Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust

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Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust
Conservation charity
HeadquartersThe Lodge
Armstrong Road
Littlemore
Oxford
Area served
Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)
Key people
  • Steve Backshall (President)
  • Sir Clive Booth (Chairman of Board of Trustees)
  • Estelle Bailey (Chief Executive)[1]
Decrease £3.83 million GBP (2012)[2]
Decrease -£198,356 GBP (2012)[2]
Total assetsDecrease £11.82 million GBP (2012)[2]
Number of employees
Websitewww.bbowt.org.uk

The Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust (BBOWT, pronounced /ˈbbt/) is a wildlife trust covering the counties of Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire in England.

The Trust was formerly called the Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Naturalists' Trust (BBONT).

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX

Sites[edit]

Berkshire[edit]

Site Photograph Area[a] Location[a] Public access[a] Classifications Description
Audrey's Meadow[4] 2.0 hectares (4.9 acres) Greenham
51°23′26″N 1°18′08″W / 51.3905°N 1.3022°W / 51.3905; -1.3022 (Audrey's Meadow)
SU 486 659
YES
Avery's Pightle[5] Avery's Pightle 1.5 hectares (3.7 acres) Enborne
51°23′01″N 1°22′32″W / 51.3837°N 1.3756°W / 51.3837; -1.3756 (Avery's Pightle)
SU 435 651
YES SSSI[6] This unimproved meadow is species rich and it has surviving ridge and furrow, suggesting a long history of traditional management without modern herbicides or fertilisers. Twenty-four species of grass and a hundred and thirteen herbs have been recorded. There is a wet ditch which has water whorl grass.[7]
Bowdown Woods[8] 54.5 hectares (135 acres) Crookham
51°23′09″N 1°16′20″W / 51.3858°N 1.2721°W / 51.3858; -1.2721 (Bowdown Woods)
SU 507 654
YES SSSI[9]
Bucklebury Common[10] Bucklebury Common 345.0 hectares (853 acres) Bucklebury
51°25′08″N 1°12′13″W / 51.4189°N 1.2036°W / 51.4189; -1.2036 (Bucklebury Common)
SU 554 691
FP This privately owned estate is mainly broadleaved woodland, including a four hundred year old avenue of oak trees, but there are also large areas of heath. Fauna include dark bush-crickets, slow-worms, meadow grasshoppers, adders, nightjars and woodlarks.[10]
Chawridge Bank[11] Chawridge Bank 4.5 hectares (11 acres) Winkfield
51°27′17″N 0°43′11″W / 51.4547°N 0.71974°W / 51.4547; -0.71974 (Chawridge Bank)
SU 890 736
YES SSSI[12] This linear site is named after the stream called Chawridge Bourne, which runs through it. Half of it is unimproved grassland, which is managed by sheep grazing. There are also areas of scrub and broadleaved woodland. On the east side there is an ancient parish boundary hedge which has diverse tree flora.[13]
Decoy Heath[14] Decoy Heath 8.0 hectares (20 acres) Mortimer West End
51°22′00″N 1°07′12″W / 51.3668°N 1.1201°W / 51.3668; -1.1201 (Decoy Heath)
SU 613 634
YES SSSI[15] This heathland site also has areas of bog. It is one of the best sites in the county for dragonflies and damselflies; the twenty-three species which breed in its shallow pools include keeled skimmer and four-spotted chaser dragonflies and white-legged, emerald and small red damselflies.[14]
Greenham and Crookham Commons[16] Greenham Common 444.0 hectares (1,097 acres) Greenham
51°23′02″N 1°16′16″W / 51.384°N 1.271°W / 51.384; -1.271 (Greenham and Crookham Commons)
SU 507 652
YES SSSI[17] In the 1980s Greenham Common was a military base storing nuclear weapons and the location of the Women's Peace Camp, but following the closure of the base it was opened to the public as a nature reserve in 2000.[16] The two commons have the largest area of heathland and acid grassland in the county and other habitats are gorse scrub, broad leaved woodland and water-logged alder valleys. There is a rich variety of invertebrates, such as the white admiral, purple emperor and silver-washed fritillary woodland butterflies.[18]
Haymill Valley[19] Haymill Valley 8.0 hectares (20 acres) Burnham
51°31′46″N 0°38′34″W / 51.5295°N 0.6427°W / 51.5295; -0.6427 (Haymill Valley)
SU 942 820
YES LNR[20] This nature reserve has woodland with bluebells and great spotted woodpecker, together with reedbeds which have flora including yellow iris and marsh-marigold. There are butterflies such as orange-tips, holly blues and speckled woods.[19]
Hosehill Lake[21] Hosehill Lake - March 2017 23.5 hectares (58 acres) Theale
51°25′26″N 1°04′02″W / 51.4239°N 1.0673°W / 51.4239; -1.0673 (Hosehill Lake)
SU 649 698
