Boothby Pagnell

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Boothby Pagnell
Church of St Andrew, Boothby Pagnell, Lincolnshire, England - lych gate.jpg
Lychgate of St Andrew's Church
Boothby Pagnell is located in Lincolnshire
Boothby Pagnell
Boothby Pagnell
Location within Lincolnshire
OS grid referenceSK971308
• London90 mi (140 km) S
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townGrantham
Postcode districtNG33
PoliceLincolnshire
FireLincolnshire
AmbulanceEast Midlands
EU ParliamentEast Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Lincolnshire
52°52′00″N 0°33′29″W / 52.866770°N 0.558159°W / 52.866770; -0.558159Coordinates: 52°52′00″N 0°33′29″W / 52.866770°N 0.558159°W / 52.866770; -0.558159

Boothby Pagnell is a village and civil parish in the South Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. The population is now included in the civil parish of Bitchfield and Bassingthorpe.

History[edit]

The Norman manor house

The village lay in the historical wapentake of Winnibriggs and Threo.[1]

Boothby Pagnell has a Grade I listed[2] surviving fragment of a medieval manor house, in the Norman style, dating from around 1200 AD.[3][4]

The village was a small community, its population in 1086 being just 19. It has archeological remains at 'Cooks Close', a field west of the church, which is chiefly of medieval housing that seems to have fallen into disuse and dereliction by the 14th century, possibly as a result of the desertion of the workforce in the aftermath of the Black Death.[citation needed]

John de Bothby, Lord Chancellor of Ireland, was born here about 1320 and took his name from the village.

Isaac Newton[edit]

Although his uncle William Ayscough, the brother of Hannah Ayscough, was vicar of nearby Burton Coggles, during his time of discovery[further explanation needed] in 1666–67, Newton spent some time in the summer at the rectory of Boothby Pagnell, which had a considerable orchard. The vicar was the Trinity College Fellow Humphrey Babington, the brother of Katherine Babington. She was a friend of Hannah Ayscough and the wife of William Clark, the owner of the house at which Newton lodged in Grantham while at school.[citation needed]

In his memoirs, Newton noted that he worked on Fluxions (which became differential calculus) at Babington's rectory, and also calculated the area under a hyperbola (involving integral calculus).[citation needed]

Geography[edit]

The village is just north of Bitchfield and south of Old Somerby on the B1176 and approximately 5 miles (8 km) south-east from Grantham. According to the 2001 Census it had a population of 150. Boothby Pagnell forms the most western point of 'The Ropsley Triangle', which denotes the general area between Ropsley, Boothby Pagnell and Ingoldsby.

Ecclesiastical parish[edit]

The local authority, and the Ordnance Survey, spell the village "Boothby Pagnell".[5] The Diocese of Lincoln spells the PCC as "Boothby Pagnall".[6]

The ecclesiastical parish is part of The North Beltisloe Group of parishes in the Deanery of Beltisloe.[6] From 2006 to 2011 the incumbent was Revd Richard Ireson.[7]

Boothby Pagnell Grade I listed Anglican parish church is dedicated to St Andrew[8] Restored in 1896, it has a Norman tower, font and nave arcades.[9] It also has a canonical sundial on the south wall.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Winnibriggs and Threo Wap"[permanent dead link], A Vision of Britain through Time. Retrieved 16 March 2012
  2. ^ Historic England. "Boothby Manor House (1360056)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 June 2011.
  3. ^ Service, Alastair (1982). Anglo-Saxon and Norman : A guide and Gazetteer. The Buildings of Britain. ISBN 0-09-150130-X.
  4. ^ Historic England. "Boothby Hall (325707)". PastScape. Retrieved 20 March 2010.
  5. ^ "Boothby Pagnell Parish Council". Lincolnshire.gov.uk
  6. ^ a b "Boothby Pagnall P C C". Archived from the original on 16 July 2011.
  7. ^ "North Beltisloe Group Council Report for PCC AGMs."; Boothby.org.uk. PDF download required. Retrieved 14 May 2012
  8. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Andrew (1062868)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 June 2011.
  9. ^ Cox, J. Charles (1916) Lincolnshire p. 68; Methuen & Co. Ltd.

External links[edit]