Debian version history

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A screenshot of Debian 10 (Buster) with the GNOME desktop environment

Debian releases do not follow a fixed schedule. Recent releases have been made roughly biennially by the Debian Project.

Debian always has at least three release branches active at any time: "stable", "testing" and "unstable".[1] The stable release is the most recent and up-to-date version of Debian. The testing release contains packages that have been tested from unstable. Testing has significantly more up-to-date packages than stable and is a close version of the future release candidate for stable. The unstable release (also known as sid) is the release where active development takes place. It is the most volatile version of Debian.

When the Debian stable branch is replaced with a newer release, the current stable becomes an "oldstable" release. When the Debian stable branch is replaced again, the oldstable release becomes the "oldoldstable" release. Oldoldstable is eventually moved to the archived releases repository.[citation needed]

The most recent version of Debian is Debian version 10, codename "Buster". The next up and coming release of Debian is Debian 11 codename "Bullseye" with a planned release date of 14 August 2021.[2]

Debian distribution codenames are based on the names of characters from the Toy Story films. Debian's unstable trunk is named after Sid, a character who regularly destroyed his toys.[3]

Release history[edit]

Debian 1.0 was never released, as a vendor accidentally shipped a development release with that version number. The package management system dpkg and its front-end dselect were developed and implemented on Debian in a previous release. A transition from the a.out binary format to the ELF binary format had already begun before the planned 1.0 release. The only supported architecture was Intel 80386 (i386).[4]

Debian 1.1 (Buzz)[edit]

Debian 1.1 (Buzz), released 17 June 1996, contained 474 packages. Debian had fully transitioned to the ELF binary format and used Linux kernel 2.0.[5]

Debian 1.2 (Rex)[edit]

Debian 1.2 (Rex), released 12 December 1996, contained 848 packages maintained by 120 developers.[6]

Debian 1.3 (Bo)[edit]

Debian 1.3 (Bo), released 5 June 1997, contained 974 packages maintained by 200 developers.[7]

Point releases:

Debian 2.0 (Hamm)[edit]

Debian 2.0 (Hamm), released 24 July 1998, contained over 1,500 packages maintained by over 400 developers. A transition was made to libc6 and Debian was ported to the Motorola 68000 series (m68k) architectures.[10]

Point releases:

  • 2.0r1 (24 July 1998; 23 years ago (1998-07-24))[11]
  • 2.0r2 (29 August 1998; 22 years ago (1998-08-29))[citation needed]
  • 2.0r3 (21 September 1998; 22 years ago (1998-09-21))[citation needed]
  • 2.0r4 (7 December 1998; 22 years ago (1998-12-07))[citation needed]
  • 2.0r5 (15 March 1999; 22 years ago (1999-03-15))[citation needed]

Debian 2.1 (Slink)[edit]

Debian 2.1 (Slink), released 9 March 1999,[12] contained about 2,250 packages. The front-end APT was introduced for the package management system and Debian was ported to Alpha and SPARC.[13][14]

Point releases:

  • 2.1r1 (Possibly never released)[15]
  • 2.1r2 (27 June 1999; 22 years ago (1999-06-27))[16]
  • 2.1r3 (4 September 1999; 21 years ago (1999-09-04))[17]
  • 2.1r4 (15 December 1999; 21 years ago (1999-12-15))[18]
  • 2.1r5 (16 February 2000; 21 years ago (2000-02-16))[19]

Debian 2.2 (Potato)[edit]

Debian 2.2 (Potato), released 14–15 August 2000, contained 2,600 packages maintained by more than 450 developers. New packages included the display manager GDM, the directory service OpenLDAP, the security software OpenSSH and the mail transfer agent Postfix. Debian was ported to the PowerPC and ARM architectures.[20][21][22]

Point releases:

  • 2.2r1 (14 November 2000; 20 years ago (2000-11-14))[23]
  • 2.2r2 (5 December 2000; 20 years ago (2000-12-05))[24]
  • 2.2r3 (17 April 2001; 20 years ago (2001-04-17))[25]
  • 2.2r4 (5 November 2001; 19 years ago (2001-11-05))[26]
  • 2.2r5 (10 January 2002; 19 years ago (2002-01-10))[27]
  • 2.2r6 (3 April 2002; 19 years ago (2002-04-03))[28]
  • 2.2r7 (13 July 2002; 19 years ago (2002-07-13))[29]

Debian 3.0 (Woody)[edit]

Debian 3.0 (Woody), released 19 July 2002, contained around 8,500 packages maintained by more than 900 developers. KDE was introduced and Debian was ported to the following architectures: IA-64, PA-RISC (hppa), mips and mipsel and IBM ESA/390 (s390).[30][31][32]

Point releases:

  • 3.0r1 (16 December 2002; 18 years ago (2002-12-16))[33]
  • 3.0r2 (21 November 2003; 17 years ago (2003-11-21))[34]
  • 3.0r3 (26 October 2004; 16 years ago (2004-10-26))[35]
  • 3.0r4 (1 January 2005; 16 years ago (2005-01-01))[36]
  • 3.0r5 (16 April 2005; 16 years ago (2005-04-16))[37]
  • 3.0r6 (2 June 2005; 16 years ago (2005-06-02))[38]

Debian 3.1 (Sarge)[edit]

Debian 3.1 (Sarge), released 6 June 2005, contained around 15,400 packages. debian-installer and OpenOffice.org were introduced.[39][40]

Point releases:

  • 3.1r1 (20 December 2005; 15 years ago (2005-12-20))[41][42]
  • 3.1r2 (19 April 2006; 15 years ago (2006-04-19))[43][44]
  • 3.1r3 (1 September 2006; 14 years ago (2006-09-01))[45][46]
  • 3.1r4 (6 November 2006; 14 years ago (2006-11-06))[47][48]
  • 3.1r5 (18 February 2007; 14 years ago (2007-02-18))[49][50]
  • 3.1r6 (7 April 2007; 14 years ago (2007-04-07))[51][52]
  • 3.1r7 (28 December 2007; 13 years ago (2007-12-28))[53][54]
  • 3.1r8 (13 April 2008; 13 years ago (2008-04-13)) this is the final update for codename Sarge.[55][56]

Debian 4.0 (Etch)[edit]

Debian 4.0 (Etch)

Debian 4.0 (Etch), released 8 April 2007, contained around 18,000 packages maintained by more than 1,030 developers. Debian was ported to x86-64 (amd64) and support for the Motorola 68000 series (m68k) architecture was dropped.[57][58] This version introduced utf-8 and udev device management by default.

Point releases:

  • 4.0r1 (17 August 2007; 13 years ago (2007-08-17))[59][60]
  • 4.0r2 (27 December 2007; 13 years ago (2007-12-27))[61][62]
  • 4.0r3 (17 February 2008; 13 years ago (2008-02-17))[63][64]
  • 4.0r4 (26 July 2008; 13 years ago (2008-07-26))[65][66]
  • 4.0r5 (23 October 2008; 12 years ago (2008-10-23))[67][68]
  • 4.0r6 (18 December 2008; 12 years ago (2008-12-18))[69][70]
  • 4.0r7 (10 February 2009; 12 years ago (2009-02-10))[71][72]
  • 4.0r8 (8 April 2009; 12 years ago (2009-04-08))[73][74]
  • 4.0r9 (22 May 2010; 11 years ago (2010-05-22)) this is the final update for codename Etch[75][76]

Debian 5.0 (Lenny)[edit]

Debian 5.0 (Lenny)

Debian 5.0 (Lenny), released 14 February 2009, contained more than 23,000 packages. Debian was ported to the ARM EABI (armel) architecture.[77][78][79]

Point releases:

  • 5.0.1 (11 April 2009; 12 years ago (2009-04-11))[80][81]
  • 5.0.2 (27 June 2009; 12 years ago (2009-06-27))[82][83]
  • 5.0.3 (5 September 2009; 11 years ago (2009-09-05))[84][85]
  • 5.0.4 (30 January 2010; 11 years ago (2010-01-30))[86][87]
  • 5.0.5 (26 July 2010; 11 years ago (2010-07-26))[88][89]
  • 5.0.6 (4 September 2010; 10 years ago (2010-09-04))[90][91]
  • 5.0.7 (27 November 2010; 10 years ago (2010-11-27))[92]
  • 5.0.8 (22 January 2011; 10 years ago (2011-01-22))[93]
  • 5.0.9 (22 January 2011; 10 years ago (2011-01-22))[94]
  • 5.0.10 (10 March 2012; 9 years ago (2012-03-10)) this is the final update for codename Lenny.[95]

Debian 6.0 (Squeeze)[edit]

Debian 6.0 (Squeeze) in Spanish

Debian 6.0 (Squeeze), released 6 February 2011, contained more than 29,000 packages. The default Linux kernel included was deblobbed beginning with this release. The web browser Chromium was introduced and Debian was ported to the kfreebsd-i386 and kfreebsd-amd64 architectures (while that port was later discontinued), and support for the Intel 486, Alpha, and PA-RISC (hppa) architectures was dropped.[96][97][98][99]

Squeeze was the first release of Debian in which non-free firmware components (aka "binary blobs") were excluded from the "main" repository as a matter of policy.[100][101][102][103]

Point releases:

  • 6.0.1 (19 March 2011; 10 years ago (2011-03-19))[104]
  • 6.0.2 (25 June 2011; 10 years ago (2011-06-25))[105]
  • 6.0.3 (8 October 2011; 9 years ago (2011-10-08))[106]
  • 6.0.4 (28 January 2012; 9 years ago (2012-01-28))[107]
  • 6.0.5 (12 May 2012; 9 years ago (2012-05-12))[108]
  • 6.0.6 (29 September 2012; 8 years ago (2012-09-29))[109]
  • 6.0.7 (23 February 2013; 8 years ago (2013-02-23))[110]
  • 6.0.8 (20 October 2013; 7 years ago (2013-10-20))[111]
  • 6.0.9 (15 February 2014; 7 years ago (2014-02-15))[112]
  • 6.0.10 (19 June 2014; 7 years ago (2014-06-19)) this is the final update for codename Squeeze.[113]
  • Squeeze long term support reaches end-of-life (29 February 2016; 5 years ago (2016-02-29))[114]

Debian 7 (Wheezy)[edit]

MATE on Debian 7 (Wheezy)

Debian 7 (Wheezy), released 4 May 2013, contained more than 36,000 packages. Support for UEFI was added and Debian was ported to the armhf and IBM ESA/390 (s390x) architectures.[115][116][117][118]

Point releases:

  • 7.1 (15 June 2013; 8 years ago (2013-06-15))[119]
  • 7.2 (12 October 2013; 7 years ago (2013-10-12))[120]
  • 7.3 (14 December 2013; 7 years ago (2013-12-14))[121]
  • 7.4 (8 February 2014; 7 years ago (2014-02-08))[122]
  • 7.5 (26 April 2014; 7 years ago (2014-04-26))[123]
  • 7.6 (12 July 2014; 7 years ago (2014-07-12))[124]
  • 7.7 (18 October 2014; 6 years ago (2014-10-18))[125]
  • 7.8 (10 January 2015; 6 years ago (2015-01-10))[126]
  • Debian 8.0 codename Jessie releases, Wheezy becomes oldstable (25 April 2015; 6 years ago (2015-04-25))
  • 7.9 (5 September 2015; 5 years ago (2015-09-05))[127]
  • 7.10 (2 April 2016; 5 years ago (2016-04-02))[128]
  • 7.11 (4 June 2016; 5 years ago (2016-06-04)) this is the final update for codename Wheezy.[129]
  • Debian 9.0 codename Stretch releases, Wheezy becomes oldoldstable (17 June 2017; 4 years ago (2017-06-17))
  • Wheezy long term support reaches end-of-life (1 June 2018; 3 years ago (2018-06-01))[130]
  • Wheezy extended long term support reaches end-of-life (30 June 2020; 13 months ago (2020-06-30)).[citation needed]

