CineAlta

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Sony CineAlta
Logo for CineAlta, accompanied by "CINEALTA" text below logo. The logo is a stylized capital "CA", colored gold.
Type Video camera
Inception 2000 (2000)
Manufacturer Sony
Available Available
Website pro.sony/ue_US/products/digital-cinema-cameras

CineAlta cameras are a series of professional digital movie cameras produced by Sony which replicate many of the same features of 35mm film motion picture cameras.

Concept[edit]

Filming with a CineAlta video

CineAlta is a brand name used by Sony to describe various products involved in content creation, production and exhibition process within digital cinema workflow. Now Sony's products branded as CineAlta include camera, camcorder, recorder, cinema server, and projector. "CineAlta" is a portmanteau of Cine, from cinematography, and Alta, an Italian word for "high".[1]

[edit]

The first CineAlta logo was designed by Hiroki Oka, Chief Art Director of Sony CreativeWorks Corporation, based at the Atsugi Technology Center. The twinned ribbons represent the marriage of film and videotape, arranged in a way to deliberately evoke the infinity symbol, to symbolize the infinite possibilities.[1] The CineAlta logo was updated by Tetsuro Sano and applied for the first time to the F65.[2]

Format[edit]

CineAlta cameras record onto HDCAM tapes, XDCAM Professional Discs, SRMemory, or SxS flash memory cards. They have the ability to shoot at various frame rates including 24fps and a resolution of up to 4K. The camera can be used with a Miranda DVC 802 converter. This allows the camera to output SDI, DV, and multiple HD outputs.

History and use in motion pictures[edit]

In June 1999, George Lucas announced that Episode II of the Star Wars Prequel Trilogy would be the first major motion picture to be shot 100% digitally. Sony and Panavision had teamed up to develop the High Definition 24p camera that Lucas would use to accomplish this and thus the first CineAlta camera was born: the Sony HDW-F900 (also called the Panavision HD-900F after being "panavised"). However, the science-fiction film Vidocq was actually the first released feature that was shot entirely with digital cinematography. Lucas held a private screening of Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones for the Atsugi Technology Center staff, and inserted a credit to specifically thank the Sony engineers at Atsugi for the use of the HDW-F900.[1]

For Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith the more advanced Sony HDC-F950 was used, with higher resolution and better color reproduction than its predecessor. The film was cropped to a 2.40:1 aspect ratio from its native 16:9 frame. As a result, only 817 of the 1080 vertical pixels were actually used; but there is an anamorphic adaptor lens from Canon, which allows shooting in 2.39:1 without losing any pixels. Manuel Huerga's Salvador is the first movie shot with this adaptor.

2002's Russian Ark was recorded in uncompressed high definition video using a Sony HDW-F900. The information was recorded uncompressed onto a hard disk which could hold 100 minutes, thus allowing the entire film to be shot in a single 86 minute take. This was very complicated, as in 2002 there wasn't widely available technology for high capacity hard disk-recording; even less for doing this portably, on battery power, with the camera moving inside and outside, from −23 °C (−9 °F) to 23 °C (73 °F). Four attempts were made to complete the shot which had to be completed in one day due to the Hermitage Museum being closed for the shooting; the first three had to be interrupted due to technical faults, but the fourth attempt was completed successfully. Extra material on the DVD release includes a documentary on the technology used.

Other notable movies that were shot with CineAlta cameras include:

Future[edit]

Sony has announced on several occasions that CineAlta 4K, a 4K production suite including a 4K digital cinema camera, recorder, and production tools, is being developed. With the release of the F65 in January 2012, Sony has begun to create a 4K workflow from acquisition to distribution.

