1916 Michigan Wolverines football team

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1916 Michigan Wolverines football
1916 Michigan Wolverines football team.jpg
Conference Independent
1916 record 7–2
Head coach Fielding H. Yost (16th year)
Captain John Maulbetsch
Home stadium Ferry Field
Seasons
« 1915 1917 »
Team captain and left halfback John Maulbetsch led the team in scoring with 89 points.

The 1916 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1916 college football season. In his 16th year as head coach, Fielding H. Yost led Michigan to a 7–2 record, as the Wolverines outscored their opponents by a combined score of 253 to 56.[1] Michigan held its first five opponents to a combined total of three points and won its first seven games by a combined score of 227 to 23. The team then lost its final two games, each game by a margin of only three points, against Cornell and Penn.

Michigan's leading scorer was left halfback John Maulbetsch with 89 kicks for on 11 touchdowns, 20 points after touchdown (PAT) and a field goal. Maulbetsch was also the team's captain. Quarterback Cliff Sparks added 40 points on six touchdowns, one field goal and one PAT. New York sports writer Monty selected Sparks as the first-team quarterback on his 1916 College Football All-America Team.[2]

Schedule[edit]

Date Time Opponent Site Result Attendance
October 4, 1916 Marietta Ferry FieldAnn Arbor, MI W 38–0    
October 7, 1916 Case Ferry Field • Ann Arbor, MI W 19–3   2,906
October 11, 1916 Carroll Ferry Field • Ann Arbor, MI W 54–0    
October 14, 1916 Mount Union Ferry Field • Ann Arbor, MI W 26–0    
October 21, 1916 Michigan Agricultural Ferry Field • Ann Arbor, MI W 9–0   22,000
October 28, 1916 Syracuse Ferry Field • Ann Arbor, MI W 14–13    
November 4, 1916 Washington University in St. Louis Ferry Field • Ann Arbor, MI W 66–7    
November 11, 1916 at Cornell Schoellkopf FieldIthaca, NY L 20–23   6,000
November 18, 1916 Penndagger Ferry Field • Ann Arbor, MI L 7–10   25,584
daggerHomecoming. All times are in Eastern Time.

Season summary[edit]

Pre-season[edit]

Week 1: Marietta[edit]

Week 1: Marietta at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Marietta 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 7 14 7 10 38

On Wednesday, October 4, 1916, Michigan opened its season with a game at Ferry Field against Marietta College from Marietta, Ohio. The game was the second and final game against the Marietta Pioneers football team, with Michigan having defeated the Pioneers by a 28–6 score in 1915.[3]

Michigan defeated Marietta in the 1916 match by a 38–0 score. Quarterback Cliff Sparks scored three touchdownsF. The Detroit Free Press characterized Sparks' running as "one of the big features of the game."[4] Left halfback John Maulbetsch scored a touchdown, kicked a field goal from placement, and converted four of four attempts at kicks for point after touchdown (PAT) for a total of 13 points. Philip Raymond also scored a touchdown, and Frank Willard kicked a PAT. Marietta relied heavily on the forward pass and did so with some success. Early in the game, Marietta completed a pass, Whiting to Hayes, for a gain of 55 yards before being tackled by Sparks.[4][5]

The game was played in 12-minute quarters.[5] Michigan's starting lineup against Marietta was Maurice Dunne (left end), James Whalen (left tackle), Fred Rehor (left guard), Walter Niemann (center), R. Glenn Dunn (right guard), Richard Weske (right tackle), Willard Peach (right end), Cliff Sparks (quarterback), John Maulbetsch (left halfback), James Sharpe (right halfback), and Cedric "Pat" Smith (fullback). Substitutes appearing in the game for Michigan were Harry McCallum (left tackle), Albert Martens (left end), John Orton Goodsell (right guard), Frank Willard (center), Clifford Gracey (right tackle), Philip Raymond (fullback), Harold Zeiger (quarterback), Donald Bathrick (right halfback) Walter Johnson (right halfback), Clarence Skinner (left tackle), Hoyne Howe (right end), Orva Williams (left guard), Edward Biber (right guard), and N. J. Brazell (left halfback).[4][5]