Debian 8 (Jessie)[edit]

Debian 8 (Jessie)

Debian 8 (Jessie), released 25 April 2015, contained more than 43,000 packages, with systemd installed by default instead of init. (sysvinit and upstart packages are provided as alternatives.) Debian was ported to the ARM64 and ppc64le architectures, while support for the IA-64, kfreebsd-amd64 and kfreebsd-i386, IBM ESA/390 (s390) (only the 31-bit variant; the newer 64-bit s390x was retained) and SPARC architectures were dropped.[131][132][133]

Long term support ended June 2020.[134]

Point releases:

  • 8.1 (6 June 2015; 6 years ago (2015-06-06))[135]
  • 8.2 (5 September 2015; 5 years ago (2015-09-05))[136]
  • 8.3 (23 January 2016; 5 years ago (2016-01-23))[137]
  • 8.4 (2 April 2016; 5 years ago (2016-04-02))[138]
  • 8.5 (4 June 2016; 5 years ago (2016-06-04))[139]
  • 8.6 (17 September 2016; 4 years ago (2016-09-17))[140]
  • 8.7 (14 January 2017; 4 years ago (2017-01-14))[141]
  • 8.8 (6 May 2017; 4 years ago (2017-05-06))[142]
  • Debian 9.0 codename Stretch releases, Jessie becomes oldstable (17 June 2017; 4 years ago (2017-06-17))
  • 8.9 (22 July 2017; 4 years ago (2017-07-22))[143]
  • 8.10 (9 December 2017; 3 years ago (2017-12-09))[144]
  • Regular security support updates have been discontinued (17 June 2018; 3 years ago (2018-06-17))[145]
  • 8.11 (23 June 2018; 3 years ago (2018-06-23)) this is the final update for codename Jessie.[146]
  • Debian 10.0 codename Buster releases, Jessie becomes oldoldstable (6 July 2019; 2 years ago (2019-07-06))
  • Jessie long term support reaches end-of-life (30 June 2020; 13 months ago (2020-06-30))[130]
  • Jessie extended long term support reaches end-of-life (30 June 2022; 10 months' time (2022-06-30))[citation needed]

Debian 9 (Stretch)[edit]

Debian 9 (Stretch) with GNOME

Debian 9 (Stretch) was released on 17 June 2017, two years and two months after Debian 8.0, and contained more than 51,000 packages.[147] The final minor update, called a "point release", is version 9.13,[148] released on 18 July 2020; 12 months ago (2020-07-18). Major upgrades include the Linux kernel going from version 3.16 to 4.9, GNOME desktop version going from 3.14 to 3.22, KDE Plasma 4 was upgraded to Plasma 5, LibreOffice 4.3 upgraded to 5.2 and Qt upgraded from 4.8 to 5.7. LXQt has been added as well.

The Intel i586 (Pentium), i586/i686 hybrid and PowerPC architectures are no longer supported as of Stretch.[149][150][151]

Point releases:

