Daphne Akhurst

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Daphne Akhurst Cozens
Daphne Akhurst 1925.jpg
Full name Daphne Jessie Akhurst Cozens
Country (sports)  Australia
Born (1903-04-22)22 April 1903
Ashfield, NSW, Australia
Died 9 January 1933(1933-01-09) (aged 29)
Sydney, Australia
Plays Right-handed
Int. Tennis HoF 2013 (member page)
Singles
Highest ranking No. 3 (1928, A. Wallis Myers)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open W (1925, 1926, 1928, 1929, 1930)
French Open QF (1928)
Wimbledon SF (1928)
Doubles
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open W (1924, 1925, 1928, 1929, 1931)
French Open QF (1928)
Wimbledon SF (1928)
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Australian Open W (1924, 1925, 1928, 1929)
French Open QF (1928)
Wimbledon F (1928)
The Daphne Akhurst Memorial Cup

Daphne Akhurst Cozens (Daphne Jessie Akhurst; 22 April 1903 – 9 January 1933) was an Australian tennis player who won the women's singles title at the Australian Championships five times between 1925 and 1930. According to Wallis Myers (Daily Telegraph, Daily Mail), she was ranked World No. 3 in 1928.[1]

Career[edit]

The second daughter of Oscar James Akhurst, a lithographer, and his wife Jessie Florence (née Smith), Daphne Akhurst won the women's singles title at the Australian Championships five times, in 1925, 1926, 1928, 1929, and 1930. She is fourth on the list of most women's singles titles at the Australian Championships; behind only Margaret Court with eleven titles and Nancye Wynne Bolton and Serena Williams with six titles. She won the women's doubles title at the Australian Championships five times: in 1924 and 1925 with Sylvia Lance Harper, in 1928 with Esna Boyd Robertson, and in 1929 and 1931 with Louie Bickerton. She and Marjorie Cox were the runners-up in 1926.[citation needed]

In 1925 she was part of the first Australian women's team to tour Europe and reached the quarterfinal of the singles event at Wimbledon which she lost to Joan Fry.[2] During her second and last European tour in 1928, she reached the singles quarterfinal at the French Championships, in which Cristobel Hardie defeated her, and the semifinal at Wimbledon, which she lost in straight sets to Lili de Alvarez.

Akhurst won the mixed doubles title at the Australian Championships four times: in 1924 and 1925 with Jim Willard, in 1928 with Jean Borotra, and in 1929 with Gar Moon. She and Willard were the runners-up in 1926. She and her partner Jack Crawford reached the mixed doubles final at Wimbledon in 1928, but lost to the team of Elizabeth Ryan/Patrick Spence, 7–5, 6–4.

Personal life[edit]

Akhurst attended the Miss. E. Tildesley's Normanhurst School, followed by the Sydney Conservatorium of Music.[3] On 26 February 1930 at St Philip's Church of England, Sydney, Daphne Akhurst married Royston Stuckey Cozens, a tobacco manufacturer, and retired from serious competition soon after winning the Australian ladies' doubles championship in 1931. They had one son, Don. Daphne Akhurst Cozens died on 9 January 1933, aged 29, from an ectopic pregnancy and was cremated.[2]

Legacy[edit]

Since 1934 the trophy presented each year to the winner of the women's singles at the Australian Open is named the Daphne Akhurst Memorial Cup in her honour.[3] She was inducted into the Australian Tennis Hall of Fame on Australia Day (26 January), 2006.[4] She was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 2013.

Grand Slam finals[edit]

Singles (5 titles, 0 runner-ups)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Opponent in final Score in final
Winner 1925 Australian Championships Australia Esna Boyd 1–6, 8–6, 6–4
Winner 1926 Australian Championships Australia Esna Boyd Robertson 6–1, 6–3
Winner 1928 Australian Championships Australia Esna Boyd Robertson 7–5, 6–2
Winner 1929 Australian Championships Australia Louie Bickerton 6–1, 5–7, 6–2
Winner 1930 Australian Championships Australia Sylvia Lance Harper 10–8, 2–6, 7–5

Doubles (5 titles, 1 runner-up)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Partner Opponents in final Score in final
Winner 1924 Australian Championships Australia Sylvia Lance Harper Australia Kathleen Le Messurier
Australia Meryl O'Hara Wood
7–5, 6–2
Winner 1925 Australian Championships Australia Sylvia Lance Harper Australia Esna Boyd
Australia Kathleen Le Messurier
6–4, 6–3
Runner-up 1926 Australian Championships Australia Marjorie Cox Crawford Australia Esna Boyd
Australia Meryl O'Hara Wood
3–6, 8–6, 6–8
Winner 1928 Australian Championships Australia Esna Boyd Australia Kathleen Le Messurier
United Kingdom Dorothy Weston
6–3, 6–8, 8–6
Winner 1929 Australian Championships Australia Louie Bickerton Australia Sylvia Lance Harper
Australia Meryl O'Hara Wood
6–2, 3–6, 6–2
Winner 1931 Australian Championships Australia Louie Bickerton Australia Nell Lloyd
Australia Lorna Utz
6–0, 6–4

Grand Slam singles tournament timeline[edit]

Tournament 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 Career SR
Australian Championships SF W W 2R W W W 5 / 7
French Championships1 NH A A A QF A A 0 / 1
Wimbledon A QF A A SF A A 0 / 2
US Championships A A A A A A A 0 / 0
SR 0 / 1 1 / 2 1 / 1 0 / 1 1 / 3 1 / 1 1 / 1 5 / 10
  • NH = tournament not held.
  • A = did not participate in the tournament.
  • SR = the ratio of the number of Grand Slam singles tournaments won to the number of those tournaments played.

1The French Championships were not held in 1924, as the Olympics were held in Paris that year.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Collins, Bud (2008). The Bud Collins History of Tennis: An Authoritative Encyclopedia and Record Book. New York, NY: New Chapter Press. pp. 695, 701. ISBN 0-942257-41-3. 
  2. ^ a b "Mrs. Roy Cozens". The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) (Hobart, Tas.: National Library of Australia). 11 January 1933. p. 9. 
  3. ^ a b Grasso, John (2011). Historical Dictionary of Tennis. Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press. p. 22. ISBN 978-0810872370. 
  4. ^ "Player Profiles – Daphne Akhurst". Tennis Australia. Retrieved 26 July 2012. 

External links[edit]