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Business routes of Interstate 75 in Michigan

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Interstate 75 marker

Interstate 75
Highway system

There have been nine business routes for Interstate 75 in the US state of Michigan. Numbered either Business Loop Interstate 75 (BL I-75) or Business Spur Interstate 75 (BS I-75) depending if they are a full business loop or a business spur, these highways are former routings of I-75's predecessor highways in the state. They were designated as I-75 was completed through the various areas of Michigan. The business loop in Pontiac runs through that city's downtown along a section of Woodward Avenue and a segment of roadway formerly used by M-24. The former Saginaw business loop was once a part of US Highway 23 (US 23), as was most of the original Bay City business loop. The roadways that make up the business loops in West Branch and Roscommon were previously part of M-76, I-75's predecessor through that part of the state. In Northern Michigan, the Grayling and Gaylord BL I-75s were part of US 27, and the two business routes in St. Ignace and Sault Ste. Marie in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan were part of US 2. Each of the business loops connects to I-75 on both ends and runs through their respective cities' downtown areas. The two business spurs only connect to I-75 on one end and run into the appropriate downtown.

Pontiac[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 75
Location: Pontiac
Length: 8.384 mi[1] (13.493 km)
Existed: 1963[2][3]–present

Business Loop I-75 (BL I-75) is a business loop serving Pontiac and Auburn Hills. It uses portions of former Business M-24 (Bus. M-24) through town. The highway starts as a eight-lane freeway at an interchange on I-75 in Bloomfield Township. The freeway continues past an interchange with Opdyke Road to end at Square Lake Road, dropping to six lanes. BL I-75 continues to M-1 at Woodward Avenue. Square Lake Road continues to the west as Bus. US 24, BL I-75 turns northwesterly along the eight-lane divided Woodward Avenue, running concurrently with Bus. US 24 into downtown Pontiac. At the south side of downtown, Woodward drops to six lanes the two directions of Woodward Avenue split and form a four-lane loop. The Woodward Avenue Loop encircles downtown Pontiac, and it is crossed by the eastbound direction of M-59 running on Huron Street. One block north, the westbound direction of M-59 runs along University Drive and turns to follow BL I-75/Bus. US 24 (Woodward Avenue Loop). The loop intersects Perry Street another block further north, and BL I-75 turns northeasterly onto the two-way Perry Street. BL I-75 passes through residential areas and a minor business area along the four-lane Perry Street. Outside of the downtown area, Perry Street widens to include a center turn lane. North of Walton Boulevard in Auburn Hills, the street name changes to Lapeer Road. BL I-75 intersects Opdyke Road a couple hundred feet west of I-75 before crossing the freeway. Lapeer Road continues as a six-lane, divided roadway to the ramps of a double trumpet interchange, where the BL I-75 designation ends. The roadway however, continues as M-24 providing access to the Palace of Auburn Hills.[4][5] On average each day in 2013, 9,829 vehicles use the business loop between the two M-59 junctions, and 73,795 vehicles do so on the freeway stub east of Opdyke Road, the lowest and highest traffic counts.[6]

In 1919 when the state highway system was first numbered,[7] the main north–south highway through Pontiac was numbered M-10,[8] and it was renumbered to US 10 seven years later when the United States Numbered Highway System was created.[9] By the next year, M-24 was designated from downtown Pontiac northward to Lapeer.[10] M-24 was moved to an eastern bypass of town in 1936, and the former routing in town became M-24A.[11][12] This was redesignated Bus M-24 in 1940.[13][14]

A number of highway designation and routing changes in the Pontiac were made when US 10 was shifted out of downtown to replace M-58 along Telegraph Road west of downtown by the middle of 1961. Before the change, US 10 followed Dixie Highway and Oakland Avenue southeast into Pontiac to Perry Street and then Perry to Woodward while M-58 was routed along Telegraph and Square Lake roads. After the change, US 10 turned south from Dixie Highway onto Telegraph and then east onto Square Lake to connect back to Woodward. The old route through downtown was assigned the Bus. US 10 moniker and M-58 was decommissioned as a highway designation.[15][16] Two years later, I-75 was completed to the east of Pontiac, and the M-24 bypass of the city was turned over to local control. The former Bus. M-24 through downtown was renumbered BL I-75 along with a connection along Square Lake Road out to the freeway.[2][3] The next year, the streets downtown Pontiac were reconfigured and a loop called Wide Track Drive was created to route traffic around the downtown area. The former routing of BL I-75 on Perry Street in the downtown core was replaced by routing the business loops on Wide Track Drive.[3][17] Then in 1966, an interchange was built to replace the intersection at Opdyke Road and Square Lake Road.[18][19]