Week 2: Case[edit]

Week 2: Case at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Case 3 0 0 0 3
Michigan 6 6 0 7 19

On Saturday, October 7, 1916, Michigan played its annual game against the team from Case Institute of Technology in Cleveland. The game was the 20th meeting between the schools in a series dating back to 1894. In the 19 prior meetings, Michigan won 18 games and played to a tie once.[6]

Michigan won the 1916 game by a 19–3 score. Case took the lead in the first quarter on a field goal from placement by Ashbaugh and led briefly. After Case scored, Michigan scored on its next drive. The drive featured a 25-yard run around left end by quarterback Cliff Sparks, a 15-yard run by left halfback John Maulbetsch, and a final touchdown plunge by fullback Cedric "Pat" Smith. In the second quarter, Maulbetsch helped set up the second score with a 30-yard punt return. A forward pass from Sparks to Maurice Dunne advanced the ball to the Case 20-yard line, and Sparks then ran around the left end for the touchdown. Michigan missed on both of its PAT attempts in the first half and led 12 to 3 at halftime. In the third quarter, Sparks returned a punt 60 yards, but fullback Philip Raymond fumbled after the ball had been advanced to the five-yard line. After an interception in the fourth quarter, Maulbetsch scored Michigan's final touchdown and kicked the PAT.[7][8]

Sparks was recognized as the star of the game. He ran for 115 yards in the game and set up a touchdown with a pass to left end Maurice Dunne for a 40-yard gain. The Detroit Free Press wrote: "The individual work of Sparks in his open field running and all-around generalship easily stood out as the brightest feature to the somewhat disappointing tussle."[7] The Michigan Alumnus wrote of Sparks: "[H]e looks like the real find of the season. He was the hardest man on the team to stop, and his dodging runs from punt formation gained many yards for Michigan."[8]

The game was played in 12-1/2 minute quarters. Michigan's starting lineup against Case was Dunne (left end), James Whalen (left tackle), Fred Rehor (left guard), Walter Niemann (center), R. Glenn Dunn (right guard), Richard Weske (right tackle), Willard Peach (right end), Sparks (quarterback), Maulbetsch (left halfback), Donald Bathrick (right halfback), and Smith (fullback). Substitutes appearing in the game for Michigan were N. J. Brazell (right halfback), Albert Martens (left end), Philip Raymond (fullback), James Sharpe (right halfback), Frank Willard (center), and Harry McCallum (left tackle).[7][8]

Week 3: Carroll[edit]

Week 3: Carroll at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Carroll College 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 20 14 13 7 54

On Wednesday, October 11, 1916, Michigan played its second mid-week game against the football team from Carroll College in Waukesha, Wisconsin. The game was the first and only meeting between the schools.[9][10]

Quarterback Cliff Sparks, playing only in the first half, scored two touchdowns, "circled the ends at will", averaged almost 20 yards per carry when running from punt formation, and threw a 25-yard pass to left end Maurice Dunne. Dunne caught three passes in the game, including one in the second half that was good for a touchdown. Additional touchdowns were scored by John Maulbetsch, N. J. Brazell, Joseph Hanish, Harold Zeiger, and Philip Raymond. Maulbetsch also successfully converted six of eight kicks for points after touchdown, and Zeiger returned a punt 47 yards in the second half. Carroll did not manage its first and only first down until the fourth quarter against Michigan's substitutes.[11] The game was played in quarters lasting 12, 12, 10 and 5 minutes. As the game lasted only 39 minutes, Michigan scored an average almost 1-1/2 points per minute.[11]

Michigan's starting lineup against Carroll was Dunne (left end), Elton Wieman (left tackle), Alan Boyd (left guard), Walter Niemann (center), John Ortonn Goodsell (right guard), Richard Weske (right tackle), Willard Peach (right end), Sparks (quarterback), Maulbetsch (left halfback), Brazell (right halfback), and Philip Raymond (fullback). Substitutes appearing in the game for Michigan included Albert Martens (right end), Hanish (fullback), Zeiger (quarterback), Cedric "Pat" Smith (fullback), Frank Willard (center), Donald Bathrick, Clarence Skinner (right guard), Roland G. Dunn (right guard), Alvin Loucks (left end), Edward Biber (left halfback), and Harry McCallum (left tackle). Smith did not start due to a sprained finger. Fred Rehor was held out of the game due to a minor injury sustained during a practice scrimmage.[11][12]

