Causeland railway station

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Causeland National Rail
Causeland Halt 2030470 e75e1008.jpg
Looking north in 1987
Location
PlaceCauseland
Local authorityCornwall
Coordinates50°24′21″N 4°27′59″W / 50.40580°N 4.46640°W / 50.40580; -4.46640Coordinates: 50°24′21″N 4°27′59″W / 50.40580°N 4.46640°W / 50.40580; -4.46640
Grid referenceSX248591
Operations
Station codeCAU
Managed byGreat Western Railway
Number of platforms1
DfT categoryF2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2014/15Decrease 2,094
2015/16Decrease 1,976
2016/17Decrease 1,736
2017/18Increase 1,834
2018/19Decrease 1,620
History
1879opened
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Causeland from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

Causeland railway station (Cornish: Tir an Buhes) is an intermediate station 5 miles (8.0 km) south of Liskeard on the scenic Looe Valley Line in Cornwall, United Kingdom, which serves the hamlet of Causeland.

History[edit]

The Liskeard and Looe Railway was opened on 27 December 1860 to carry goods traffic; passenger trains started on 11 September 1879. The railway in those days connected with the Liskeard and Caradon Railway at Moorswater, and Causeland was the only other station apart from Looe.

In December 1881 Causeland was closed and a new station opened a little further down the valley at Sandplace. Causeland was reopened in June 1888.

Causeland is one of the stations named in Bernard Moore's poem Travelling.

Services[edit]

All trains on the Liskeard to Looe "Looe Valley Line" stop at Causeland on request: passengers alighting here must tell the conductor that they wish to do so, and those waiting to join must signal clearly to the driver as the train approaches. There is no Sunday service in the winter.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
St Keyne Wishing Well Halt   Great Western Railway
Looe Valley Line
  Sandplace

Description[edit]

The single platform is on the right of trains arriving from Liskeard.

Community rail[edit]

The railway between Liskeard and Looe is designated as a community rail line and is supported by marketing provided by the Devon and Cornwall Rail Partnership. The line is promoted under the "Looe Valley Line" name.

"Ye Old Plough House Inn" at Duloe is included in the Looe Valley Line rail ale trail although it is a 30-minute walk away.

References[edit]

  • Beale, Gerry (2000). The Liskeard and Looe Branch. Didcot: Wild Swan Publications Ltd. ISBN 1-874103-47-X.
  • Bennett, Alan (1990). The Great Western Railway in East Cornwall. Cheltenham: Runpast Publishing. ISBN 1-870754-11-5.
  • Clinker, CR (1963). The Railways of Cornwall 1809 - 1963. Dawlish: David and Charles.
  • Cooke, RA (1977). Track Layout Diagrams of the GWR and BR WR, Section 11: East Cornwall. Harwell: RA Cooke.
  • MacDermot, E T (1931). History of the Great Western Railway, volume II 1863-1921. London: Great Western Railway.
  • Messenger, Michael (2001). Caradon & Looe : the canal, railways and mines. Truro: Twelveheads Press. ISBN 0-906294-46-0.
  • Tolson, JM; Roose, G; Whetmath, CFD (1974). Railways of Looe and Caradon. Bracknell: Forge Books.