YES LNR[22] The lake has a wide variety of water birds, including lapwings, little ringed plovers and great crested grebes. There is also a wildflower meadow which is grazed by wild Exmoor ponies and it has many butterflies and moths.[21]
Hurley Chalk Pit[23] 1.0 hectare (2.5 acres) Henley-on-Thames
51°31′55″N 0°49′45″W / 51.5320°N 0.8293°W / 51.5320; -0.8293 (Hurley Chalk Pit)
SU 813 821
YES
Inkpen Common[24] Inkpen Common 12.0 hectares (30 acres) Inkpen
51°22′37″N 1°27′06″W / 51.3769°N 1.4518°W / 51.3769; -1.4518 (Inkpen Common)
SU 382 643
YES SSSI[25] This is a surviving fragment of the former Inkpen Great Common. It is mainly damp heathland, with small areas of marsh, woods and bracken. Flora on the heath include purple moor grass, common gorse, lousewort, lesser dodder and the only surviving colony in Berkshire of pale heath violet.[26]
Inkpen Crocus Field[27] Inkpen Crocus Field 3.0 hectares (7.4 acres) Inkpen
51°22′31″N 1°28′09″W / 51.3752°N 1.4691°W / 51.3752; -1.4691 (Inkpen Crocus Field)
SU 370 641
YES SSSI[28] In 1912, Charles Rothschild founded 'The Society for the Promotion of Nature Reserves', the forerunner of The Wildlife Trusts, and Inkpen Crocus Field is one of the 284 'Rochschild Reserves', a list drawn up by the Society in its first three years of sites "worthy of preservation".[29] The spring crocus is a rare Red Data Book plant which is not native to Britain but has been recorded on this site since 1800.[30] More than 400,000 flowers bloom in the spring.[27]
Kintbury Newt Ponds[31] 2.5 hectares (6.2 acres) Kintbury
51°23′42″N 1°26′45″W / 51.3949°N 1.4459°W / 51.3949; -1.4459 (Kintbury Newt Ponds)
SU 386 663
YES
Loddon Nature Reserve[32] Loddon Nature Reserve 13.5 hectares (33 acres) Twyford
51°28′31″N 0°52′13″W / 51.4753°N 0.8704°W / 51.4753; -0.8704 (Loddon Nature Reserve)
SU 785 757
YES This site has a large gravel pit with several islands and surrounded by scrub, which provides a habitat for nesting wetland birds such as great crested grebes, moorhens and coots. There are wintering birds such as gadwalls, smews, tufted ducks, pochards, cormorants and snipes.[32]
Moor Copse[33] Moor Copse 64.5 hectares (159 acres) Tidmarsh
51°27′36″N 1°05′17″W / 51.4600°N 1.0881°W / 51.4600; -1.0881 (Moor Copse)
SU 634 738
YES SSSI[34] This reserve in the valley of the River Pang has wildflower meadows surrounded by wet woodland. In the autumn the woods have a range of fungi, such as deadman's fingers and green elfcup mushrooms. Mammals include foxes and badgers.[33]
Nature Discovery Centre[35] Nature Discovery Centre 35 hectares (86 acres) Thatcham
51°24′00″N 1°16′26″W / 51.39998°N 1.2738°W / 51.39998; -1.2738 (Nature Discovery Centre)
SU 506 670
PL This site has a variety of habitats including a lake, woodland, reedbeds and hedges. The lake has many wintering wildfowl such as shovelers and pochrds. Invertebrates include the bloody-nosed and rhinoceros beetles.[35]
Padworth Common[36] Padworth Common 28.0 hectares (69 acres) Mortimer West End
51°22′45″N 1°06′41″W / 51.3793°N 1.1113°W / 51.3793; -1.1113 (Padworth Common)
SU 619 648
YES LNR[37] This site is mainly heath, but there are also areas of grassland, wet gullies, ponds and oak and pine woodland. There is a variety of heathland birds such as Dartford warbler, tree pipit, stonechat, woodlark and the rare nightjar. The pond has many dragonflies and damselflies.[36]
Paices Wood Country Parkland[38] 35.0 hectares (86 acres) Aldermaston
51°22′10″N 1°09′09″W / 51.3695°N 1.1524°W / 51.3695; -1.1524 (Paices Wood Country Parkland)
SU 591 637
PL
Rack Marsh[39] Rack Marsh 4.0 hectares (9.9 acres) Hungerford
51°25′20″N 1°21′02″W / 51.4223°N 1.3506°W / 51.4223; -1.3506 (Rack Marsh)
SU 452 694
YES NCR,[40] SAC,[41] SSSI[40]
Seven Barrows[42] Seven Barrows 3.5 hectares (8.6 acres) Lambourn
51°32′37″N 1°31′29″W / 51.5436°N 1.5248°W / 51.5436; -1.5248 (Seven Barrows)
SU 330 828
YES SM,[43] SSSI[44] The site is part of a Bronze Age cemetery with scattered bowl barrows.[43] The area is an unimproved chalk grassland with a rich flora and over 100 species of herbs have been recorded. It is also very rich in insects, especially butterflies, including small blue, brown argus, chalkhill blue, dark green fritillary and the scarce marsh fritillary.[45]
Shepperlands Farm[46] 9.5 hectares (23 acres) Finchampstead
51°22′19″N 0°52′59″W / 51.3720°N 0.8830°W / 51.3720; -0.8830 (Shepperlands Farm)
SU 778 642
YES
Snelsmore Common Country Park[47] Snelsmore Common Country Park 96.0 hectares (237 acres) Newbury
51°26′12″N 1°20′05″W / 51.4366°N 1.3346°W / 51.4366; -1.3346 (Snelsmore Common Country Park)