List of CineAlta cameras[edit]

All cameras are made by Sony except where noted:

  • VENICE (2017)[11]
  • F55/F5 (2012)[12]
  • NEX-FS700 (2012)[13]
  • F65 (2011)[12]
  • PMW-F3 (2010)[14]
  • SRW-9000PL (2010)[15]
  • PMW-500 (2010)[16]
  • PDW-F800/700 (2009/2008)[16]
  • F35/F23 (2008)[17]
  • PMW-EX3 (2008)[18]
  • PMW-EX1/EX1R (2007, EX1R in 2009)[18]
  • HDW-F900R (2006)[19]
  • PDW-F350/F330 (2006)[20]
  • HDC-F950 (2003)[21]
  • HDW-F900 (2000)[22]
Sony CineAlta model summary
Model Weight Size[a] Sensor Lens mount Media Framerates Introduced Current
HDW-F900[22] 18 lb
8 kg[b]
5.5 in × 10.4 in × 15.0 in
140 mm × 265 mm × 380 mm
3×​23"
CCD
Special bayonet HDCAM 24,25,30 (1080p)
50,60 (1080i)
2000 No No
HDC-F950[21] 11 lb
5.1 kg
5.2 in × 10.9 in × 14.2 in
133 mm × 276 mm × 360 mm
3×​23"
CCD
Sony bayonet [c] 24 (1080p) 2003 No No
HDW-F900R[19] 12 lb
5.4 kg[b]
5.0 in × 10.6 in × 13.6 in
127 mm × 269 mm × 345 mm
3×​23"
CCD
Special bayonet HDCAM 24,25,30 (1080p)
50, 60 (1080i)
2006 No No
PDW-F350[20] 8.5 lb
3.85 kg[d]
4.9 in × 10.6 in × 12.9 in
124 mm × 268 mm × 328 mm
3×​12"
CCD
Sony ​12" bayonet XDCAM PFD 4–60 (1080p) 2006 No No
PDW-F330[20] 24,25,30 (1080p)
50,60 (1080i)
PMW-EX1/EX1R[18][23] 5.3 lb
2.4 kg[e]
7.01 in × 6.93 in × 12.26 in
178 mm × 176 mm × 311.5 mm[f]
3×​12"
CMOS
Fixed SxS 1–30 (1080p)
1–60 (720p)
2007[24][g] No No
PMW-EX3[18] 4.2 lb
1.9 kg[h]
9.8 in × 8.3 in × 15.7 in
250 mm × 210 mm × 400 mm[f]
EX-mount 2008
F23[17] 11.0 lb
5.0 kg
7.85 in × 8.62 in × 7.79 in
199.3 mm × 219 mm × 197.8 mm
3×​23"
CCD
B4 [i] 1–60 (1080p)[j] 2007[25] No No
F35[17] Super 35
CCD
PL 1–50 (1080p)[j] 2008
PDW-700[16] 9.5 lb
4.3 kg[k]
4.9 in × 10.6 in × 13.1 in
124 mm × 269 mm × 332 mm
3×​23"
CCD
Type 48 bayonet XDCAM PFD 24,25,30 (1080p)
50,60 (1080i)
2008[26] No No
PDW-F800[16] 1–60 (1080p) 2009[27]
PMW-500[16][28] 7.5 lb
3.4 kg
SxS 1–30 (1080p)
1–60 (720p)
2010[29]
SRW-9000PL[15] 15 lb
6.9 kg[l]
5.8 in × 8.3 in × 13.0 in
148 mm × 211 mm × 330 mm
Super 35
CCD
PL HDCAM-SR[m] 24,25,30 (1080p)
50, 60 (1080i)[n]
2010[30][31] No No
F3[14][o] 5.3 lb
2.4 kg
5.9 in × 7.4 in × 8.3 in
151 mm × 189 mm × 210 mm
Super 35
CMOS
FZ[p] SxS[m] 1–30 (1080p)
1–60 (720p)
2010[32] No No
F65[12] 11.0 lb
5.0 kg[q]
8.9 in × 8.0 in × 8.1 in
227 mm × 203 mm × 205 mm
Super 35
CMOS
PL SRMemory[r] 1–60 (8K)
1–120 (4K)
2011[33] Yes Yes
NEX-FS700[13] 3.7 lb
1.68 kg[s]
5.71 in × 7.03 in × 9.27 in
145 mm × 178.5 mm × 235.5 mm
Super 35
CMOS
E MS PRO Duo, SD/SDHC/SDXC[t] 1–240 (1080p) 2012[34] No No
F5[12] 4.9 lb
2.2 kg
5.1 in × 4.9 in × 7.5 in
130 mm × 125 mm × 191 mm
Super 35
CMOS
FZ[p] SxS, AXSM[u] 1–60 (4K)[v]
1–240 (2K)[w]
2012[35] Yes Yes
F55[12]
VENICE[11][x] 8.6 lb
3.9 kg
5.2 in × 6.3 in × 6.8 in
133 mm × 159 mm × 172 mm
Full Frame[y]
CMOS
E[p][z] SxS, 2×AXSM[aa] 1–30 (6K)
1–60 (4K)
2017[36] Yes Yes
Notes
  1. ^ Width × Height × Depth, excluding lenses and protrusions
  2. ^ a b Including lens, battery, and cassette
  3. ^ No onboard recording. Connects to SRW-5000 HDCAM or SRW-1 HDCAM-SR videocasette recorders.
  4. ^ Approximately 12 lb (5.4 kg) with viewfinder, microphone, Professional Disc, and battery
