Dota Pro Circuit

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Dota Pro Circuit
Genre Dota 2 professional tournament circuit
Frequency Annual
Years active 2017–present
Organized by Valve Corporation
Website www.dota2.com/procircuit

The Dota Pro Circuit (DPC) is a professional competitive ranking system of the video game, Dota 2. It was introduced in 2017 by the game's developer, Valve Corporation, to determine which teams are eligible to obtain a direct invitation to The International, an annual tournament directly administrated by them which acts as the premier tournament for the game.[1][2]

Format[edit]

In the Dota Pro Circuit, any Dota 2 tournament that has at least one team from the North American, South American, Southeast Asian, Chinese, European, and Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) regions, a minimum prize pool of $500,000, which Valve adds $500,000 of their own towards, and concludes with a LAN finals is classified as a "Major".[3] In addition, a "Minor" championship tier exists and follows the same rules, but with a minimum prize pool of $150,000 instead.[3] For the Circuit, Valve awards "Qualifying Points" for individual players on a team that finishes in the top four of a tournament, which are publicly listed on a leaderboard and award direct invitations to The International for the eighth best ranking teams, a practice that was previously done manually by Valve and criticized for being non-transparent and unpredictable.[4][5][6][7] The eight teams with the highest DPC qualifying points received direct invitations to The International 2018.[1][8] To avoid conflicting dates, Valve directly manages the scheduling of the entire circuit.[5]

For the first season, teams' scores were determined by the total score of the top three point-earning players on them, with points being carried over if a player changes teams during the season.[6] Qualifying points are weighed more heavily towards Majors than Minors.[5] The qualifying points in every tournament awarded 50% to the champions, 30% to the runners-up, and 10% to the semi-finalists. If there was a third-place decider match held, the points were awarded 15% to the 3rd-place finishers and 5% to the 4th-place finishers.[9][10] The ranking of a team was calculated only by the accumulation of the top three players with the highest qualifying points. A team was allowed to change its roster twice in a specified time period, but would automatically lose its eligibility to obtain a direct invitation to The International if they changed its roster after the second mid-season roster period had passed.[9]

Starting with the 2018–2019 season, there were a number of adjustments to the rules, with the primary one being that both Major and Minor events are held in pairs, with qualifiers for each set to run in exclusively scheduled windows, as direct invites to them are now forbidden. In contrast with the previous season, the overall number of them decreased from 22 to 10, with the season beginning in September 2018 and concluding in June 2019. The number of direct International 2019 invites was increased from eight to twelve, with each of the six regions only given one qualifier slot.[11][12] The qualifiers for Majors will run first, and teams who fail to qualify for it will be eligible to compete in the Minor qualifiers a few days later. The winner of a Minor tournament will be granted a reserved slot in the associated Major. Valve will also remove roster locks that previously prevented teams that made changes mid-season from qualifying for points for the season. Instead, all points will be directly assigned to teams, rather than individual players. Removing a player from the roster will reduce the team's total points by 20 percent, with adding a replacement player having no penalty.[13] In addition, Valve also implemented a rule that only allows for a single team owned in an multi-team organization to compete in The International and the qualifiers leading up to them. The rule also includes cases in which individual players have financial ties to other teams.[14]

Seasons[edit]

2017–2018[edit]