Week 4: Mount Union[edit]

Week 4: Mount Union at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Mount Union 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 6 6 7 7 26

On Saturday, October 14, 1916, Michigan played the football team Mount Union College of Alliance, Ohio. The game was the fourth game between the two schools since 1913, with Michigan winning the prior games by a combined score of 76 to 7.[13]

Michigan won the 1916 game at Ferry Field by a 26–0 score. Michigan touchdowns were scored by left halfback John Maulbetsch, center Walter Niemann, right halfback N. J. Brazell, and fullback Cedric "Pat" Smith. Maulbetsch and Frank Willard each kicked one point after touchdown. Brazell's touchdown came on an interception that he returned 65 yards. Nieman's touchdown came when he recovered Maulbetsch's fumble across the goal line.[14]

The game was played in 15-minute quarters. Michigan's starting lineup against Mount Union was Maurice Dunne (left end), Elton Wieman (left tackle), Alan Boyd (left guard), Niemann (center), Fred Rehor (right guard), Richard Weske (right tackle), Willard Peach (right end), Sparks (quarterback), Maulbetsch (left halfback), Harold Zeiger (right halfback), and Joseph Hanish (fullback). Substitutes appearing in the game for Michigan were Smith (fullback), Brazell (right halfback), John Orton Goodsell (left guard), Albert Martens (left end), Philip Raymond (fullback), Sidney Eggert (left halfback), Frank Willard (center), James Whalen (right tackle), Clifford Gracey (right guard), Harry McCallum (left tackle), Alvin Loucks (right end), and Clarence Skinner (left guard).[14][15]

Week 5: Michigan Agricultural[edit]

Week 5: Michigan Agricultural at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan Agricultural 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 3 0 0 6 9
Coach Yost called the unplanned drop-kick field goal by Cliff Sparks (pictured) "the greatest individual play ever seen in my whole career".

Michigan played its annual game against Michigan Agricultural College at Ferry Field on October 21, 1916. It was the 11th game between the two schools dating back to 1898. Michigan had won seven of the prior ten games, but M.A.C. had defeated the Wolverines in 1915.[16]

Michigan won the 1916 game by a score of 9–0. According to one account of the game, Michigan quarterback Cliff Sparks "crumpled the Aggie line almost every time he crashed into it and circled ends with ease, and was eel-like in running back punts."[17] The play that drew the most attention was Sparks' drop-kick on a broken play that gave Michigan a 3-0 lead in the first quarter.[18] The play called for Sparks to take the snap from center and hold the ball for a field goal attempt. The snap from center was high, forcing Sparks to react quickly. One press account described Sparks' actions as follows:

"And then seemingly with a single movement, Sparks jumped to his feet, grabbed the ball as it was about to clear his head, whirled to face the goal posts and drop-kicked the ball over the Aggie bar for a count of three points, which then and there cinched the game for the Wolverines. 'It was the greatest individual play ever seen in my whole career as coach or player,' was 'Hurry Up' Yost's comment after the game. And every person in the crowd who saw Sparks plan and execute that play in something less than two seconds chanted 'Amen!'"[17]

Following the broken play in the first quarter, Sparks sought to confuse the Aggie defense by signaling for a kick formation several times, and on each occasion Sparks did something else "to the utter bewilderment of the Aggies."[17]

After two scoreless quarters, M.A.C's Baker in the fourth quarter fumbled a punt at M.A.C.'s 22-yard line. After gains of 10 yards by Sparks and eight yards by Cedric "Pat" Smith, left halfback John Maulbetsch finished the drive with a two-yard run for the touchdown. Left end Maurice Dunne missed the kick for point after touchdown.[19]