  5. ^ Approximately 6.2 lb (2.8 kg) with battery and SxS card.
  6. ^ a b With lens.
  7. ^ EX1R announced in 2009 with upgraded features.
  8. ^ Approximately 7.9 lb (3.6 kg) with lens, battery and SxS card.
  9. ^ No onboard recording. Connects to SRW-1 HDCAM-SR videocasette recorder. Solid state SRMemory compatible via dockable SR-R1.
  10. ^ a b Requires HKSR-102 to be installed in SRW-1 for 50/60fps in 4:2:2 mode; requires both HKSR-102 and HKSR-103 for 50/60fps in 4:4:4 mode.
  11. ^ 13.2 pounds
    6.0 kilograms with battery, viewfinder, and microphone.
  12. ^ Including lens, battery, and cassette
  13. ^ a b Attaches to SR-R1 via HD-SDI to allow recording to solid state SRMemory.
  14. ^ Variable frame rate 1–60 fps when HKSR-9002 Picture Cache Board is installed.
  15. ^ Available as a kit (with 35mm, 50mm, 85mm T2.0 PL-mount prime lenses, PMW-F3K) and bare body (PMW-F3L)
  16. ^ a b c PL with included adapter
  17. ^ 14 lb (6.5 kg) with accessories
  18. ^ Via external docking recorder SR-R4.
  19. ^ 6.7 lb (3.06 kg) with lens, battery, microphone, handle, viewfinder.
  20. ^ AXSM via optional AXS-R5 recorder and HXR-IFR5 interface units.
  21. ^ Via external docking recorder AXS-R5.
  22. ^ F5 requires optional upgrade for 4K in XAVC.
  23. ^ Limited to 180fps when recording in 2K XAVC
  24. ^ Model number MPC-3610
  25. ^ 36 mm × 24 mm (1.42 in × 0.94 in) sensor size.
  26. ^ Lever-lock variant of E-mount, which allows the rotation of a lever, rather than the lens.
  27. ^ Via external docking recorder AXS-R7.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Feature Design: "CineAlta" Digital Cinema Camera F23". Sony. 13 June 2007. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  2. ^ "Feature Design: "CineAlta" Digital Cinema Camera F65". Sony. 11 June 2012. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  3. ^ "Session 9 Budget / Box Office / Filming Dates, IMDB". Retrieved 2016-04-28.
  4. ^ "Session 9 Technical Specifications, IMDB". Retrieved 2016-04-28.
  5. ^ "Review: 'Session 9', Variety". Retrieved 2016-04-28.
  6. ^ "MovieMaker: How They Did It 'Burning Annie'".
  7. ^ "Once Upon a Time in Mexico Technical Specifications, IMDB". Retrieved 2009-01-31.
  8. ^ "Zebraman Technical Specifications, IMDB". Retrieved 2011-08-24.
  9. ^ "HD World: The World of High Definition, Created by Sony" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-01-31. Retrieved 2007-05-15.
  10. ^ Goldstein, Gregg (2006-10-31). "Mysterious ways: U2 in 3-D concert film". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 2007-04-07.
  11. ^ a b "VENICE" (PDF). Sony. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  12. ^ a b c d e "CineAlta Catalog 2015" (PDF). Sony. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  13. ^ a b "NEX-FS700: Full-HD Super Slow Motion NXCAM Camcorder" (PDF). Sony. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  14. ^ a b "PMW-F3L". Sony. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  15. ^ a b "SRW-9000PL". Sony. Retrieved 24 September 2018.
