Australian Chess Championship

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Australian Chess Championship is a tournament organised by the Australian Chess Federation and held every two years. The tournament is largely restricted to Australian chess players, although it is common to allow a small number of strong overseas players to compete. The highest-scoring eligible player (frequently the tournament winner) holds the title of Australian Chess Champion until the next tournament is held. The tournament format is normally a restricted Swiss system, and in case of a tie for first place, a playoff match or tournament is conducted.

Since 1971, the Australian Open has been held in the intervening years. This event is open to all players, regardless of nationality, and the winner holds the title of Australian Open Champion.

The Australian Junior Championship and Australian Girls Championship are held annually. The Australian Women's Championship was previously organised as a separate tournament but current regulations award the title of Australian Women's Champion to the highest placed Australian female player in the Australian Open (dependent on a minimum number of female entries).[1]

Australian Champions[edit]

Prior to 2008, the tournament usually began in late December (after Christmas) and finished in January. Since 2008, the tournament has usually been held entirely in January. In the table, the year refers to the date the tournament finished.

Year Location Winners
1885 Melbourne Frederick Karl Esling (won one match game before George Hatfeild Dingley Gossip defaulted)
1887 Adelaide Henry Charlick
1888 Melbourne William Crane
1893 Sydney Albert Edward Noble Wallace
1895 Melbourne Albert Edward Noble Wallace
1896 Sydney Albert Edward Noble Wallace
1897(1) Warnambool William Crane
1897(2) Sydney Julius Leigh Jacobsen
1906 Perth William Samuel Viner
1912 Sydney William Samuel Viner
1913 Bellingen William Samuel Viner
1922 Melbourne Charles Gilbert Marriott Watson
1924 Brisbane William Samuel Viner
1926 Sydney Spencer Crakanthorp
1927 Perth Spencer Crakanthorp
1931 Melbourne Charles Gilbert Marriott Watson
1933 Sydney Gary Koshnitsky
1935 Melbourne C.J.S. Purdy
1937 Perth C.J.S. Purdy
1939 Sydney Gary Koshnitsky
1945 Sydney Lajos Steiner
1947 Adelaide Lajos Steiner
1949 Melbourne C.J.S. Purdy
1951 Brisbane C.J.S. Purdy
1953 Hobart Lajos Steiner
1955 Perth John Purdy
1957 Melbourne Karlis Ozols / Lazare Suchowolski (Suchowolski emigrated to Israel before a playoff could be arranged)
1959 Hobart Lajos Steiner
1960 Adelaide Lucius Endzelins
1963 Perth John Purdy
1965 Hobart Douglas G. Hamilton
1967 Brisbane Douglas G. Hamilton
1969 Melbourne Walter Browne
1970 Sydney Alfred Flatow
1972 Melbourne Maxwell Fuller / Trevor Hay (playoff match tied 5–5)[2]
1974 Cooma Robert Murray Jamieson
1976 Sydney Serge Rubanraut
1978 Perth Robert Murray Jamieson
1980 Adelaide Ian Rogers
1982 Melbourne Douglas G. Hamilton
1984 Sydney Darryl Johansen
1986 Toowoomba Ian Rogers
1988 Gosford Darryl Johansen
1990 Sydney Darryl Johansen
1992 Melbourne Aleksandar Wohl
1994 Melbourne John-Paul Wallace
1996 Sydney Guy West
1998 Melbourne Ian Rogers
2000 Tumbi Umbi Darryl Johansen
2002 Melbourne Darryl Johansen
2004 Adelaide Gary Lane
2006 Brisbane Ian Rogers
2008 Parramatta Stephen Solomon[3]
2010 North Sydney Zong-Yuan Zhao
2012 Geelong Darryl Johansen
2014 Springvale Max Illingworth
2016 Melbourne Bobby Cheng

Australian Women's Champions[edit]

Australian Junior Champions[edit]

The Australian Junior Chess Championship is a tournament organised by the Australian Chess Federation and is held every year. It is restricted to junior amateurs under 18 years of age. The Australian Girls Championship is held concurrently.

Australian Girls Champions[edit]

Australian Open[edit]

Australian Grand Prix[edit]

Since 1989 a system has been in place with points accumulated in different Australian weekend tournaments. The winners have been:[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Australian Chess Federation Constitution and By-laws
  2. ^ Australian Chess Championship 1974 – 100 Best Games, Edited by W. MacLean, published by Chess Mates of Australia, October 1974
  3. ^ Crowther, Mark (14 January 2008), THE WEEK IN CHESS 688: Australian Championships 2007-8, London Chess Center 
  4. ^ Chess in Australia, February 1975
  5. ^ 2007 Myer Tan Australian Chess Grand Prix – History Archived March 26, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.

External links[edit]