SU 463 710
YES SSSI[48] This is a country park which has diverse habitats, including dry heath, wet heath, bog, birch woods and ancient semi-natural broadleaved woodland. The bog has a 5,000 year old layer of peat which has been studied stratigraphically to show changes in ancient land use and vegetation. An area of wet alder woodland has many lichens, including a rich community which grows on trees, such as Parmelia caperarta, Pertusaria pertusa and Lecanactis abietina.[49]
Sole Common Pond[50] 3.0 hectares (7.4 acres) Newbury
51°26′00″N 1°24′34″W / 51.4334°N 1.4094°W / 51.4334; -1.4094 (Sole Common Pond)
SU 411 706
YES
Thatcham Reed Beds[51] Thatcham Reedbeds 35.0 hectares (86 acres) Thatcham
51°24′03″N 1°16′25″W / 51.4009°N 1.2736°W / 51.4009; -1.2736 (Thatcham Reedbeds)
SU 506 671
YES LNR,[52] SAC,[53] SSSI[54] The site is nationally important for its reed beds, fen and species rich alder woods. It is also nationally important for Desmoulin's whorl snails and there are many breeding birds, such as the nationally rare Cetti's warbler. Wetland plants include common valerian, skullcap and marsh bedstraw.[55]
Watts Bank[56] 1.5 hectares (3.7 acres) Lambourn
51°29′33″N 1°31′30″W / 51.4925°N 1.5249°W / 51.4925; -1.5249 (Watts Bank)
SU 331 772
YES
Wildmoor Heath[57] Wildmoor Heath 104.0 hectares (257 acres) Sandhurst
51°21′30″N 0°47′26″W / 51.3582°N 0.7905°W / 51.3582; -0.7905 (Wildmoor Heath)
SU 843 628
YES SSSI[58][59] This sloping site has wet and dry heath and woodland. There are also areas of bog which are grazed by Dexter cattle to keep down the growth of coarse purple moor-grass; twenty species of damselfly and dragonfly have been recorded in the bogs and plants include bog asphodel, butterwort, round-leaved sundew and white beaked-sedge.[57]
Wokefield Common[60] Wokefield Common 60.0 hectares (148 acres) Burghfield
51°23′29″N 1°03′44″W / 51.3915°N 1.0622°W / 51.3915; -1.0622 (Wokefield Common)
SU 653662
YES The common is heath and woodland with two ponds, Dragonfly Pond and Pullen's Pond, which provide a habitat for a variety of dragonflies and damselflies. Other invertebrates include common blue, brimstone and comma butterflies. The main heathland plants are bell heather, common gorse and broom.[60]

Buckinghamshire[edit]

Site Photograph Area[a] Location[a] Public access[a] Classifications Description
Aston Clinton Ragpits[61] Aston Clinton Ragpits 2.5 hectares (6.2 acres) Aston Clinton
51°47′18″N 0°42′48″W / 51.7884°N 0.7132°W / 51.7884; -0.7132 (Aston Clinton Ragpits)
SP 888 107
YES SSSI,[62] CAONB[63] This grassland site has steeply sloping old pits and spoil heaps, with a rich assembly of shrubs, herbs and invertebrates, including twenty-seven butterfly species. There is some mature woodland with beech, yew, ash and whitebeam, together with a hedge and areas of scrub.[62] There are eight orchid species.[61]
Bacombe Hill[64] Bacombe Hill 25.0 hectares (62 acres) Upper Bacombe
51°45′12″N 0°46′02″W / 51.7534°N 0.7671°W / 51.7534; -0.7671 (Bacombe Hill)
SP 864 074
YES SSSI,[65] LNR,[66] CAONB[67] The site is chalk grassland, scrub and woodland. It has pyramidal and bee orchids, wild thyme and chalkhill blue butterflies. The woodland on the slopes is mainly whitebeam and ash, with oak and birch on the plateau. Juniper shrubs provide a habitat for rare insects such as the juniper shield bug.[64]
Bernwood Meadows[68] Bernwood Meadows 7.5 hectares (19 acres) Oakley
51°47′45″N 1°07′19″W / 51.7957°N 1.1220°W / 51.7957; -1.1220 (Bernwood Meadows)
SP 606 111
YES This traditional hay meadow has over 100 plant species, including lady's bedstraw, green winged orchids and cuckooflowers. It also has many species of butterfly, such as orange tip and rare black and brown hairstreaks. other wildlife includes brown hares, kestrels and moths.[68]
Calvert Jubilee[69] Calvert Jubilee 22.0 hectares (54 acres) Calvert
51°55′18″N 1°00′32″W / 51.9216°N 1.0090°W / 51.9216; -1.0090 (Calvert Jubilee)
SP 682 252
YES Most of the site is a deep lake, created by the extraction of clay for the brick industry. It is now used in winter by wildfowl such as mallard, tufted duck and pochard. There are two bird hides, and the trust has created three floating islands to enable waterfowl to breed safe from foxes. The lakeside has a variety of wild flowers and butterflies.[69]
College Lake[70] College Lake 65.0 hectares (161 acres) Pitstone
51°49′12″N 0°39′00″W / 51.8201°N 0.6501°W / 51.8201; -0.6501 (College Lake)
SP 931 144
