (AP-1, UPI-1); running back Ron Johnson (AP-1, UPI-1); end Jim Mandich (AP-1, UPI-1); end Phil Seymour (AP-1, UPI-1); defensive back Tom Curtis (AP-1, UPI-1); defensive tackle Tom Goss (AP-1); linebacker Tom Stincic (UPI-1); defensive tackle Henry Hill (AP-2); offensive tackle Dan Dierdorf (AP-2); and offensive guard Stan Broadnax (AP-2).[51][52]

On December 24, 1968, the University of Michigan announced that head coach Bump Elliott head been offered a newly created position as associate athletic director. The Detroit News reported that Elliott had resigned as head football coach.[53] Two days later, on December 26, 1968, Bo Schembechler was hired to replace Elliott as Michigan's head coach.[54]

Players[edit]

Offensive letter winners[edit]

The following players won varsity letters for their participation on the 1968 Michigan football team.[1] Players who started at least half of Michigan's games are shown in bold.[10]

Defensive letter winners[edit]

The following players won varsity letters for their participation on the 1968 Michigan football team.[1] Players who started at least half of Michigan's games are shown in bold.[10]

  • James Banar, defensive tackle, junior, Detroit, Michigan
  • Tom Curtis, defensive halfback, junior, Aurora, Ohio - started all 10 games at left safety (also started 1 game at left halfback on offense)
  • Thomas Doane, linebacker, junior, Wauseon, Ohio
  • Alan Francis, defensive guard, junior, Euclid, Ohio
  • Terry Frysinger, defensive tackle, senior, Ecorse, Michigan
  • Tom Goss, defensive tackle, senior, Knoxville, Tennessee - started all 10 games at left defensive tackle (also started 1 game at left tackle on offense)
  • Gerald "Jerry" Hartman, defensive halfback, senior, Ann Arbor, Michigan - started 4 games at left defensive halfback and 2 games at right safety
  • Brian Healy, defensive halfback, junior, Sandusky, Ohio - started 6 games at left defensive halfback (also started 1 game at quarterback on offense)
  • Henry Hill, defensive guard, sophomore, Detroit, Michigan - started 7 games at middle guard
  • George Hoey, defensive halfback, senior, Flint, Michigan - started all 10 games at right defensive halfback (also started 1 game at fullback and 1 game at left halfback on offense)
  • Marty Huff, linebacker, sophomore, Toledo, Ohio
  • Timothy Killian, linebacker, sophomore, Lincoln Park, Michigan
  • Jon E. Kramer, defensive end, senior, Toledo, Ohio - started 1 game at right defensive end
  • John Lynch, defensive back, freshman, Chicago, Illinois
  • Richard McCoy, Jr., defensive tackle, sophomore, Alliance, Ohio
  • Gerald Miklos, defensive guard, senior, Chicago, Illinois - started 3 games at middle guard (also started 1 game at center on offense)
  • Edward M. "Ed" Moore, linebacker, sophomore, Youngstown, Ohio - started all 10 games at linebacker (also started 1 game at right guard on offense)
  • Pete Newell, defensive end, sophomore, Park Ridge, Illinois
  • Daniel Parks, defensive tackle, sophomore, Birmingham, Michigan - started all 10 games at right defensive tackle (also started 1 game at right tackle on offense)
  • Barry Pierson, defensive halfback, junior, St. Ignace, Michigan
  • Cecil Pryor, linebacker, junior, Corpus Christi, Texas - started 8 games at right defensive end (also started 1 game at right end on offense)
  • Elijah Sansom, defensive halfback, senior, Detroit, Michigan
  • Phil Seymour, defensive end, junior, Berkley, Michigan - started all 10 games at left defensive end (also started 1 game at left end on offense)
  • Dennis Sirosky, linebacker, senior, Ecorse, Michigan
  • Tom Stincic, defensive end, senior, Cleveland, Ohio - started all 10 games at linebacker (also started 1 game at left guard on offense)
  • Robert Wedge, defensive halfback, senior, Port Huron, Michigan - started 8 games at right safety (also started 1 game at right halfback on offense)
  • Mark Werner, defensive halfback, junior, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • James Wilhite, defensive guard, junior, Bay City, Michigan - started 1 game at right defensive end
  • Edwin Woolley, defensive end, junior, Pitman, New Jersey

Awards and honors[edit]

Statistical leaders[edit]

Scoring[edit]