The game was played in 15-minute quarters. Michigan's starting lineup against M.A.C. was Maurice Dunne (left end), Elton Wieman (left tackle), Alan Boyd (left guard), Walter Niemann (center), Fred Rehor (right guard), Richard Weske (right tackle), Willard Peach (right end), Sparks (quarterback), Maulbetsch (left halfback), Philip Raymond (right halfback), and Smith (fullback). Substitutes appearing in the game for Michigan were Clifford Gracey (left guard), Joseph Hanish (right halfback), Bathrick (right halfback), and Sidney Eggert (left halfback).[19][20]

Week 6: Syracuse[edit]

Week 6: Syracuse at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Syracuse 3 10 0 0 13
Michigan 0 0 0 14 14

Michigan played its annual game against Syracuse University at Ferry Field on October 28, 1916. After leaving the Big Ten Conference, Michigan began playing an annual game against Syracuse. The 1916 game was the ninth game dating back to 1908. Michigan had compiled a 3-4-1 record in the prior eight games.[21]

Michigan won the 1916 game by a score of 14–13. Syracuse jumped to a 13–0 lead, but Michigan came back with 14 points in the fourth quarter. After an injury sidelined quarterback Cliff Sparks earlier in the game, backup Harold Zeiger scored both touchdowns, and left halfback John Maulbetsch converted both kicks for points after touchdown. The first touchdown, with four minutes remaining in the game, resulted in a holding penalty moved the ball to the Syracuse six-yard line. After two unsuccessful line plays, the Wolverines lined up for a fake field goal, and Zeiger picked up the ball and ran around the right side for a touchdown. With two minutes remaining, Maurice Dunne intercepted a Syracuse pass at the 45-yard line. Cedric Smith threw to Dunne for 33 yards, and Syracuse was then penalized when Syracuse's coach Hollenbach stepped onto the field. The penalty advanced the ball to Syracuse's six-yard line. On second down, Zeiger ran four yards for a touchdown.[22][23] With the game riding on the attempt at extra point, "Maulbetsch took his time, finally kicking the ball squarely between the uprights."[22] The Michigan Alumnus wrote that Michigan's comeback, occurring in the final seven minutes of the game, "will go down in Michigan history."[24]

The game was played in 15-minute quarters. Michigan's starting lineup against Syracuse was Maurice Dunne (left end), Elton Wieman (left tackle), Clifford Gracey (left guard), Walter Niemann (center), Fred Rehor (right guard), Richard Weske (right tackle), Willard Peach (right end), Cliff Sparks (quarterback), Maulbetsch (left halfback), Philip Raymond (right halfback), and Cedric "Pat" Smith (fullback). Substitutes appearing in the game for Michigan were Zeiger (quarterback), Alan Boyd (left guard), Albert Martens (right end), Hanish (right halfback), and John Orton Goodsell (right guard).[22][23]

Week 7: Washington University[edit]

Week 7: Washington University at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Washington U. 0 7 0 0 7
Michigan 6 20 13 27 66

On November 4, 1916, Michigan played the team from Washington University in St. Louis at Ferry Field. The game was the first and last meeting between the two programs. Washington University's head coach at the time was Bill Edmunds, a Michigan alumnus who had played for coach Yost's teams from 1908 to 1910.[25]

The Wolverines defeated the Washington University Bears by a score of 66 to 7. John Maulbetsch led the attack for Michigan, scoring five touchdowns and kicking four extra points for 34 points. Quarterback Harold Zeiger scored two touchdowns, including a 45-yard run for touchdown, while Philip Raymond, N. J. Brazell and Joseph A. Hanish scored one touchdown each. Fred Rehor kicked two extra points.[25] Raymond handled the punting for Michigan and had one punt that "with the wind behind it carried 70 yards on the fly."[25]

Washington's touchdown came in the second quarter when Zeiger fumbled the ball while attempting a forward pass. Washington's left end Kling picked up the loose ball and returned it 40 yards for the score. On offense, Washington did not make a single first down by rushing, gaining less than 25 yards from scrimmage in the game.[25]