YES SSSI[71][72] The site has more than a thousand species of wildlife on the lake, marshland and grassland. Rare species include redshanks and Lapwings. The marshes are an important habitat for breeding waders, and chalk grassland has a range of insects and small mammals.[70] One small area is a geological Site of Special Scientific Interest.[71][72]
Dancersend with Pavis Woods[73] Dancersend 85.0 hectares (210 acres) Aston Clinton
51°46′35″N 0°41′46″W / 51.7765°N 0.6962°W / 51.7765; -0.6962 (Dancersend with Pavis Woods)
SP 905 089
YES SSSI,[74] CAONB[74] There are woodland plantations, unimproved chalk grassland and scrub. The woods have few mature trees as most were felled during the 1940s, but a rich ground flora includes plants associated with ancient woodland, such as hairy brome and wood melick. The site is important for its butterflies and moths, and it has a diverse population of breeding birds.[74]
Finemere Wood[75] Finemere Wood 76.5 hectares (189 acres) Quainton
51°53′16″N 0°57′11″W / 51.8878°N 0.9531°W / 51.8878; -0.9531 (Finemere Wood)
SP 721 215
YES SSSI[76] Most of the site is ancient pedunculate oak forest, which has butterflies including the rare wood white and black hairstreak. There is also an area of rough grassland and scrub which is crossed by the River Ray.[77][75]
Gomm Valley[78] Gomm Valley 4.0 hectares (9.9 acres) High Wycombe
51°37′17″N 0°42′21″W / 51.6215°N 0.7057°W / 51.6215; -0.7057 (Gomm Valley)
SU 898 921
YES SSSI,[79] CAONB,[80] The site is chalk grassland which is reverting to scrub. It has a rich variety of herbs and of invertebrates, and is notable for reptiles and over-wintering birds, particularly thrushes. Over 30 species of butterflies and 180 of moths have been recorded.[79][78]
Grangelands and The Rifle Range[81] Grangelands 18.0 hectares (44 acres) Cadsden
51°44′15″N 0°48′03″W / 51.7376°N 0.8009°W / 51.7376; -0.8009 (Grangelands and The Rifle Range)
SP 828 050
YES SSSI,[82] CAONB[82] The site has grassland and scrub, which support interesting breeding birds and invertebrates, such as glow-worms and marbled white and chalk hill blue butterflies. There are areas of mature beech woodland, with a sparse shrub layer of holly and elder.[82]
Hog and Hollowhill Woods[83] Hollowhill Wood 7.8 hectares (19 acres) Marlow
51°52′54″N 0°59′07″W / 51.8818°N 0.9852°W / 51.8818; -0.9852 (Hog and Hollowhill Woods)
SU 823 861
YES SSSI,[83] SAC,[83] CAONB[83] A large part of the site is mature beech woodland, the result of neglected coppicing. Much of the ground is bare, but there are some unusual plants, including the nationally rare ghost orchid. Trees on the lower slopes include ash, wild cherry and crab apple, and there is heather in more open areas.[84]
Homefield Wood[85] Homefield Wood 6.0 hectares (15 acres) Hambleden
51°34′26″N 0°49′39″W / 51.5738°N 0.8275°W / 51.5738; -0.8275 (Homefield Wood)
SU 814 867
YES SSSI,[86] CAONB,[86] FC[86] The site has young beech plantations, with some conifers and many native trees. There are rides and glades in some areas which have important and varied herb-rich chalk grassland, with plants such as Chiltern gentian and upright brome-grass and a variety of orchids. The rich invertebrate fauna includes thirty species of butterfly and over four hundred of moth.[86][85]
Little Linford Wood[87] Little Linford Wood 42.5 hectares (105 acres) Little Linford
52°06′07″N 0°46′59″W / 52.1020°N 0.7831°W / 52.1020; -0.7831 (Little Linford Wood)
SP 834 455
YES Much of the woodland is young as it was felled in 1980, shortly before the Trust took over the site, but there are also areas of mature oak and ash. In 1998 dormice were introduced, and they live high up in the canopy. Other mammals include stoats and badgers, and there are birds such as great spotted woodpeckers, kestrels and buzzards. Grassy rides provide a habitat for butterflies.[87]
Long Grove Wood[88] Long Grove Wood 1.5 hectares (3.7 acres) Seer Green
51°36′55″N 0°36′35″W / 51.6154°N 0.6098°W / 51.6154; -0.6098 (Long Grove Wood)
SU 963 916
YES The site is deciduous woodland with the main trees being beach and hornbeam. The Great Storm of 1987 brought down several trees, creating open areas which were colonised by flowers such as bluebell and yellow archangel. Dead wood is kept to provide a habitat for insects and fungi. Birds include great spotted woodpeckers and tree creepers.[88]
Millfield Wood[89] Millfield Wood 7.5 hectares (19 acres) High Wycombe
51°39′04″N 0°44′36″W / 51.6511°N 0.7432°W / 51.6511; -0.7432 (Millfield Wood)
SU 870 956