Minor Major
Tournament Dates Location Organizer(s) Winner
Starladder i-League Invitational #3[15] October 11–15, 2017 Kiev Starladder European Union Team Liquid
PGL Open Bucharest[16] October 19–22, 2017 Bucharest PGL Philippines Mineski
ESL One Hamburg 2017[17] October 26–29, 2017 Hamburg ESL Russia Virtus.pro
AMD Sapphire Dota PIT League[18] November 2–5, 2017 Split One Game Agency European Union Team Liquid
Perfect World Masters[19] November 20–26, 2017 Shanghai Perfect World China Newbee
DreamLeague Season 8[20] December 1–3, 2017 Jönköping DreamHack European Union Team Secret
MDL Macau[21] December 4–10, 2017 Macau Mars Media European Union OG
Dota Summit 8[22] December 13–17, 2017 Los Angeles Beyond the Summit Russia Virtus.pro
Captains Draft 4[23] January 4–7, 2018 Washington, D.C. Moonduck European Union Team Secret
ESL One Genting 2018[24] January 23–28, 2018 Pahang ESL China Newbee
Starladder i-League Invitational #4[25] February 1–4, 2018 Shanghai Starladder European Union Team Liquid
ESL One Katowice 2018[26] February 20–25, 2018 Katowice ESL Russia Virtus.pro
The Bucharest Major[27] March 9–11, 2018 Bucharest PGL Russia Virtus.pro
GESC Indonesia Dota 2 Minor[28] March 16–18, 2018 Jakarta GESC United States Evil Geniuses
DreamLeague Season 9[29] March 21–25, 2018 Stockholm DreamHack European Union Team Secret
Dota 2 Asia Championships 2018[30] March 29 – April 7, 2018 Shanghai Perfect World Philippines Mineski
Starladder i-League Invitational #5[31] April 12–15, 2018 Kiev Starladder United States OpTic Gaming
EPICENTER XL[32] April 27 – May 7, 2018 Moscow Epic Esports Events China PSG.LGD
GESC Thailand Dota 2 Minor[33] May 11–13, 2018 Bangkok GESC United States VGJ.Storm
MDL Changsha Major[34] May 14–20, 2018 Changsha Mars Media China PSG.LGD
ESL One Birmingham 2018[35][36] May 23–27, 2018 Birmingham ESL Russia Virtus.pro
China Dota 2 Supermajor[37][38] June 2–10, 2018 Shanghai
  • Perfect World
  • PGL
European Union Team Liquid

2018–2019[edit]

Minor Major
Tournament Dates[14] Location Organizer(s) Winner
DreamLeague Season 10[39] October 29 – November 4, 2018 Stockholm DreamHack TBD
Kuala Lumpur Major[40] November 9–18, 2018 Kuala Lumpur PGL TBD
TBA January 7–13, 2019 TBA TBA TBD
TBA January 17–27, 2019 TBA TBA TBD
TBA March 4–10, 2019 TBA TBA TBD
TBA March 14–24, 2019 TBA TBA TBD
TBA April 22–28, 2019 TBA TBA TBD
TBA May 2–12, 2019 TBA TBA TBD
TBA June 10–16, 2019 TBA TBA TBD
TBA June 20–30, 2019 TBA TBA TBD