  • 9.1 (22 July 2017; 4 years ago (2017-07-22))[152]
  • 9.2 (7 October 2017; 3 years ago (2017-10-07))[153]
  • 9.3 (9 December 2017; 3 years ago (2017-12-09))[154]
  • 9.4 (10 March 2018; 3 years ago (2018-03-10))[155]
  • 9.5 (14 July 2018; 3 years ago (2018-07-14))[156]
  • 9.6 (10 November 2018; 2 years ago (2018-11-10))[157]
  • 9.7 (23 January 2019; 2 years ago (2019-01-23))[158]
  • 9.8 (16 February 2019; 2 years ago (2019-02-16))[159]
  • 9.9 (27 April 2019; 2 years ago (2019-04-27))[160]
  • Stretch becomes oldstable, Buster is the current stable release (6 July 2019; 2 years ago (2019-07-06))
  • 9.10 (7 September 2019; 22 months ago (2019-09-07))[161]
  • 9.11 (8 September 2019; 22 months ago (2019-09-08))[162]
  • 9.12 (8 February 2020; 17 months ago (2020-02-08))[163]
  • 9.13 (18 July 2020; 12 months ago (2020-07-18)) this is the final update for codename Stretch.[164]
  • Stretch long term support reaches end-of-life (30 June 2022; 10 months' time (2022-06-30))[165]

Debian 10 (Buster)[edit]

Debian 10 (Buster) with GNOME

Debian 10 (Buster) was released on 6 July 2019; 2 years ago (2019-07-06), two years and a month after Debian 9 (Stretch).[166] Debian 10 contains 57,703 packages, supports UEFI Secure Boot,[167] has AppArmor enabled by default, uses LUKS2 as the default LUKS format, and uses Wayland for GNOME by default.[citation needed]

Debian 10 ships with Linux kernel version 4.19.[168] Available desktops include Cinnamon 3.8, GNOME 3.30, KDE Plasma 5.14, LXDE 0.99.2, LXQt 0.14, MATE 1.20, Xfce 4.12. Key application software includes LibreOffice 6.1 for office productivity, VLC 3.0 for media viewing, and Firefox ESR for web browsing.[169]

Point releases:

  • 10.1 (7 September 2019; 22 months ago (2019-09-07))[170][171]
  • 10.2 (16 November 2019; 20 months ago (2019-11-16))[172]
  • 10.3 (8 February 2020; 17 months ago (2020-02-08))[173]
  • 10.4 (9 May 2020; 14 months ago (2020-05-09))[174]
  • 10.5 (1 August 2020; 12 months ago (2020-08-01))[175]
  • 10.6 (26 September 2020; 10 months ago (2020-09-26))[176]
  • 10.7 (5 December 2020; 7 months ago (2020-12-05))[177]
  • 10.8 (6 February 2021; 5 months ago (2021-02-06))[178]
  • 10.9 (27 March 2021; 4 months ago (2021-03-27))[179]
  • 10.10 (19 June 2021; 46 days ago (2021-06-19))[180]

Debian 11 (Bullseye)[edit]

A preview version of Debian Bullseye with GNOME and sample applications open

Debian 11 (Bullseye) is the upcoming release of the operating system. It is scheduled to be released on 14 August 2021.[2]

On 12 November 2020, it was announced that "Homeworld", by Juliette Taka, will be the default theme for Debian 11, after winning a public poll held with eighteen choices.[181]

Bullseye is dropping the remaining Qt4/KDE 4 libraries and Python 2.[182][183] The first of the code freezes, readying Debian 11 for release, began on 12 January 2021.[184]

Development freeze timetable:

  • January 12, 2021: transition freeze[184]
  • February 12, 2021: soft freeze[185]
  • March 12, 2021: hard freeze[186]
  • July 17, 2021: full freeze

Bullseye will not support the older big-endian 32-bit MIPS architectures.[187]

Bullseye is expected to ship with Qt 5.15 and KDE Plasma 5.20.[188] Bullseye is not expected to have LTO enabled by default.[189]

Bullseye's release date has been set for 14 August 2021.[190]

Debian 12 (Bookworm)[edit]

Bookworm is expected to have link-time optimization (LTO) enabled by default.[189]

Debian 12 is not expected to have Qt 6 as there isn't an active maintainer for it.[191]

Debian 13 (Trixie)[edit]

Trixie is expected to be the codename for Debian 13.[192]

Release table[edit]