The game was played in 15-minute quarters. Michigan's starting lineup was Maurice Dunne (left end), Elton Wieman (left tackle), Alan Boyd (left guard), Walter Niemann (center), Rehor (right guard), Richard Weske (right tackle), Willard Peach (right end), Harold Zeiger (quarterback), Maulbetsch (left halfback), Raymond (right halfback), and Cedric Smith (fullback). Substitutes appearing in the game for Michigan were R. Glenn Dunn, John Orton Goodsell, Albert Martens, Hanish, James Whalen, Clarence Skinner, Harry McCallum, Alvin Loucks, Sidney Eggert, Brazell, and Frank Willard.[25]

Week 8: at Cornell[edit]

Week 8: Michigan at Cornell
1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 0 14 6 0 20
Cornell 6 0 7 10 23

Michigan traveled to Ithaca, New York, for the team's only road game against Cornell. The game was the 14th meeting of the teams dating back to 1889. Michigan had won only three of the prior 13 meetings.[26]

Michigan lost the 1916 game by a 23-20 score. Cornell quarterback Fritz Shiverick, who was later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, dropkicked two field goals in the first quarter to give the Big Red a 6 to 0 lead. In the second quarter, Michigan's left halfback John Maulbetsch ran for a touchdown and kicked the point after touchdown to put Michigan in the lead. Also in the second quarter, fullback Cedric "Pat" Smith ran for a touchdown with Maulbetsch again converting the extra point to put Michigan ahead, 14-6 at halftime. On a trick play in the third quarter, quarterback Harold Zeiger passed back to right end Willard Peach who then threw a 40-yard touchdown pass to left end Maurice Dunne. Maulbetsch missed the extra point, and Michigan led 20-6. Later in the third quarter, Cornell fullback Mueller ran for a touchdown, and Shiverick kicked the extra point to reduce the lead to 20-13. Early in the fourth quarter, Cornell tied the score at 20-20 on a second touchdown run by Mueller and another extra point by Shiverick. Shiverick then added his third drop-kicked field goal to give Cornell the victory.[27]

The game was played in 15-minute quarters. Michigan's starting lineup against Cornell was Maurice Dunne (left end), Elton Wieman (left tackle), Clifford Gracey (left guard), Walter Niemann (center), Fred Rehor (right guard), Richard Weske (right tackle), Willard Peach (right end), Harold Zeiger (quarterback), Maulbetsch (left halfback), Raymond (right halfback), and Smith (fullback). Substitutes appearing in the game for Michigan included Alan Boyd (left guard).[27]

Week 9: Penn[edit]

Week 7: Penn at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Penn 7 3 0 0 10
Michigan 0 0 0 7 7
Singing The Yellow and the Blue between halves of the Penn Game, November 1916

On November 18, 1916, Michigan played its annual rivalry game against the Penn Quakers football team. The game was the 12th meeting between the teams dating back to 1899. After leaving the Big Ten Conference, Penn became Michigan's regular season-ending rivalry game. In the 11 prior meetings, Michigan had won only four times, with the two teams playing to a scoreless tie in 1915.[28]

Penn won the 1916 game by a 10–7 score. Penn scored a touchdown by Howard Berry in the first quarter and a field goal by Derr in the second quarter and led 10 to 0 at halftime. In the fourth quarter, Michigan fullback Cedric Smith scored a touchdown for Michigan, and left halfback John Maulbetsch kicked the point after touchdown.[29] The Michigan Alumnus wrote that Penn's star halfback Berry had been permitted to end his military career on the Mexican border in order to allow him to return to the Penn football team.[30]

The game was played in 15-minute quarters. Michigan's starting lineup against Penn was Maurice Dunne (left end), Elton Wieman (left tackle), Alan Boyd (left guard), Walter Niemann (center), Rehor (right guard), Richard Weske (right tackle), Willard Peach (right end), Cliff Sparks (quarterback), Maulbetsch (left halfback), Philip Raymond (right halfback), and Smith (fullback). Substitutes appearing in the game for Michigan were Albert Martens (right end) and Harold Zeiger (quarterback).[29][31]

Players[edit]

Varsity letter winners[edit]