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Dota 2 - The Road to The International". Dota2.com. Retrieved April 22, 2018. 
  2. ^ "Here are all the finalized rosters for the rest of the 2017-18 Dota Pro Circuit season". The Flying Courier. Retrieved April 22, 2018. 
  3. ^ a b Savov, Vlad. "Valve is rebooting its Dota 2 tournaments for a more democratic and 'organic' approach". The Verge. Archived from the original on August 5, 2017. Retrieved July 4, 2017. 
  4. ^ Chalk, Andy. "Valve is eliminating the Dota 2 Majors for the 2017-18 season". PC Gamer. Archived from the original on July 5, 2017. Retrieved July 4, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c Gach, Ethan. "Valve Announces Big Changes To Dota 2's Tournament Structure Going Forward". Kotaku. Archived from the original on July 10, 2017. Retrieved July 4, 2017. 
  6. ^ a b "The Dota Pro Circuit". blog.dota2.com. Archived from the original on September 16, 2017. Retrieved September 15, 2017. 
  7. ^ "Dota Pro Circuit". dota2.com. Archived from the original on October 19, 2017. Retrieved November 22, 2017. 
  8. ^ "Here are the top eight Dota Pro Circuit point winners so far". The Flying Courier. Retrieved April 22, 2018. 
  9. ^ a b freaks4u.com, Freaks 4U Gaming GmbH,. "Dota Pro Circuit 2017/2018". joinDOTA.com. Retrieved April 22, 2018. 
  10. ^ "Mineski.net - Esports News and Features". Mineski.net. Retrieved April 22, 2018. 
  11. ^ Wells, Jessica. "Valve tells Dota 2 teams to stop accepting gambling sponsors". PCGamesN. Retrieved August 16, 2018. 
  12. ^ Rigon, Daniela. "Fewer tourneys, more points for Dota 2 Pro Circuit in 2019". ESPN. Retrieved 15 September 2018. 
  13. ^ Wolf, Jacob. "Valve makes big changes to the 2018/2019 Dota 2 pro circuit". ESPN. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  14. ^ a b Rose, Victoria (June 4, 2018). "Valve announces massive new changes to Dota Pro Circuit". The Flying Courier. Polygon. 
  15. ^ "Team Liquid takes first Valve Minor at Starladder i-League Season 3". The Flying Courier. Polygon. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  16. ^ Rose, Victoria. "EPICENTER XL preview: schedule, teams and format". The Flying Courier. Polygon. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  17. ^ "Dota 2: Virtus.Pro gets redemption in Hamburg". ESPN.com. Retrieved November 8, 2017. 
  18. ^ "AMD SAPPHIRE Dota PIT League schedule, teams and format". The Flying Courier. Polygon. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  19. ^ "Perfect World Masters schedule, teams and format". The Flying Courier. Polygon. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  20. ^ "ROG DreamLeague Season 8 Playoffs schedule, teams and format". The Flying Courier. Polygon. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  21. ^ "MDL Macau schedule, format and teams". The Flying Courier. Polygon. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  22. ^ "Virtus Pro pull Summit hat trick, win third time at annual event". The Flying Courier. Polygon. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  23. ^ Rose, Victoria. "Captain's Draft 4.0 schedule, format and teams". The Flying Courier. Polygon. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  24. ^ "ESL: Newbee wins big at Genting". ESPN.com. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  25. ^ "Team Liquid get back to winning ways in Starladder i-League". Sky Sports. Retrieved April 25, 2018. 
  26. ^ "Virtus Pro become two-time major champions at ESL One Katowice". Mail Online. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  27. ^ Allen, Eric Van. "Virtus Pro Look Unstoppable In Dota Bucharest Major Finals". Compete. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  28. ^ Rose, Victoria. "GESC Indonesia Dota 2 Minor schedule, format and teams". The Flying Courier. Polygon. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  29. ^ Rose, Victoria. "DreamLeague Season 9 schedule, teams and format". The Flying Courier. Polygon. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  30. ^ Allen, Eric Van. "Mineski Becomes First Southeast Asian Dota Team To Win A Major". Compete. Retrieved April 23, 2018. 
  31. ^ "OpTic Gaming Win StarLadder ImbaTV Invitational Season 5". IGN Southeast Asia. April 16, 2018. Retrieved April 24, 2018. 
  32. ^ Van Allen, Eric. "PSG.LGD Wins Its First Dota Major And Also An Infinity Gauntlet". Kotaku. Retrieved May 9, 2018. 
  33. ^ Allen, Eric Van. "The Weekend In Esports: Rocket-Powered Soccer". Compete. Retrieved April 25, 2018. 
  34. ^ Rose, Victoria. "MDL Changsha Major: schedule, teams and format". The Flying Courier. Polygon. Retrieved May 14, 2018. 
  35. ^ Phillips, Lawrence. "Virtus Pro victorious at ESL One Major in Birmingham". Sky Sports. Retrieved May 27, 2018. 
  36. ^ Monk, Victoria. "Dota 2 in Birmingham: What this means for esports in the UK". ESPN. Retrieved June 4, 2018. 
  37. ^ Cameron, Zac. "What's at stake for the Dota 2 China Supermajor". TwinGalaxies.com. Retrieved June 2, 2018. 
  38. ^ Lee, Timothy. "Team Liquid claim first major victory at China Dota 2 Supermajor". ESPN. Retrieved 12 June 2018. 
  39. ^ Div. "First Minor of the Season Announced: DreamLeague Season 10". GosuGamers. Retrieved 20 September 2018. 
  40. ^ Rose, Victoria. "Kuala Lumpur Major announced as first Dota Pro Circuit Major of 2018-19 season". The Flying Courier. Polygon. Retrieved 5 September 2018. 

External links[edit]