YES SSSI[90] The site was owned in the late nineteenth century by Benjamin Disraeli, and the woodland is much older. It is semi-natural beech woodland on chalk, which is an unusual habitat, and it also has considerable wych elm. Its rich ground flora includes many wild flowers. There are a number of badger setts and a varied invertebrate fauna. Birds include great spotted woodpeckers and chiffchaffs.[90][89]
Pilch Field[91] Pilch Field 12.0 hectares (30 acres) Great Horwood
51°59′01″N 0°54′47″W / 51.9837°N 0.9130°W / 51.9837; -0.9130 (Pilch Field)
SP 749 321
YES SSSI[92] The site has two fields called Big Pilch and Little Pilch. The varied habitats in Big Pilch include wetland, fen, scrub, a stream and ridge-and-furrow grassland. The stream continues into Little Pilch, which has spring-fed fen and grassland. Over two hundred flowering plants have been recorded.[93] There are birds such as turtle doves, yellowhammers and reed buntings.[91]
Rushbeds Wood[94] Rushbeds Wood 56.0 hectares (138 acres) Wotton Underwood
51°50′01″N 1°01′26″W / 51.8336°N 1.0240°W / 51.8336; -1.0240 (Rushbeds Wood)
SP 673 154
YES SSSI[95] The site is ancient woodland on heavy clay soils which are often waterlogged. The invertebrate fauna are described by Natural England as "exceptional", including over thirty butterfly species, such as the nationally rare black hairstreak and the scarce wood white and purple emperor. The woodland is wet ash and maple, and the understorey has species indicative of long tree cover, such as Poa nemoralis. In the ponds and ditches there are breeding smooth and great crested newts.[95]
Upper Ray Meadows[96] View from bird hide at Gallows Bridge Farm 181.0 hectares (447 acres) Marsh Gibbon
51°52′30″N 1°01′44″W / 51.8750°N 1.0289°W / 51.8750; -1.0289 (Upper Ray Meadows)
SP 669 200
PP SSSI[97] The site consists of meadows on the floodplain of the River Ray, and it is a stronghold for rare species because heavy clay soils and frequent flooding makes arable farming difficult. Medieval ridge and furrow can still be seen in some fields. In the summer, drier areas have displays of wild flowers such as black knapweed, meadowsweet and tufted vetch.[96]
Weston Turville Reservoir[98] Weston Turville Reservoir 18.5 hectares (46 acres) Weston Turville
51°46′44″N 0°45′04″W / 51.7789°N 0.7512°W / 51.7789; -0.7512 (Weston Turville Reservoir)
SP 862 096
YES SSSI,[99] CAONB[100] The reservoir was built in 1797 to supply water to the Wendover Arm of the Grand Union Canal.[98][100] Large areas have a deep silt deposit, but the open water is an important site for 46 species of over-wintering waterfowl, and it is nationally important for shovelers. The areas around the reservoir has tall fen, reed beds and willow carr, which are declining habitats in Britain. There are over 300 species of beetle, of which six are rare nationally.[99]
Yoesden[101] Yoesden 13.8 hectares (34 acres) Bledlow Ridge
51°40′29″N 0°51′35″W / 51.6748°N 0.8596°W / 51.6748; -0.8596 (Yoesden)
SU 789 979
YES The site has areas of woodland and grassland. The steeply sloping chalk meadow has many species of butterfly, including three scarce blue species, the Adonis, chalkhill and small blue. There are flowers such as common spotted and fragrant orchids. Beech woodland above the chalk bank supports great spotted woodpeckers and red kites, and lower woodland has beech and yews.[101]

Oxfordshire[edit]

Site Photograph Area[a] Location[a] Public access[a] Classifications Description
Ardley Wood Quarry[102] 11.0 hectares (27 acres) Ardley
51°56′28″N 1°13′08″W / 51.9412°N 1.2190°W / 51.9412; -1.2190 (Ardley Wood Quarry)
SP 537 272
YES
Asham Meads[103] 23.0 hectares (57 acres) Murcott
51°49′27″N 1°08′43″W / 51.8242°N 1.1453°W / 51.8242; -1.1453 (Asham Meads)
SP 590 143
YES
Blenheim Farm[104] Blenheim Farm 0.5 hectares (1.2 acres) Charlbury
51°52′19″N 1°28′22″W / 51.8720°N 1.4727°W / 51.8720; -1.4727 (Blenheim Farm)
SP 364 194
YES
Chimney Meadows[105] Chimney Meadows 261.0 hectares (645 acres) Chimney
51°42′33″N 1°29′21″W / 51.7093°N 1.4891°W / 51.7093; -1.4891 (Chimney Meadows)
SP 354 013
YES
Chinnor Hill[106] Chinnor Hill 27.5 hectares (68 acres) Chinnor
51°41′43″N 0°53′30″W / 51.6953°N 0.89168°W / 51.6953; -0.89168 (Chinnor Hill)
SP 767 002
YES SSSI
Cholsey Marsh[107] Cholsey Marsh 19.0 hectares (47 acres) Cholsey
51°33′55″N 1°08′03″W / 51.5652°N 1.1343°W / 51.5652; -1.1343 (Cholsey Marsh)
SU 601 855
YES
CS Lewis Nature Reserve[108] 2.5 hectares (6.2 acres) Oxford
51°45′22″N 1°11′24″W / 51.7562°N 1.1901°W / 51.7562; -1.1901 (CS Lewis Nature Reserve)
SP 560 067
YES