Ver. Code­name Release date Archs Package count Linux
kernel
End of support References
Binary Source Security Long-term Freexian ELTS[a]
Old version, no longer maintained: 0.90 Old version, no longer maintained: August–December 1993 1 N/A N/A N/A N/A None None [4]
Old version, no longer maintained: 0.91 Old version, no longer maintained: January 1994 N/A N/A 0.99.14w N/A [4]
Old version, no longer maintained: 0.93R5 Old version, no longer maintained: March 1995 N/A N/A N/A N/A [4]
Old version, no longer maintained: 0.93R6 Old version, no longer maintained: November 1995 N/A N/A N/A N/A [4]
Old version, no longer maintained: 1.0 Old version, no longer maintained: Never released N/A N/A N/A N/A [4]
Old version, no longer maintained: 1.1 Old version, no longer maintained: Buzz 17 June 1996 474 N/A 2.0 N/A [4]
Old version, no longer maintained: 1.2 Old version, no longer maintained: Rex 12 December 1996 848 N/A 2.0.27 N/A [4][195]
Old version, no longer maintained: 1.3 Old version, no longer maintained: Bo 5 June 1997 974 N/A 2.0.33 N/A [4]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.0 Old version, no longer maintained: Hamm 24 July 1998 2 ≈1,500 N/A 2.0.34 N/A [4]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.1 Old version, no longer maintained: Slink 9 March 1999 4 ≈2,250 N/A 2.0.34, 2.0.35,
2.0.36, 2.0.38
30 October 2000 [4][14][196]
Old version, no longer maintained: 2.2 Old version, no longer maintained: Potato 14–15 August 2000 6 ≈3,900 N/A 2.0.38, 2.2.19 30 June 2003 [4][21][22]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.0 Old version, no longer maintained: Woody 19 July 2002 11 ≈8,500 N/A 2.2.20, 2.4.18 30 June 2006 [4][31][32][197]
Old version, no longer maintained: 3.1 Old version, no longer maintained: Sarge 6 June 2005 ≈15,400 N/A 2.4.27, 2.6.8 31 March 2008 [4][40][198]
Old version, no longer maintained: 4.0 Old version, no longer maintained: Etch 8 April 2007 ≈18,000 N/A 2.6.18 15 February 2010 [4][58][199]
Old version, no longer maintained: 5.0 Old version, no longer maintained: Lenny 14 February 2009 12 ≈23,000 ≈12,000 2.6.26 6 February 2012 [4][78][79]
Old version, no longer maintained: 6.0 Old version, no longer maintained: Squeeze 6 February 2011 11 ≈29,000 ≈15,000 2.6.32 19 July 2014 29 February 2016 [4][98][99][200][201]
Old version, no longer maintained: 7 Old version, no longer maintained: Wheezy 4 May 2013 13 ≈36,000 ≈17,500 3.2 4 June 2016 31 May 2018 30 June 2020 [4][116][117][202][200][193]
Old version, no longer maintained: 8 Old version, no longer maintained: Jessie 25–26 April 2015 10 ≈43,000 ≈20,000 3.16 17 June 2018 30 June 2020 30 June 2022 [4][203][133][200][204][193]
Older version, yet still maintained: 9 Older version, yet still maintained: Stretch 17 June 2017 ≈51,000 ≈25,000 4.9 18 July 2020 30 June 2022 N/A [4][147][205][206][200][193]
Current stable version: 10 Current stable version: Buster 6 July 2019 ≈59,000 ≈29,000 4.19 July 2022 June 2024 N/A [166][207]
Future release: 11 Future release: Bullseye 14 August 2021 TBA TBA TBA 5.10 TBA TBA N/A [208]
Future release: 12 Future release: Bookworm TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA N/A [209]
Future release: 13 Future release: Trixie TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA N/A [192]
unstable Sid Rolling release 22[b] >62,000[c] >32,000[c] 5.10.26[d] N/A N/A N/A
Legend:
Old version
Older version, still maintained
Latest version
Latest preview version
Future release
  1. ^ Extended long-term support (ELTS) provided by Freexian[193] but made available to all Debian users, as noted on official Debian pages. There is no kernel support, and only sponsored packages are supported.[194]
  2. ^ Only 9 are candidates for stable releases for Bullseye.
  3. ^ a b As of March 2021
  4. ^ As of April 2021

