Franklin County, Maine

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Not to be confused with Franklin, Maine.
Franklin County, Maine
Franklin County Courthouse Farmington 5.JPG
Franklin County Courthouse
Map of Maine highlighting Franklin County
Location in the U.S. state of Maine
Map of the United States highlighting Maine
Maine's location in the U.S.
Founded May 9, 1838
Named for Benjamin Franklin
Seat Farmington
Largest town Farmington
Area
 • Total 1,743 sq mi (4,514 km2)
 • Land 1,697 sq mi (4,395 km2)
 • Water 47 sq mi (122 km2), 2.7%
Population
 • (2010) 30,768
 • Density 18/sq mi (7/km²)
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.franklincounty.maine.gov

Franklin County is a county located in the state of Maine, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 30,768,[1] making it the second-least populous county in Maine. Its county seat is Farmington.[2] The county was established on May 9, 1838 and named for Benjamin Franklin.[3]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,743 square miles (4,510 km2), of which 1,697 square miles (4,400 km2) is land and 47 square miles (120 km2) (2.7%) is water.[4]

Adjacent counties and municipalities[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 20,801
1850 20,027 −3.7%
1860 20,403 1.9%
1870 18,807 −7.8%
1880 18,180 −3.3%
1890 17,053 −6.2%
1900 18,444 8.2%
1910 19,119 3.7%
1920 19,825 3.7%
1930 19,941 0.6%
1940 19,896 −0.2%
1950 20,682 4.0%
1960 20,069 −3.0%
1970 22,444 11.8%
1980 27,098 20.7%
1990 29,008 7.0%
2000 29,467 1.6%
2010 30,768 4.4%
Est. 2015 29,991 [5] −2.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790–1960[7] 1900–1990[8]
1990–2000[9] 2010–2013[1]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 29,467 people, 11,806 households, and 7,744 families residing in the county. The population density was 17 people per square mile (7/km²). There were 19,159 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.96% White, 0.24% Black or African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 0.81% from two or more races. 0.54% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 26.3% were of English, 13.8% United States or American, 12.2% French, 9.2% Irish, 7.9% French Canadian, and 5.3% Scottish ancestry according to Census 2000. 95.7% spoke English and 2.9% French as their first language.

There were 11,806 households out of which 29.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.40% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.40% were non-families. 25.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the county the population was spread out with 23.50% under the age of 18, 11.10% from 18 to 24, 26.40% from 25 to 44, 24.80% from 45 to 64, and 14.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,459, and the median income for a family was $37,863. Males had a median income of $30,475 versus $20,442 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,796. About 10.70% of families and 14.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.90% of those under age 18 and 9.50% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 30,768 people, 13,000 households, and 8,129 families residing in the county.[11] The population density was 18.1 inhabitants per square mile (7.0/km2). There were 21,709 housing units at an average density of 12.8 per square mile (4.9/km2).[12] The racial makeup of the county was 97.3% white, 0.4% Asian, 0.4% American Indian, 0.2% black or African American, 0.2% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.0% of the population.[11] In terms of ancestry, 23.3% were English, 14.2% were Irish, 7.7% were French Canadian, 7.5% were German, 6.4% were Scottish, and 5.0% were American.[13]

Of the 13,000 households, 26.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.6% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 37.5% were non-families, and 28.9% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.76. The median age was 43.4 years.[11]

The median income for a household in the county was $39,831 and the median income for a family was $48,634. Males had a median income of $38,563 versus $30,024 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,838. About 10.2% of families and 15.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.2% of those under age 18 and 8.8% of those age 65 or over.[14]

Politics[edit]

Presidential election results[15]
Year Democrat Republican
2012 58.2% 8,659 38.7% 5,753
2008 58.9% 10,113 38.6% 6,627
2004 54.8% 9,465 42.7% 7,378
2000 49.2% 7,593 41.8% 6,459

Voter registration[edit]

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of November 2014[16]
Party Total Voters Percentage
  Unaffiliated 8,436 36.64%
  Republican 7,146 31.04%
  Democratic 6,278 27.27%
  Green 1,161 5.04%
Total 23,021 100%

Government[edit]

Franklin County is governed by a three-member county commission. Commissioners meet at 9am on the first and third Monday of each month and are elected in the November general election, serving four year terms. Currently, the three commissioners are:[17]

District One: Gary McGrane (Jay, Wilton, Temple, Carthage)

District Two: Charles Webster (Farmington, Chesterville, New Sharon)

District Three: Clyde Barker (Avon, Carrabassett Valley, Coplin Plantation, Dallas Plantation, Eustis, Industry, Kingfield, New Vineyard, Phillips, Rangeley Plantation, Rangeley, Sandy River Plantation, Strong, Weld, and unorganized territories of East Central Franklin, North Franklin, South Franklin, West Central Franklin and Wyman)

Commissioner Charles Webster was appointed by Governor Paul LePage in 2015 to serve out the rest of Fred Hardy's term, who died on July 4.[18] Webster and Barker are members of the Republican Party, while McGrane belongs to the Democratic Party.