In 1985, the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) received permission from the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials to truncate US 10 to Bay City,[20] and when the change was made the following year, US 24 replaced US 10 on Telegraph Road north of Square Lake Road, and Bus. US 10 through downtown was redesignated Bus. US 24, including the segment concurrent with BL I-75.[21][22] Wide Track Drive through downtown was renamed as the Woodward Avenue Loop in 2000.[23][24]

The section of BL I-75 that follows Woodward Avenue has a pair of special designations attached to it. In 1999, it was designated by MDOT as what is now called a Pure Michigan Byway.[25] Three years later, it was named a National Scenic Byway by the Federal Highway Administration National Scenic Byways Program on June 13, 2002,[26] the only urban road at the time with that classification.[27] It was later upgraded to All-American Road status on October 16, 2009.[28]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in Oakland County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Bloomfield Township 0.000 0.000 I-75 – Flint, Detroit Exit 75 on I-75
Bloomfield TownshipPontiac city line 1.304 2.099 Opdyke Road
Square Lake Road
Interchange; western end of freeway stub
Bloomfield Township 2.142 3.447
Bus. US 24 south
M-1 south (Woodward Avenue) – Detroit
Southern end of Bus. US 24 concurrency; northern terminus of M-1
Pontiac 2.424 3.901 Southern end of one-way Woodward Avenue Loop
3.103 4.994 M-59 west (Huron Street) Westbound direction of M-59
3.183 5.123 M-59 east (University Drive) Southern end of M-59 eastbound concurrency around Woodward Avenue Loop
3.374 5.430
Bus. US 24 north / M-59 east (Woodward Avenue Loop) – Clarkston, Howell
Northern end of Bus. US 24/M-59 east concurrency; BL I-75 exits the Woodard Avenue Loop
Auburn Hills 7.892–
7.903
12.701–
12.719
M-24 north – Lake Orion Southern terminus of M-24
8.362–
8.384
13.457–
13.493
I-75 – Flint, Detroit Exit 81 on I-75
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Saginaw[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 75
Location: Saginaw
Length: 7.338 mi[1] (11.809 km)
Existed: 1961[31][32]–1971[29][30]

Business Loop I-75 (BL I-75) was a business loop in Saginaw that was previously Business US Highway 23 (Bus. US 23). It started at an interchange between I-75/US 23 and M-46 (Holland Road) in Buena Vista Township. From there, it ran concurrently with M-46 westward into Saginaw. East of 17th Street, the highway split to form a one-way pairing with Remington Street, which carried westbound traffic. About three blocks further west, BL I-75 split from M-46 to follow Genesee Street northwesterly into the downtown area. At an intersection between Genesee Street, James Street and 2nd Avenue, the northbound BL I-75 followed 2nd Avenue while southbound continued on Genesee Street. Northbound traffic traveled along 2nd Avenue and Johnson Street to Washington Avenue near the Saginaw River, where the two directions of traffic reunited. Washington Avenue also carried M-13/M-81, and the three designations ran concurrently together northward and parallel to the river. BL I-75/M-13/M-81 curved northeasterly north of downtown, and M-81 left the business loop at an intersection with Veterans Memorial Parkway; BL I-75/M-13 turned north on the parkway and M-81 continued easterly on Washington Avenue. The business loop proceeded northward running parallel to the river and ended at an interchange with I-75/US 23 in Zilwaukee Township; M-13 continued along Bay City Road north of the interchange.[29]

When the state highway system was signposted in 1919,[7] the north–south highway through Saginaw was part of the original M-10.[8] This highway was later redesignated as part of US 23 when the United States Numbered Highway System was created in 1926.[9] US 23 was initially routed on the western side of the Saginaw River through the city, but it was moved in 1929 to run along the eastern side.[33][34] In 1953, the initial eastern bypass of Saginaw was built as a two-lane highway, and the former routing through downtown was redesignated Bus. US 23.[35][36] This bypass was upgraded in 1961 to a full freeway as part of I-75/US 23, and the business loop through downtown was redesignated BL I-75.[31][32] In 1971, I-675 was completed, and BL I-75 was decommissioned through Saginaw. The segments of the business loop that were concurrent with M-13, M-46 or M-81 remained part of those state highways, but the rest of BL I-75 was returned to local control.[29][30]