Dry Sandford Pit[109] Damselfly in Dry Sandford Pit 8.0 hectares (20 acres) Dry Sandford
51°41′39″N 1°19′33″W / 51.6941°N 1.3258°W / 51.6941; -1.3258 (Dry Sandford Pit)
SU 467 997
YES
Foxholes[110] 23.0 hectares (57 acres) Charlbury
51°53′03″N 1°37′51″W / 51.8843°N 1.6309°W / 51.8843; -1.6309 (Foxholes)
SP 263 204
YES SSSI[111]
Glyme Valley[112] 2.5 hectares (6.2 acres) Chipping Norton
51°55′53″N 1°30′56″W / 51.9315°N 1.5156°W / 51.9315; -1.5156 (Glyme Valley)
SP 334 260
YES
Hartslock[113] Hartslock 9.5 hectares (23 acres) Pangbourne
51°30′43″N 1°06′49″W / 51.5120°N 1.1137°W / 51.5120; -1.1137 (Hartslock)
SU 616 796
YES SSSI, SAC
Hitchcopse Pit[114] 3.0 hectares (7.4 acres) Dry Sandford
51°41′33″N 1°20′51″W / 51.6924°N 1.34748°W / 51.6924; -1.34748 (Hitchcopse Pit)
SU 452 995
YES
Hook Norton Cutting[115] Hook Norton Cutting 8.0 hectares (20 acres) Hook Norton
51°59′17″N 1°28′38″W / 51.9880°N 1.4772°W / 51.9880; -1.4772 (Hook Norton Cutting)
SP 360 323
YES SSSI
Iffley Meadows[116] Cattle on Iffley Meadows 33.0 hectares (82 acres) Oxford
51°43′53″N 1°14′28″W / 51.7314°N 1.2412°W / 51.7314; -1.2412 (Iffley Meadows)
SP 525 039
YES
Lamb's Pool[117] 2.5 hectares (6.2 acres) Hook Norton
52°01′20″N 1°29′18″W / 52.0222°N 1.4884°W / 52.0222; -1.4884 (Lamb's Pool)
SP 352 361
YES
Lashford Lane Fen[118] 6.5 hectares (16 acres) Dry Sandford
51°42′24″N 1°19′27″W / 51.7067°N 1.3241°W / 51.7067; -1.3241 (Lashford Lane Fen)
SP 468 011
YES
Letcombe Valley[119] Letcombe Valley 7.5 hectares (19 acres) Letcombe Regis
51°34′18″N 1°27′24″W / 51.5717°N 1.4568°W / 51.5717; -1.4568 (Letcombe Valley)
SU 377 860
YES Letcombe Brook, which runs through the reserve, is one of only two chalk streams in Oxfordshire and 161 nationwide. Wildlife includes water voles and fish such as bullhead, brown trout and the primitive brook lamprey. There are also Daubenton's bats, while insects include rare flies. Additional habitats are ancient woodland and a small area of chalk grassland.[119]
Oakley Hill[120] Oakley Hill 13.0 hectares (32 acres) Chinnor
51°41′18″N 0°54′44″W / 51.6883°N 0.9121°W / 51.6883; -0.9121 (Oakley Hill)
SU 753 994
YES
Oxey Mead[121] 8.0 hectares (20 acres) Oxford
51°47′34″N 1°18′30″W / 51.7929°N 1.3083°W / 51.7929; -1.3083 (Oxey Mead)
SP 478 107
YES
Parsonage Moor[122] Parsonage Moor 5.5 hectares (14 acres) Dry Sandford
51°41′39″N 1°20′04″W / 51.6942°N 1.3344°W / 51.6942; -1.3344 (Parsonage Moor)
SU 461 997
YES
Sydlings Copse[123] 22.0 hectares (54 acres) Headington
51°46′56″N 1°11′28″W / 51.78228°N 1.1911°W / 51.78228; -1.1911 (Sydlings Copse)
SP 559 096
YES
Tuckmill Meadow[124] 5.5 hectares (14 acres) Watchfield
51°36′30″N 1°39′17″W / 51.6083°N 1.6548°W / 51.6083; -1.6548 (Tuckmill Meadow)
SU 240 900
YES
Warburg Nature Reserve[125] Warburg Nature Reserve 106.5 hectares (263 acres) Henley-on-Thames
51°35′04″N 0°57′39″W / 51.5845°N 0.96077°W / 51.5845; -0.96077 (Warburg Nature Reserve)
SU 721 878
YES
Warren Bank[126] 3.0 hectares (7.4 acres) Henley-on-Thames
51°34′00″N 1°03′32″W / 51.5666°N 1.05886°W / 51.5666; -1.05886 (Warren Bank)
SU 653 857
YES
Wells Farm[127] 66.0 hectares (163 acres) Little Milton
51°42′19″N 1°05′52″W / 51.7053°N 1.09766°W / 51.7053; -1.09766 (Wells Farm)
SP 624 011
YES
Westwell Gorse[128] 2.5 hectares (6.2 acres) Burford
51°48′02″N 1°41′00″W / 51.8005°N 1.6832°W / 51.8005; -1.6832 (Westwell Gorse)
SP 219 113
YES
Whitecross Green Wood[129] Whitecross Green Wood 64.0 hectares (158 acres) Boarstall
51°49′31″N 1°07′33″W / 51.8254°N 1.1257°W / 51.8254; -1.1257 (Whitecross Green Wood)
SP 603 144
YES SSSI

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i The area, location and public access are taken from the Berkshire, Buckhamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust page for each site.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Who We Are—People". BBOWT. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d "Report and Financial Statements (2012)" (PDF). BBOWT. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  3. ^ "Who We Are". BBOWT. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  4. ^ "Audrey's Meadow". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  5. ^ "Avery's Pightle". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  6. ^ "Designated Sites View: Avery's Pightle". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  7. ^ "Avery's Pightle citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 10 October 2019.
