Antimony telluride

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Antimony telluride
Names
Other names
antimony telluride, antimony(III) telluride, antimony telluride, diantimony tritelluride
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.014.074
Properties
Sb2Te3
Molar mass 626.32 g·mol−1
Appearance grey solid
Density 6.50 g cm−3[1]
Melting point 620 °C (1,148 °F; 893 K)[1]
Hazards
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
TWA 0.5 mg/m3 (as Sb)[2]
REL (Recommended)
TWA 0.5 mg/m3 (as Sb)[2]
Related compounds
Other anions
Sb2O3
Sb2S3
Sb2Se3
Other cations
As2Te3
Bi2Te3
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Antimony telluride is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula Sb2Te3. It is a grey, crystalline solid, although its melting point, density and colour may depend on the crystalline form it adopts.

Synthesis[edit]

Antimony telluride can be formed by the reaction of antimony with tellurium at 500–900 °C.[1]

2Sb(l) + 3Te(l) → Sb2Te3(l)

Applications[edit]

Like other binary chalcogenides of antimony and bismuth, Sb2Te3 has been investigated for its semiconductor properties. It can be transformed into both n-type and p-type semiconductors by doping with an appropriate dopant.[1]

Sb2Te3 forms the pseudobinary intermetallic system germanium-antimony-tellurium with germanium telluride, GeTe.[3]

Like bismuth telluride, Bi2Te3, antimony telluride has a large thermoelectric effect and is therefore used in solid state refrigerators.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Greenwood, Norman N.; Earnshaw, Alan (1997). Chemistry of the Elements (2nd ed.). Butterworth-Heinemann. pp. 581–582. ISBN 0-08-037941-9. 
  2. ^ a b "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0036". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 
  3. ^ Wełnic, Wojciech; Wuttig, Matthias (2008). "Reversible switching in phase-change materials". Materials Today. 11 (6): 20–27. doi:10.1016/S1369-7021(08)70118-4.