  • Alan W. Boyd[32] - started 5 games at left guard
  • Maurice F. Dunne[33] - started 9 games at left end
  • Clifford C. Gracey[34] - started 2 games at left guard
  • Albert C. Martens - right end
  • John Maulbetsch - started 9 games at left halfback
  • Walter Niemann - started 9 games at center
  • Willard L. Peach[35] - started 9 games at right end
  • Philip T. Raymond,[36] - started 5 games at right halfback, 1 game at fullback
  • Fred Rehor - started 6 games at right guard, 2 games at left guard
  • Cedric C. Smith - started 7 games at fullback
  • Cliff Sparks - started 7 games at quarterback
  • Richard F. "Dick" Weske[37] - started 9 games at right tackle
  • Elton Wieman - started 7 games at left tackle
  • Harold M. Zeiger[38] - started 2 games at quarterback, 1 game at right halfback

aMa letter winners[edit]

  • Nicholas J. Brazell, Jr.,[39] - started 1 game at right halfback
  • Roland G. Dunn[40] - started 2 games at right guard
  • Sidney V. Eggert - left halfback
  • John O. Goodsell[41] - started 1 game at right guard
  • Joseph Anthony Hanish[42] - started 1 game at fullback
  • Alvin Loucks - right halfback
  • Harry B. McCallum - left tackle
  • James H. Sharpe,[43] - started 1 game at right halfback
  • Clarence O. Skinner - right guard
  • Jim Whalen[44] - started 2 game at left tackle
  • Frank A. Willard - center

Others[edit]

  • Donald U. Bathrick,[45] - started 1 game at right halfback (reserve player)

Scoring leaders[edit]

Player Touchdowns Extra points Field goals Total
Points
John Maulbetsch 11 20 1 89
Cliff Sparks 6 0 1 39
Harold Zeiger 5 0 0 30
Cedric "Pat" Smith 4 0 0 24
Philip Raymond 3 0 0 18
Nicholas J. Brazell 3 0 0 18
Joseph Hanish 2 0 0 12
Maurice Dunne 1 0 0 6
Walter Niemann 1 0 0 6
Fred Rehor 0 2 0 2
Frank Willard 0 2 0 2
unaccounted 1 0 0 6
Totals 37 24 2 252

Awards and honors[edit]