  8. ^ "Bowdown Woods". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  9. ^ "Designated Sites View: Bowdown and Chamberhouse Woods". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  10. ^ a b "Bucklebury Common". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  11. ^ "Chawridge Bank". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  12. ^ "Designated Sites View: Chawridge Bourne". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  13. ^ "Chawridge Bourne citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 October 2019.
  14. ^ a b "Decoy Heath". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  15. ^ "Designated Sites View: Decoy Pit, Pools & Woods". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 5 November 2019.
  16. ^ a b "Greenham and Crookham Commons". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  17. ^ "Designated Sites View: Greenham and Crookham Commons". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  18. ^ "Greenham and Crookham Commons citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 15 October 2019.
  19. ^ a b "Haymill Valley". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  20. ^ "Designated Sites View: Haymill Valley". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 8 October 2019.
  21. ^ a b "Hosehill Lake". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  22. ^ "Designated Sites View: Hosehill Lake". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 8 October 2019.
  23. ^ "Hurley Chalk Pit". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  24. ^ "Inkpen Common". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  25. ^ "Designated Sites View: Inkpen Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 October 2019.
  26. ^ "Inkpen Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 October 2019.
  27. ^ a b "Inkpen Crocus Field". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  28. ^ "Designated Sites View: Inkpen Crocus Fields". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 8 October 2019.
  29. ^ "The Rothschild Reserves". The Wildlife Trusts. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 7 December 2014.
  30. ^ "Inkpen Crocus Field citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 20 October 2019.
  31. ^ "Kintbury Newt Ponds". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  32. ^ a b "Loddon Nature Reserve". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  33. ^ a b "Moor Copse". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  34. ^ "Designated Sites View: Sulham and Tidmarsh Woods and Meadows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 8 November 2019.
  35. ^ a b "Nature Discovery Centre". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  36. ^ a b "Padworth Common". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  37. ^ "Designated Sites View: Padworth Common". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 2 November 2019.
  38. ^ "Paices Wood Country Parkland". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  39. ^ "Rack Marsh". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  40. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Kennet and Lambourn Floodplain". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  41. ^ "Designated Sites View: Kennet & Lambourn Floodplain". Special Areas of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  42. ^ "Seven Barrows". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  43. ^ a b "Round barrow cemetery at Seven Barrows, Lambourn". Historic England. Retrieved 23 October 2019.
  44. ^ "Designated Sites View: Seven Barrows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 24 October 2019.
  45. ^ "Seven Barrows citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 23 October 2019.
  46. ^ "Shepperlands Farm". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  47. ^ "Snelsmore Common Country Park". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  48. ^ "Designated Sites View: Snelsmore Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 8 October 2019.
  49. ^ "Snelsmore Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 24 October 2019.
  50. ^ "Sole Common Pond". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  51. ^ "Thatcham Reedbeds". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  52. ^ "Designated Sites View: Thatcham Reedbeds". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 8 October 2019.
  53. ^ "Designated Sites View: Kennet & Lambourn Floodplain". Special Areas of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  54. ^ "Designated Sites View: Thatcham Reed Beds". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 8 October 2019.
