Charles B. Patterson

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New Thought

Charles Brodie Patterson (1854–1917) was a Canadian expatriate New Thought publisher, author, and editor.[1] Patterson, a Canadian expatriate who lived in New York City, was labelled the movement's leader when he died in the early 20th century.[2]

Biography[edit]

Patterson was born in 1854 in Nova Scotia. After graduating from the Pictou Academy in Pictou, Nova Scotia, Patterson pursued mercantile activities. At 31, he moved to Hartford, Connecticut for treatment from a mental healer. He studied at the Mental Science Institute in the city and attended the Alliance of Divine Unity.

He died June 22, 1917, in New York City.[3]

Career[edit]

In 1888, Patterson established the Metaphysical Alliance of Hartford, and served as president until 1904. In 1893, he opened the Alliance Publishing Company in New York City. He published books by New Thought and metaphysical authors including Horatio Dresser, Ursula Gestefeld, and Augustus Le Plongeon. Patterson published 15 books on New Thought, including The Measure of a Man, The New Way to Educate Children, and The Rhythm of Life. Patterson was labelled the New Thought movement's leader when he died in the early 20th century.[4]

He edited Mind magazine and the Library of Health journal, as well as Arena, the most influential New Thought publication of its time.

Among his books, he published:

Library of Health (1900);

Dominion and power, or, The science of life and living (1901)

The Will to be Well (1902)

The Measure of a Man (1907)

A new heaven and a new earth,or, The way to life eternal (thought studies of the fourth dimension)(1909)

The rhythm of life (1915)

Recognition[edit]

In addition to serving as a past president of the International New Thought Alliance, Patterson was president of the International Metaphysical League from 1899 to 1903,[5] and the later, the New Thought Federation.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sheldon, H.C. (1916) Theosophy and New Thought. Abingdon Press. p 131.
  2. ^ Mount, N.J. and Mount, N. (2005) When Canadian literature moved to New York. University of Toronto Press, 2005 . p 91.
  3. ^ Mount, N.J. and Mount, N. (2005) When Canadian literature moved to New York. University of Toronto Press, 2005 . p 92.
  4. ^ Mount, N.J. and Mount, N. (2005) When Canadian literature moved to New York. University of Toronto Press, 2005 . p 91.
  5. ^ Braden, C.S. (1963) Spirits in rebellion: The rise and development of new thought. Southern Methodist University Press. p 174.
  6. ^ Larson, M.A. (1985) New Thought, or, A modern religious approach: The philosophy of health, happiness, and prosperity. Philosophical Library. p 241.