Coaching staff[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1916 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved April 29, 2015. 
  2. ^ Monty (November 25, 1916). "All American Is Selected by Monty: Talent Stands Out". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. 
  3. ^ "Michigan vs Marietta (OH)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved April 30, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c "Wolverines Win Opener by 38 to 0: Shut Out Marietta College in First Game of Season--Squad Shows Up Well--Yost Tries Out All of Youngsters; Losers Threaten to Score on First Play; If Sparks Had Not Been in Way, Ohioans Would Have Counted at Start on Hayes's 55-Yard Gain With Pass From Whiting". Detroit Free Press. October 5, 1916. p. 14. 
  5. ^ a b c "Michigan, 38; Marietta, O". The Michigan Alumnus. October 1916. pp. 41–42. 
  6. ^ "Michigan vs Case Institute of Technology (OH)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved April 30, 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c "Yost Team Has Battle With Case: Clevelanders Hold Michigan Gridders to 19 to 3 Score--Smith, Sparks and Maulbetsch Go Over for 3 Touchdowns; Generalship and Play of Sparks Is Feature; Gains Consistently and Handles Wolverines in Fine Shape-Ashbaugh, of Case, Prevents Shutout by Kicking Field Goal". Detroit Free Press. October 8, 1916. p. 19. 
  8. ^ a b c "Michigan, 19; Case, 3". The Michigan Alumnus. November 1916. p. 100. 
  9. ^ "Michigan vs Carroll (WI)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved April 30, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Carroll Is Stranger To Wolverines; Michiganders May Be Forced to Play Some Good Football to Win From Wisconsin on Ferry Field Wednesday". Detroit Free Press. October 8, 1916. 
  11. ^ a b c "Michigan's Eleven in Good Form: Yost's Warriors Wallop Carroll College by 54 to 0 in One Sided Game on Ferry Field--Scrubs Play During Game. Improvement in Work of Team All Around; Sparks, Maulbetsch and Zeiger Carry Ball for Long Gains and Provide Features--Smith and Rehor on Sidelines". Detroit Free Press. October 12, 1916. p. 14. 
  12. ^ "Michigan, 54; Carroll, O". The Michigan Alumnus. November 1916. pp. 100–101. 
  13. ^ "Michigan vs Mount Union (OH)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved April 30, 2015. 
  14. ^ a b "Michigan, 26; Mount Union, 0". The Michigan Alumnus. November 1916. 
  15. ^ "Michigan's Pegs Trim Mt. Union: Yostmen Handle Forward Passes in Better Shape Than at Any Time This Season, Resulting in 26-0 Victory; Ohio Gridders Make Good on Expectations; Wolverine Fans Who Figured on Seeing a Good Game of Football Not Disappointed--Regulars Used in Backfield". Detroit Free Press. October 15, 1916. p. 19. 
  16. ^ "Michigan vs Michigan St.". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved April 30, 2015. 
  17. ^ a b c "Wolverines Uncover a Phenomenal Quarterback". San Antonio Light. 1916-11-12. 
  18. ^ "Michigan Succeeds Over Aggie Eleven". The Salt Lake Tribune. 1916-10-22. 
  19. ^ a b E. E. Pardee (October 22, 1916). "It Was Just As Well For Michigan That She Had Sparks: Jackson Boy's Thinking Gives Her a Lead and His All Around Work Holds It". Detroit Free Press. p. 23. 
  20. ^ "Michigan, 9; M.A.C., 0". The Michigan Alumnus. November 1916. pp. 102–103. 
  21. ^ "Michigan vs Syracuse". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved April 30, 2015. 
  22. ^ a b c "Michigan-Syracuse Battle Just As It Was Played". Detroit Free Press. October 29, 1916. p. 22. 
  23. ^ a b "Michigan, 14; Syracuse, 13". The Michigan Alumnus. November 1916. pp. 103–104. 
  24. ^ "Certain Aspects of the M.A.C. and Syracuse Games". The Michigan Alumnus. November 1916. p. 58. 
  25. ^ a b c d e E. A. Batchelor (November 5, 1916). "Wolverines Overwhelm Washington: Coach Yost's Eleven Runs Over St. Louis University Team, Rolling Up Sixty-six Points Against Seven". Detroit Free Press. p. 19. 
  26. ^ "Michigan vs Cornell (NY)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved April 30, 2015. 
  27. ^ a b E. E. Pardee (November 12, 1916). "Michigan's Defeat Told Play By Play". Detroit Free Press. p. 21. 
  28. ^ "Michigan vs Pennsylvania". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved April 30, 2015. 
  29. ^ a b "Michigan's Defeat and Pennsy's Victory Told In Detail: Somebody Had To Win And It Happened To Be The Quakers On This Occasion". The Detroit Free Press. November 19, 1916. p. 20. 
  30. ^ "A Review of the Football Season". The Michigan Alumnus. December 1916. pp. 151–158. 
  31. ^ "Pennsylvania, 10; Michigan, 7". The Michigan Alumnus. December 1916. pp. 161–163. 
  32. ^ Alan W. Boyd, born March 11, 1897, Indianapolis, Indiana. He was awarded the medal for being Michigan's best athlete and student for the year 1917-1918. He became a lawyer practicing in Indiana. He died in May 1987 in Indianapolis.