  16. ^ a b c d e "XDCAM HD422 Family" (PDF). Sony. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  17. ^ a b c "Digital Cinematography Camera F35 / F23" (PDF). Sony. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  18. ^ a b c d "XDCAM EX" (PDF). Sony. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  19. ^ a b "HDW-F900R Sony Digital Camcorder" (PDF). Sony. 2006. Archived (PDF) from the original on 24 September 2018. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  20. ^ a b c "XDCAM HD Professional Disc System" (PDF). Sony. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 May 2006. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  21. ^ a b "Sony Digital 4:4:4 HD Camera System HDC-F950 / HDCU-F950" (PDF). Sony. 2003. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2005. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  22. ^ a b "HDW-F900 Sony Digital Camcorder" (PDF). Sony. 2006. Archived (PDF) from the original on 30 September 2018. Retrieved 30 September 2018.
  23. ^ "Full HD solid-state camcorder. PMW-EX1R" (PDF). Sony. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  24. ^ Young, Rick (23 October 2009). "Sony announces replacement for the PMW-EX1". Network World. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  25. ^ "[Inter BEE 2006]Sony reveals a new lineup for accelerating HD World" (Press release). Sony. November 15, 2006. Retrieved 30 September 2008.
  26. ^ Stuart, Mark (April 2008). "XDCAM HD: Sony's 2/3rd-inch XDCAM HD PDW-700 is here" (PDF). DVuser Magazine. pp. 6–12. Retrieved 30 September 2018.
  27. ^ Frazer, Bryant (19 April 2009). "Sony Stretches XDCAM HD, HDCAM SR Offerings at NAB". Studio Daily. Retrieved 30 September 2018.
  28. ^ "PMW-500 Solid-State Memory Camcorder" (PDF). Sony. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  29. ^ Frazer, Bryant (10 September 2010). "Sony Introduces XDCAM PMW-500, Recording 4:2:2 HD to SxS Memory Cards". Studio Daily. Retrieved 30 September 2018.
  30. ^ Schubin, Mark (September 2010). "Electronic Image Acquisition Progress Report". SMPTE Motion Imaging Journal. pp. 67–69. Retrieved 30 September 2018.
  31. ^ "Sony SRW-9000PL" (PDF). Film and Digital Times. p. 21. Retrieved 30 September 2018.
  32. ^ Wilt, Adam (November 10, 2010). "Sony PMW-F3 Announced". Pro Video Coalition. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  33. ^ "Sony Launches F65 CineAlta Camera and Unveils End-to-End 4K Workflow for Digital Cinematography" (Press release). Sony. 6 September 2011. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  34. ^ "Sony announces NEX-FS700 '4k-ready' E-mount camcorder". Digital Photography Review. 2 April 2012. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  35. ^ Murie, Michael (31 October 2012). "Sony Announces F5, F55 and Other Toys". Filmmaker Magazine. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  36. ^ Allard, Matthew (6 September 2017). "Sony unveils VENICE – 36x24mm full-frame digital motion picture camera system". News Shooter. Retrieved 23 September 2018.

External links[edit]