Franklin County belongs to Maine Prosecutorial District Four, which is composed of Franklin, Oxford and Androscoggin Counties. The current district attorney is Andrew S. Robinson, of Wilton who was elected to his first term in 2014. The deputy district attorney is James A. Andrews, who was appointed to that post by Robinson in 2015.[19]

The current county treasurer is Pamela Prodan. She was elected to that position in 2014 and will serve a four term through December 2018. Prodan succeed Mary Frank, who decided to retire instead of run for a second term. The duties of county treasurer include, overseeing fiscal accounting matters, including paying bills, collecting amounts owed the County, reserve/investment accounts, maintaining the County's financial records and other matters related to the County's finances.[20]

Law Enforcement[edit]

Only three municipalities in Franklin Count have their own police department (Jay, Wilton and Farmington). The Franklin County Sheriff's Department is responsible for patrol and emergency calls in the remaining communities in the county without their own agency. The current sheriff is Scott Nichols, of New Sharon. Nichols was elected to that post in November 2012, defeating incumbent sheriff, Dennis Pike. Pike had spent 46 years in Franklin County law enforcement prior to being defeated by Nichols.[21]

The status of the Franklin County Jail has been contentiously debated issue within the county and state for several years. In 2008, Governor John Baldacci signed into law a bill which consolidated county jails in an effort to reduce costs. As a result, the Franklin County jail was designated a 72-hour holding facility. Any inmates who needed to held longer than the three-day maximum, had to be transported to the Somerset County Jail in East Madison, which county jail officials said was a waste of department time and money. Jail consolidation has also led to jail overcrowding statewide.[22] When the Somerset Jail reached its maximum capacity, inmates were forced to be transported to another jail within the state, sometimes hours away which Franklin County officials again said wasted time and money.

In 2012, Somerset County Commissioners voted not to accept any more inmates from outside the county as the state Board of Corrections withheld its third quarter payment. While the vote allowed current inmates to stay at the jail, it required all future inmates to be sent to Two Bridges Regional Jail in Wiscasset. In 2013, the Maine Legislature's Public Safety and Criminal Justice Committee voted 11-0 to allow the Franklin County jail to return to full service status.[23]

In 2014, Franklin County Commissioners voted to withhold all payments to state for jail inmates. Public outrage over the jail issue also pressured the state to give the county full service rights. An 800-member Facebook group was created and several protests in front of the county courthouse were staged in 2014 also. In 2015, the State Board of Corrections voted to grant the county a fully operational jail, officially ending the seven year conflict between the county and the state.[24]

Communities[edit]

Smalls Falls Rest Area on Route 4 just south of Rangeley, Maine

Towns[edit]

Plantations[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unorganized territories[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 19, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 131. 
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved September 7, 2014. 
  5. ^ "County Totals Dataset: Population, Population Change and Estimated Components of Population Change: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 7, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved September 7, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 7, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 7, 2014. 
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  11. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-21. 
  12. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-21. 
  13. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-21. 
  14. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-21. 
  15. ^ "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Retrieved 2011-06-11. 
  16. ^ "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of November 4, 2014" (PDF). Maine Bureau of Corporations. 
  17. ^ "franklincountyme-gov". franklincountyme-gov. Retrieved 2016-05-24. 
  18. ^ Perry, Donna M.; Journal, Sun. "LePage appoints Charlie Webster as Franklin County commissioner". The Bangor Daily News. Retrieved 2016-05-24. 
  19. ^ "franklincountyme-gov". franklincountyme-gov. Retrieved 2016-05-24. 
  20. ^ "franklincountyme-gov". franklincountyme-gov. Retrieved 2016-05-24. 
  21. ^ Schroeder, Karen (2012-12-30). "After 46 years, Franklin County Sheriff Dennis Pike hits the road". Central Maine. Retrieved 2016-05-24. 
  22. ^ "Overcrowding intensifies problems at Maine's county jails - The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram". The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram. 2015-01-19. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  23. ^ "Bill to return local jail to full service fails; Somerset County refuses Franklin County's detainees | Daily Bulldog". www.dailybulldog.com. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  24. ^ Schroeder, Kaitlin (2015-01-13). "Franklin County jail to return to full-time lockup status". Central Maine. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 44°59′N 70°26′W / 44.98°N 70.44°W / 44.98; -70.44