  33. ^ Maurice Francis Dunne, born March 12, 1895, River Forest, Illinois. His father, Edward F. Dunne, was the mayor of Chicago from 1905 to 1907 and Governor of Illinois from 1913 to 1917. After graduating from Michigan, he became a lawyer practicing in Chicago. He was also the proprietor of a business manufacturing foundry tools. He died in August 1974 at Evanston, Illinois.
  34. ^ Clifford Chester Gracey, born December 18, 1891, Jarvis, Ontario, Canada. His family moved to Elkland Township, Michigan while he was a child. At the time of the 1930 Census, he was living in Detroit, Michigan with his wife and two daughters, and working as a school teacher. He died at Plymouth, Michigan, in July 1950.
  35. ^ Willard L. Peach (middle name listed as Levi in early records, later as Lawrence), born June 23, 1895, Fremont, Ohio. At the time of the 1930 Census, he was living in Detroit and working as an automobile salesman. He died March 30, 1975, Birmingham, Michigan.
  36. ^ Philip Titus Raymond, born July 29, 1894, Dundee, Michigan. He served as an ensign in the engineering branch of the U.S. Navy during World War I. He was the superintendent of a construction company in Saginaw, Michigan in 1921. In 1930, he was living in Miami, Florida, working as an engineer in building construction. He died January 16, 1966, El Cajon, California.
  37. ^ Richard Ferdinand Weske, sometimes listed as Ferdinand Richard Weske, born August 15, 1894, in Petrograd, Russia (now known as Saint Petersburg. He came to the United States in June 1903 with his parents, Peter and Agnela Weske, and sister, Juliana. He was raised in New London, Connecticut. At the time of the 1910 Census, he was living in New London with his father, Peter (a 41-year-old machinist), and sister Juliana (age 14). He became a naturalized U.S. citizen and enrolled at the University of Michigan as an engineering student. At the time of the 1930 Census, he was living in Salt Lake City with his wife Wanda, daughters Jacqueline and Juliana, and was working as a civil engineer for a railroad. He died in October 1971 in Nevada City, Nevada.
  38. ^ Harold Morris Zeiger, born December 8, 1895 in Colorado. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War I. At the time of the 1920 Census, he lived in Long Beach, California, and working as a salesman of auto supplies. In 1930, he was living in Long Beach, working as a petroleum inspector. He died October 12, 1984, Rialto, California.
  39. ^ Nicholas Joseph Brazell, Jr., born October 26, 1895, Tacoma, Washington. He attended the University of Michigan as a student in marine engineering. He became a noted naval engineer specializing in propulsion. He gained acclaim in the 1950s for his design of a propeller resistant to wear.
  40. ^ Roland Glen Dunn, born August 22, 1892, St. Johns, Michigan. He became a lawyer in Muskegon Heights, Michigan. He ran as a Republican candidate for Congress in 1928. He also served as legal aid to Michigan Governor Frank Fitzgerald, assistant state attorney general, and chairman of the Michigan State Liquor Control Commission. His papers are kept at the Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan. He died in April 1972 at Mason, Michigan.
  41. ^ John Orton Goodsell, Jr., born September 29, 1897, Lowell, Michigan. He became an oral surgeon, practicing in Saginaw, Michigan, starting in approximately 1922. He died in January 1977 at Saginaw.
  42. ^ Joseph Anthony Hanish, born January 11, 1896, Grand Rapids, Michigan. At the outbreak of World War II, he was living in Oak Park, Illinois, working for Buick Motor Division. He died March 1984 in Grand Rapids, Michigan.
  43. ^ James Harrison Sharpe, born October 26, 1896, Sault Ste Marie, Michigan. He served in the U.S. Field Artillery Service in France from October to December 1918. He worked as a mechanical engineer in Sault Ste. Marie. He died at Lakewood, Ohio, June 30, 1957.
  44. ^ James Lawrence Whalen, born January 17, 1893, Savannah, New York. He was a student at Michigan when the U.S. entered World War I. He entered Ft. Sheridan R.O.T.C. as a reserve officer. He served as a 2nd Lieutenant with the American Expeditionary Forces in France.
  45. ^ Donald Upton Bathrick, born March 4, 1893, Battle Creek, Michigan. He lived in Battle Creek with his parents, Charles and Grace Bathrick, at the time of the 1900 and 1910 Censuses. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I. At the time of the 1920 Census, he was living in Houston, Texas, and working as a sales manager for an auto distributor. In 1930, he was living in Bloomfield Township, Michigan, and working in the wholesale automobile business. He worked for Ford and later for General Motors. He became general sales manager of the Pontiac division of General Motors. He also served as the head of General Motors' office in Washington, D.C., during World War II. He died September 24, 1972, Broward County, Florida.
  46. ^ Monty (1916-11-25). "All American is Selected by Monty: Talent Stands Out". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. 
  47. ^ "Yost's 1916 All American". Mansfield News. 1916-12-27. 

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