2001 Michigan Wolverines football team

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2001 Michigan Wolverines football
Michigan Wolverines Logo.svg
ConferenceBig Ten Conference
Ranking
CoachesNo. 20
APNo. 20
2001 record8–4 (6–2 Big Ten)
Head coachLloyd Carr (7th season)
Offensive coordinatorStan Parrish (2nd season)
Offensive schemeMultiple
Defensive coordinatorJim Herrmann (5th season)
Base defenseMultiple
MVPMarquise Walker
Captains
  • Eric Brackins
  • Shawn Thompson
Home stadiumMichigan Stadium
(Capacity: 107,501)
Seasons
← 2000
2002 →
2001 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
No. 12 Illinois $   7 1         10 2  
No. 20 Michigan   6 2         8 4  
Ohio State   5 3         7 5  
Iowa   4 4         7 5  
Purdue   4 4         6 6  
Penn State   4 4         5 6  
Indiana   4 4         5 6  
Michigan State   3 5         7 5  
Wisconsin   3 5         5 7  
Minnesota   2 6         4 7  
Northwestern   2 6         4 7  
  • $ – BCS representative as conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 2001 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team's head coach was Lloyd Carr. The Wolverines played their home games at Michigan Stadium.

Schedule[edit]

DateTimeOpponentRankSiteTVResultAttendance
September 13:30 p.m.Miami (OH)*No. 12/10ESPNW 31–13109,676
September 812:30 p.m.at No. 15/15 Washington*No. 11/10ABCL 18–2374,080
September 2212:10 p.m.Western Michigan*No. 20/17
  • Michigan Stadium
  • Ann Arbor, MI
ESPNW 38–21109,837
September 293:30 p.m.No. 22/23 IllinoisNo. 17/17
  • Michigan Stadium
  • Ann Arbor, MI
ABCW 45–20107,085
October 63:30 p.m.at Penn StateNo. 15/15ABCW 20–0107,879
October 1312:10 p.m.No. 17/16 PurduedaggerNo. 12/12
  • Michigan Stadium
  • Ann Arbor, MI
ESPNW 24–10110,450
October 272:30 p.m.at IowaNo. 8/8ABCW 32–2670,397
November 33:30 p.m.at Michigan StateNo. 6/6ABCL 24–2675,262
November 1012:10 p.m.MinnesotaNo. 12/13
ESPN2W 31–10110,828
November 172:30 p.m.at WisconsinNo. 11/11ABCW 20–1779,633
November 241:00 p.m.Ohio StateNo. 11/11
  • Michigan Stadium
  • Ann Arbor, MI (rivalry)
ABCL 20–26111,571
January 1, 20021:00 p.m.vs. No. 8/8 Tennessee*No. 17/15ABCL 17–4559,653

Roster[edit]

2001 Michigan Wolverines football team roster
Players Coaches
Offense
Pos. # Name Class
WR 19 Ronald Bellamy Jr
WR 80 Braylon Edwards Fr
OL 78 Jonathan Goodwin Sr
QB 7 Drew Henson Jr
TE 83 Bennie Joppru Jr
QB 16 John Navarre So
RB 23 Chris Perry So
WR 4 Marquise Walker Sr
Defense
Pos. # Name Class
LB 17 Larry Foote Sr
CB 3 Todd Howard Sr
FS 2 Cato June Jr
DL 53 Shantee Orr Jr
DE 85 Dave Spytek Fr
LB 31 John Spytek Jr
Special teams
Pos. # Name Class
Head coach
Coordinators/assistant coaches

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • (S) Suspended
  • (I) Ineligible
  • Injured Injured
  • Redshirt Redshirt

Roster

Statistical achievements[edit]

On October 27, Larry Foote earned a share of the single-game conference record of 7 tackles for a loss, becoming the third conference athlete to do so.[1] He also holds a share of the national record, becoming the third player to do so since the NCAA recognized it as a stat.[2]

Marquise Walker was the Big Ten receiving statistical champion with 7.5 receptions per conference game and 7.2 reception per game.[3] On September 8 against Washington and November 24 against Ohio State he posted 15 receptions breaking the record of 12 set in 1958 by Brad Myers and tied in 1996 by Tai Streets. The record still stands. During the season, he set the school record for single-season receptions (86), surpassing Jack Clancy's 1966 record of 76; career receptions (176), surpassing Anthony Carter's 161 set in 1982; consecutive games with a reception (32), surpassing Mercury Hayes's 30 set in 1995; and single-season reception yards, surpassing David Terrell's record set the prior season. Braylon Edwards surpassed all of these records in 2004.[4]

The team earned the Big Ten rushing defense statistical championships for all games by holding opponents to 89.1 yards per game.[5] The team also earned the Big Ten rushing defense statistical championships for conference games by holding opponents to 95.4 yards per game.[5] The team earned the Big Ten passing defense statistical championships for conference games by holding conference opponents to 190.8 yards per game, although Ohio State won the title for all games.[6] They also ranked first in passing efficiency defense for both conference games (103.5) and with Ohio State leading for all games.[6] The team led the conference in total defense for conference games (286.1) and all games (316.4).[6] The team led the Big Ten Conference in scoring defense for conference games (16.9 points per game) and all games (19.8).[7] They were the conference leaders in quarterback sacks for conference games (4.4 sacks per game) and all games (4.2 sacks per game).[7]

John Navarre set the school single-season pass attempts record of 385, surpassing 350 by Tom Brady in 1998. He would rebreak his own record in each of the next two seasons.[8]

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Co-captain: Eric Brackins, Shawn Thompson
  • All-Americans: Larry Foote, Marquise Walker
  • All-Conference: Larry Foote, Jonathan Goodwin, Dan Rumishek, Marquise Walker
  • Most Valuable Player: Marquise Walker
  • Meyer Morton Award: Bill Seymour
  • John Maulbetsch Award: Chris Perry
  • Frederick Matthei Award: Ronald Bellamy
  • Dick Katcher Award: Shantee Orr
  • Arthur Robinson Scholarship Award: Jake Frysinger
  • Hugh Rader Jr. Award: Kurt Anderson
  • Robert P. Ufer Award: Eric Brackins
  • Roger Zatkoff Award: Larry Foote

Coaching staff[edit]

Game summaries[edit]

Miami (OH)[edit]

Washington[edit]

Western Michigan[edit]

Illinois[edit]

Penn State[edit]

Purdue[edit]

Michigan State[edit]

Minnesota[edit]

1 234Total
Minnesota 0 1000 10
Michigan 7 7107 31

[9]

Wisconsin[edit]

1 234Total
Michigan 7 733 20
Wisconsin 7 0100 17

[10]

Ohio State[edit]

Citrus Bowl: Tennessee[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2009. p. 43. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  2. ^ "2009 Division I Football Records Book: Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 22. Retrieved July 9, 2010.
  3. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2009. p. 53. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  4. ^ "Record Book" (PDF). CBS Interactive. January 5, 2009. pp. 124–125. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  5. ^ a b "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2009. p. 56. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  6. ^ a b c "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2009. p. 57. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  7. ^ a b "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2009. p. 58. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  8. ^ "Record Book" (PDF). CBS Interactive. January 5, 2009. pp. 120–123. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  9. ^ "Minnesota vs. Michigan". USA Today. November 10, 2001. Retrieved September 23, 2014.
  10. ^ "Michigan vs. Wisconsin – Game Summary – November 17, 2001". ESPN.com. November 17, 2001. Retrieved November 13, 2017.

External links[edit]