Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania

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Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania
City of Beaver Falls
View of Beaver Falls, from the borough of New Brighton.
View of Beaver Falls, from the borough of New Brighton.
Nicknames: 
Birthplace of College Basketball
Location in Beaver County and the U.S. state of Pennsylvania.
Location in Beaver County and the U.S. state of Pennsylvania.
Coordinates: 40°45′32″N 80°19′11″W / 40.75889°N 80.31972°W / 40.75889; -80.31972Coordinates: 40°45′32″N 80°19′11″W / 40.75889°N 80.31972°W / 40.75889; -80.31972
CountryUnited States
StatePennsylvania
CountyBeaver County
IncorporatedNovember 9, 1868 (borough)
Government
 • MayorGeorge Quay (interim)
Area
 • Total2.35 sq mi (6.09 km2)
 • Land2.13 sq mi (5.51 km2)
 • Water0.22 sq mi (0.58 km2)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total8,987
 • Estimate 
(2019)[2]
8,332
 • Density3,915.41/sq mi (1,511.77/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP Code
15010
FIPS code42-04792
WebsiteCity website

Beaver Falls is a city in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 8,987 at the 2010 census. It is located 31 miles (50 km) northwest of Pittsburgh, and on the Beaver River, six miles (9 km) north of its confluence with the Ohio River.

History[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18703,112
18805,10464.0%
18909,73590.7%
190010,0543.3%
191012,19121.3%
192012,8025.0%
193017,14733.9%
194017,098−0.3%
195017,3751.6%
196016,240−6.5%
197014,635−9.9%
198012,525−14.4%
199010,687−14.7%
20009,920−7.2%
20108,987−9.4%
2019 (est.)8,332[2]−7.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[3]

In the 1870s, Beaver Falls was home to a Chinatown and had up to 225 Chinese residents, brought in to work at Beaver Falls Cutlery Company.[4][5]

On May 31, 1985, an F3 tornado hit just north of the city as it went across northern portions of Beaver County, as part of the 1985 United States-Canadian tornado outbreak.[6]

The population declined nearly 50% between 1940 and 2000, which is attributed mostly to its central location in the Rust Belt.[7][8][9]

Geography[edit]

Beaver Falls is located at 40°45′32″N 80°19′11″W / 40.75889°N 80.31972°W / 40.75889; -80.31972 (40.758865, -80.319737).[10]

Demographics[edit]

Beaver Falls Municipal Authority

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 9,920 people, 3,798 households, and 2,259 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,681.6 people per square mile (1,806.7/km2). There were 4,380 housing units at an average density of 2,067.1 per square mile (797.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 78.82% White, 17.53% African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.62% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 2.37% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.06% of the population.

Notable people[edit]

Neighborhoods[edit]

A view of Downtown Beaver Falls in 2013.

Sites of interest[edit]

Carnegie Library

Transportation[edit]

Air[edit]

The closest airport to the city is Beaver County Airport. Though located in Allegheny County, Pittsburgh International Airport is within close proximity of Beaver Falls, and is easily accessible by way of I-376 (former PA 60).[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  3. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  4. ^ "Chinese Workers In Beaver Falls". Archived from the original on 2011-06-09.
  5. ^ Anon (1993). "Gone but not forgotten: the Beaver Falls Cutlery Company". Industrious Beaver Falls. Darlington, Pennsylvania: Beaver County Industrial Museum. This is based on Anon (1992). "The history and lore of Beaver Co.: the Chinese in Beaver Falls 1872". The Beaver Countian Vol III no.1. Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania. pp. 1–3.
  6. ^ Britten, Kenneth, Beaver Falls Gem of Beaver County, Arcadia Publishing, 2002, ISBN 0-7385-2382-8.
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-03-27. Retrieved 2017-12-07.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-05-05. Retrieved 2017-12-07.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ https://www.census.gov/prod/cen1990/cph2/cph-2-1-1.pdf
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  12. ^ Wilson, Earl (Nov 27, 1969). "Small Towns Have Produced Many Big Stars". The Milwaukee Sentinel. pp. A33. Retrieved 22 May 2015.
  13. ^ Highway now I-376 from Monroeville to Mercer

External links[edit]