When a release transitions to long-term support phase (LTS-phase), security is no longer handled by the main Debian security team.[210] Only a subset of Debian architectures are eligible for Long Term Support, and there is no support for packages in backports.[211]

Release timeline[edit]

Port timeline[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Debian Releases". 30 December 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2021.
  2. ^ a b "bullseye release planned on 2021-08-14 and the last weeks up to the release". 23 July 2021. Retrieved 24 July 2021.
  3. ^ "Debian Releases - Codenames". Debian Wiki. Debian Wiki. Archived from the original on 30 September 2017. Retrieved 25 July 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t "A Brief History of Debian". The Debian Project. Archived from the original on 21 December 2015. Retrieved 23 November 2015.
  5. ^ "A Brief History of Debian". The Debian Project. Archived from the original on 21 December 2015. Retrieved 23 November 2015. Debian 1.1 Buzz (June 17th, 1996): This was the first Debian release with a code name. It was taken, like all others so far, from a character in one of the Toy Story movies... in this case, Buzz Lightyear. By this time, Bruce Perens had taken over leadership of the Project from Ian Murdock, and Bruce was working at Pixar, the company that produced the movies. This release was fully ELF, used Linux kernel 2.0, and contained 474 packages.
  6. ^ "A Brief History of Debian". The Debian Project. Archived from the original on 21 December 2015. Retrieved 23 November 2015. Rex is the code name for a former Stable Debian distribution.It was released on December 12th, 1996 as Debian GNU/Linux 1.2: Named for the plastic dinosaur in the Toy Story movies. This release consisted of 848 packages maintained by 120 developers. It was superseded by DebianBo on June 5th, 1997.Rex is now obsolete and security updates are no longer provided.
  7. ^ "A Brief History of Debian". The Debian Project. Archived from the original on 21 December 2015. Retrieved 23 November 2015. Debian 1.3 Bo (June 5th, 1997): Named for Bo Peep, the shepherdess. This release consisted of 974 packages maintained by 200 developers.
  8. ^ "Debian 1.3.1 Released". 8 July 1997. Retrieved 13 May 2021.
  9. ^ "Revised Debian CD Available". 3 February 1998. Retrieved 13 May 2021.
  10. ^ "A Brief History of Debian". The Debian Project. Archived from the original on 21 December 2015. Retrieved 23 November 2015. Debian 2.0 Hamm (July 24th, 1998): Named for the piggy-bank in the Toy Story movies. This was the first multi-architecture release of Debian, adding support for the Motorola 68000 series architectures. With Ian Jackson as Project Leader, this release made the transition to libc6, and consisted of over 1500 packages maintained by over 400 developers.
  11. ^ "security updates webpage". 24 October 1998. Retrieved 13 May 2021.
  12. ^ "Release of Debian 2.1". 9 March 1999. Retrieved 13 May 2021.
  13. ^ "A Brief History of Debian". The Debian Project. Archived from the original on 21 December 2015. Retrieved 23 November 2015. Debian 2.1 Slink (March 9th, 1999): Named for the slinky-dog in the movie. Two more architectures were added, Alpha and SPARC. With Wichert Akkerman as Project Leader, this release consisted of about 2250 packages and required 2 CDs in the official set. The key technical innovation was the introduction of apt, a new package management interface. Widely emulated, apt addressed issues resulting from Debian's continuing growth, and established a new paradigm for package acquisition and installation on Open Source operating systems.
  14. ^ "Re: CD-Image of latest release". 5 May 1999. Retrieved 13 May 2021.
  15. ^ "2.1r2 images". 27 June 1999. Retrieved 13 May 2021.
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