  55. ^ "Thatcham Reed Beds citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 24 October 2019.
  56. ^ "Watts Bank". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  57. ^ a b "Wildmoor Heath". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  58. ^ "Designated Sites View: Sandhurst to Owlsmoor Bogs and Heaths". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  59. ^ "Designated Sites View: Broadmoor to Bagshot Woods and Heaths". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 30 November 2018. Retrieved 30 September 2018.
  60. ^ a b "Wokefield Common". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  61. ^ a b "Aston Clinton Ragpits". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 9 October 2015.
  62. ^ a b "Aston Clinton Ragpits citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 April 2016. Retrieved 9 October 2015.
  63. ^ "Aston Clinton Ragpits". Chilterns Conservation Board. Retrieved 9 October 2015.
  64. ^ a b "Bacombe Hill". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  65. ^ "Bacombe and Coombe Hills citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 December 2014. Retrieved 4 January 2015.
  66. ^ "Bacombe Hill". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 8 August 2013. Archived from the original on 4 January 2015. Retrieved 4 January 2015.
  67. ^ "Bacombe Hill Local Nature Reserve". Chilterns Conservation Board. Retrieved 4 January 2015.
  68. ^ a b "Bernwood Meadows". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  69. ^ a b "Calvert Jubilee". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  70. ^ a b "College Lake". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  71. ^ a b "Pitstone Quarry citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 9 October 2015.
  72. ^ a b "Map of Pitstone Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 9 October 2015.
  73. ^ "Dancersend with Pavis Woods". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  74. ^ a b c "Dancersend with Pavis Woods citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 January 2016. Retrieved 10 October 2015.
  75. ^ a b "Finemere Wood". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 13 February 2016. Retrieved 17 February 2016.
  76. ^ "Finemere Wood SSSI". Designated Sites View. Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 9 October 2019.
  77. ^ "COUNTY: BUCKINGHAMSHIRE / SITE NAME: FINEMERE WOOD" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 7 January 2015.
  78. ^ a b "Gomm Valley". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 12 May 2015. Retrieved 9 January 2015.
  79. ^ a b "Gomm Valley citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 9 January 2015.
  80. ^ "Gomm Valley". Chilterns Conservation Board. Retrieved 9 January 2015.
  81. ^ "Grangelands and The Rifle Range". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  82. ^ a b c "Grangelands and Pulpit Hill citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 December 2014. Retrieved 10 January 2015.
  83. ^ a b c d "Hog and Hollowhill Woods". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  84. ^ "Pullingshill and Hollowhill Woods citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 28 September 2015.
  85. ^ a b "Homefield Wood". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 30 September 2015. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  86. ^ a b c d "Homefield Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 October 2015. Retrieved 29 September 2015.
  87. ^ a b "Little Linford Wood". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  88. ^ a b "Long Grove Wood". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  89. ^ a b "Millfield Wood". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 14 September 2015. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  90. ^ a b "Millfield Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 January 2016. Retrieved 11 October 2015.
  91. ^ a b "Pilch Field". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 24 October 2015. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  92. ^ "Pilch Fields citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 12 October 2015.
  93. ^ "Pilch Fields". Milton Keynes Natural History Society. Retrieved 12 October 2015.
  94. ^ "Rushbeds Wood". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  95. ^ a b "Rushbeds Wood and Railway Cutting citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 7 April 2016.
  96. ^ a b "Upper Ray Meadows". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  97. ^ "Long Herdon Meadow citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 20 March 2016.
  98. ^ a b "Weston Turville Reservoir". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  99. ^ a b "Weston Turville Reservoir citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 October 2015.
  100. ^ a b "Weston Turville Reservoir". Chilterns Conservation Board. Retrieved 13 October 2015.
  101. ^ a b "Yoesden". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  102. ^ "Ardley Wood Quarry". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  103. ^ "Asham Meads". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 6 May 2016.
  104. ^ "Blenheim Farm". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  105. ^ "Chimney Meadows". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  106. ^ "Chinnor Hill". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  107. ^ "Cholsey Marsh". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  108. ^ "CS Lewis Nature Reserve". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  109. ^ "Dry Sandford Pit". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  110. ^ "Foxholes". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  111. ^ "Designated Sites View: Bould Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 10 October 2019.
  112. ^ "Glyme Valley". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  113. ^ "Hartslock". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  114. ^ "Hitchcopse Pit". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  115. ^ "Hook Norton Cutting". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  116. ^ "Iffley Meadows". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  117. ^ "Lamb's Pool". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  118. ^ "Lashford Lane Fen". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  119. ^ a b "Letcombe Valley". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  120. ^ "Oakley Hill". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  121. ^ "Oxey Mead". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  122. ^ "Parsonage Moor". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  123. ^ "Sydlings Copse". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  124. ^ "Tuckmill Meadow". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  125. ^ "Warburg Nature Reserve". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  126. ^ "Warren Bank". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  127. ^ "Wells Farm". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  128. ^ "Westwell Gorse". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  129. ^ "Whitecross Green Wood". Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 15 February 2016.

External links[edit]