Player Touchdowns Extra points Field goals 2-pt. conv. Points
Ron Johnson 19 0 0 1 116
Tim Killian 0 21 5 0 36

Rushing[edit]

Michigan's rushing leaders in 1968, as reflected in the University of Michigan Statistics Archive, are as follows.[55]

Player Attempts Net yards Yards per attempt Touchdowns Long
Ron Johnson 255 1391 5.5 19 53
Garvie Craw 81 307 3.8 1 14

Passing[edit]

Michigan's passing leaders in 1968, as reflected in the University of Michigan Statistics Archive, are as follows.[55]

Player Attempts Completions Interceptions Comp % Yards Yds/Comp TD Long
Dennis Brown 229 109 10 47.6 1562 14.3 12 33
Don Moorhead 25 10 2 40.0 122 12.2 1 10

Receiving[edit]

Michigan's receiving leaders in 1968, as reflected in the University of Michigan Statistics Archive, are as follows.[55]

Player Receptions Yards Yds/Recp TD Long
Jim Mandich 42 565 13.4 3 12
Bill Harris 16 369 23.1 4 69

Coaching staff[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "1968 Football Team". Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan. 
  2. ^ George Langford (November 17, 1968). "Ohio, Michigan Win; Meet on Saturday; Johnson Gets 347 Yards, Scores Five Times To Help Michigan Beat Wisconsin 34 to 9". Chicago Tribune. 
  3. ^ Oliver E. Kuechle (November 18, 1968). "Wisconsin Defeat Summed Up in but 2 Words -- Ron Johnson". The Milwaukee Journal. pp. 2–12. 
  4. ^ "1967 Football Team". Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan. 
  5. ^ a b James DeLand (August 23, 1968). "Football Drills Start Today: 'M' Aiming Two Big Guns". The News-Palladium. p. 15. 
  6. ^ Jim DeLand (May 3, 1968). "'Disappointing' Season Had Bright Spots For Elliott". The News-Palladium. p. 15. 
  7. ^ "Track Coach Canham Will Replace Michigan's Crisler". Des Moines Register. March 16, 1968. p. 3-S. 
  8. ^ "Johnson Named Michigan Captain". The Holland, Michigan, Evening Sentinel. April 3, 1968. p. 4. 
  9. ^ "U-M Emphasis Placed on Linemen". Record-Eagle, Traverse City, Michigan. June 6, 1968. pp. 2–3. 
  10. ^ a b c "1968 Football Roster". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. (freshman players designated "af")
  11. ^ Cory Butzin (August 1, 2010). "Bay County Sports Hall of Fame: Tom Huiskens brought passion to football field at Bay City Central, University of Michigan". Mlive.com. 
  12. ^ a b c John Husar (September 22, 1968). "Wolverines Defeated By California". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  13. ^ "Michigan vs. California". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  14. ^ "California Tops Michigan by 21-7; Fowler Goes Over 3 Times as Bears Gain Upset With Strong Running Attack". The New York Times (AP story). September 22, 1968. p. S1. 
  15. ^ a b c "Michigan, Johnson Beat Duke". Chicago Tribune. September 29, 1968. p. 2-2. 
  16. ^ "Michigan vs. Duke (NC)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  17. ^ "Michigan Scores Over Duke, 31-10; Johnson Gains 205 Yards, Tallies Two Touchdowns". The New York Times (AP story). September 29, 1968. 
  18. ^ a b c d David Condon (October 6, 1968). "Big Michigan Salvos Sink Navy, 32 to 9". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  19. ^ "Michigan vs. Navy (MD)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  20. ^ "Michigan Vanquishes Navy Team, 32-9; Hoey Runs Wild on Punt Returns; His Interceptions Also Help Sink Middies -- Johnson Slams Across Twice". The New York Times (AP story). October 6, 1968. 
  21. ^ a b "Michigan vs. Michigan State". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  22. ^ "Michigan State Yearly Results". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  23. ^ a b Robert Markus (October 13, 1968). "Wolverines Win; Upset M.S.U. on Drives in 4th Quarter; Dennis Brown Paces Victory". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  24. ^ "Michigan Defeats Mich. State, 28-14; Hands Spartans First Loss Before Crowd of 103,785". The New York Times. October 13, 1968. 
  25. ^ "Southern Cal Rises to Top in Grid Poll". Ironwood Daily Globe. October 15, 1968. p. 5. 
