Global System of Trade Preferences among Developing Countries

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The Global System of Trade Preferences among Developing Countries (GSTP) is a preferential trade agreement signed on 13 April 1988 with the aim of increasing trade between developing countries in the framework of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.[1] Its entry into force was on 19 April 1989 and its notification to the WTO on 25 September 1989.

Membership[edit]

  members
  applicants
  former members

Current members states, participating since 19 April 1989, are: Bangladesh, Cuba, Ghana, India, Nigeria, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Zimbabwe

Additionally current members states are: Algeria, Argentina, Benin, Bolivia, Brazil, Cameroon, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Egypt (16-07-89), Macedonia, Guinea, Guyana (04-05-89), Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, North Korea, South Korea (11-06-89), Libya, Malaysia (31-08-89), Mexico (13-05-89), Morocco (13-07-89), Mozambique, Myanmar, Nicaragua (03-05-89), Pakistan (08-07-89), Peru (15-04-89), Philippines, Sudan, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia (25-08-89), Venezuela, Vietnam and the trade bloc of MERCOSUR (2-11-2006)[2]

Applicants[3] are: Burkina Faso, Burundi, Haiti, Madagascar, Mauritania, Rwanda, Suriname, Uganda and Uruguay.

Former members: Yugoslavia (from 19-04-1989), Romania (from 19-04-1989 until its EU membership)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]