  26. ^ "Michigan vs. Indiana". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  27. ^ a b David Condon (October 20, 1968). "Hoosiers Bow to Wolverines; Errors, Errors, Errors Make It 27 to 22". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  28. ^ "Michigan Capitalizes on Indiana Errors to Register 27-22 Big Ten Victory; Hoosier Mistakes Lead to 2 Scores". The New York Times. October 20, 1968. 
  29. ^ a b c Robert Markus (October 27, 1968). "Michigan Romps: Wolverines Keep Big 10 Slate Clean; Destroy Gophers Defense, 33-20". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  30. ^ "Michigan vs. Minnesota". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  31. ^ "untitled". The New York Times. October 27, 1968. p. S7. 
  32. ^ "Michigan vs. Northwestern (IL)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  33. ^ a b Robert Markus (November 3, 1968). "Michigan Routs N.U.: Wolverines Romp, 35 to 0, on Second Quarter Blitz". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  34. ^ "Michigan Triumphs, 35-0". The New York Times. November 3, 1968. 
  35. ^ "Michigan vs. Northwestern (IL)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  36. ^ a b Edward Prell (November 10, 1968). "Michigan Rolls, 36". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  37. ^ "Michigan Victor Over Illini, 36-0; Wins 5th in Row in Big Ten as Johnson Tallies Twice". The New York Times. November 10, 1968. 
  38. ^ "Michigan vs. Wisconsin". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  39. ^ a b George Langford (November 17, 1968). "Johnson Get 347 Yards, Scores Five Times to Help Beat Wisconsin, 34 to 9". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  40. ^ "5 Johnson Scores Win for Michigan; Michigan Downs Wisconsin, 34 to 9". The New York Times. November 17, 1968. p. S1. 
  41. ^ "Michigan vs. Ohio State". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved July 7, 2015. 
  42. ^ a b George Strickler (November 24, 1968). "Ohio Routs Michigan, 50-14, for Title". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  43. ^ George Vecsey (November 24, 1968). "Ohio State and U. S. C. Triumph; Michigan Routed; Buckeyes Win, 50-14, as Otis Stars -- Take Big Ten Title Ohio State Wins Big Ten Title By Trouncing Michigan, 50-14". The New York Times. 
  44. ^ "Buckeyes Rated No. 1, Penn State 2nd in AP". The Lincoln Star. January 4, 1969. p. 11. 
  45. ^ a b Ted Gangi (ed.). "FWAA All-America Since 1944: The All-Time Team" (PDF). Retrieved February 8, 2015. 
  46. ^ "Johnson Wins Player Award: Michigan Names Him Most Valuable". Chicago Tribune. November 29, 1968. 
  47. ^ "Former Wolverine Johnson inducted into collegiate Hall". The Michigan Daily. January 17, 1992. p. 12. 
  48. ^ "Past Silver Football winners". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved March 9, 2015. 
  49. ^ "Ron Johnson Member Biography". National Football Foundation. Retrieved March 7, 2015. 
  50. ^ "Simpson Wins Heisman Race; Keyes Is Second". Chicago Tribune. November 27, 1968. 
  51. ^ a b "Criter All-Big Ten Again". Janesville Daily Gazette (AP story). 1968-11-26. 
  52. ^ a b "Big Ten All-Conference Team". Record-Eagle, Traverse City, Michigan. November 30, 1968. p. 13. 
  53. ^ "Michigan Offers Elliott New Post". Progress Bulletin, Pomona, California. December 25, 1968. p. 5-1. 
  54. ^ "Michigan Replaces Elliott". Janesville Daily Gazette (AP story). December 27, 1968. p. 12. 
  55. ^ a b c "Michigan Football Statistic Archive Query Page". MGoBlue.com. University of Michigan. Retrieved July 11, 2015. (to retrieve 1968 season leaders, go to "Games & Totals by Season" and enter "1968")
  56. ^ "U-M On Road Against Duke". Record-Eagle, Traverse City Mich. September 27, 1968. p. 15. 
  57. ^ William Dodd, born c. 1942, played fullback for Michigan in 1962 and 1963. He listed his hometown as Virden, Illinois. He coached high school football in Northlake, Illinois for two years and then became the freshman coach at Michigan in 1967 and 1968. In 1969, he became a backfield assistant at the University of Idaho, joining the staff of Y C McNease. See Spokane Daily Chronicle.

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