Major intersections
The entire highway was in Saginaw County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Buena Vista Township 0.000 0.000 I-75 / US 23 – Mackinac Bridge, Flint
M-46 east (East Holland Road) – Richville
Eastern end of M-46 concurrency
Saginaw 1.615 2.599 M-46 west (Remington Street) – Muskegon Western end of M-46 concurrency
3.116 5.015 M-13 south (Washington Avenue) / M-81 west Southern end of M-13/M-81 concurrency
5.309–
5.354
8.544–
8.616
M-81 east (Washington Avenue) – Caro Northern end of M-81 concurrency
Zilwaukee Township 7.356–
7.338
11.838–
11.809
I-75 / US 23 – Mackinac Bridge, Flint
M-13 north (Bay City Road) – Bay City
Northern end of M-13 concurrency
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Bay City[edit]

Business Spur Interstate 75
Location: Bay City
Length: 3.047 mi[1] (4.904 km)
Existed: 1961[37][38]–present

Business Spur Interstate 75(BS I-75) is a business spur running through Bay City following a section of the current routing of M-25 through town. Formerly a full business loop numbered Business Loop Interstate 75 (BL I-75), it followed what is now M-84 back to end at I-75/US 23 at exit 160 south of downtown. The business route also follows streets that previously were numbered Business US Highway 23 (Bus. US 23). The spur starts at exit 162 on I-75/US 23 at the same interchange where M-25 and US 10 end. BS I-75 runs concurrently along M-25, and for about the first 1 13 miles (2.1 km), the spur is a four-lane freeway bounded by residential subdivisions on either side. In Bangor Township, the freeway ends and BS I-75/M-25 splits into a one-way pairing of Thomas Street (eastbound) and Jenny Street (westbound). These two three-lane streets continue along a residential area on the west side of Bay City. East of intersections with Henry Street, the opposing sides of traffic merge back together near Veterans Memorial Park to cross the Saginaw River on the four-lane Veterans Memorial Bridge. On the eastern side of the river, BS I-75/M-25 splits again into the one-way pairing of the three-lane McKinley Street (westbound) and 7th Street (eastbound). Just three blocks east of the river, BS I-75 ends at the intersections with M-84 (Washington Avenue) in downtown Bay City.[39][40] On average each day in 2013, 11,678 vehicles use the business loop east of the M-13 junction, and 29,391 vehicles do so west of the M-84 junction, the lowest and highest traffic counts.[6]

When the state highway system was first signposted in 1919,[7] the north–south highway through Bay City was part of the original M-10, and the east–west highway was numbered as part of M-20.[8] When the United States Numbered Highway System was created in 1926, M-10 became part of US 23, although it was routed on the western side of the Saginaw River. The highway was rerouted to the eastern side of the river in 1929.[33][34] By early 1941, US 23 was rerouted to cross the Saginaw River on the southern side of Bay City, and the former routing along Washington Avenue and Midland Street through downtown was renumbered Bus. US 23.[41][42] When the I-75/US 10/US 23 freeway bypass west of Bay City opened in late 1961, the former routing of US 23 was replaced by M-13 and the former Bus. US 23, including connections along the former routing of M-47 southwest and M-20 west of Bay City, were redesignated as BL I-75.[37][38] The BL I-75 designation lasted until 1971 when southern half of BL I-75 was removed, converting the business loop into a business spur; the southern section was renumbered as part of an M-84 extension, and BS I-75 would then run along the section concurrent with M-25 only.[43][43]

Major Intersections
The entire highway is in Bay County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Monitor Township 0.000–
0.014
0.000–
0.023
I-75 / US 23 – Mackinac Bridge, Saginaw
US 10 west – Midland
M-25 east – Bay City
Western end of M-25 concurrency; exit 162 on I-75/US 25; eastern terminus of US 10
Bangor Township 1.306 2.102 Eastern end of freeway
Bay City 1.690 2.720 M-13 / LHCT north (Euclid Avenue) – Standish, Saginaw Western end of LHCT concurrency
2.589 4.167 John F. Kennedy Drive Westbound exit only
3.047 4.904 M-25 east / LHCT east
M-84 south (Washington Avenue) – Saginaw
Eastern end of M-25/LHCT concurrency
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

West Branch[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 75
Location: West Branch
Existed: 1973[44][45]–present

Business Loop Interstate 75(BL I-75) is a business loop running through West Branch that was originally numbered Business M-76 (Bus. M-76). It starts at exit 212 south on I-75 south of West Branch. From that interchange, BL I-75 runs northward along Cooks Road in Horton and West Branch townships past an outlet mall. North of the mall, the roadway has two lanes, one in each direction plus an intermittent center turn lane, and it curves first to the northeast through a rural section of the townships, and then after intersecting Old 76 Road, it turns northwesterly through a commercial area. On the eastern city limits, BL I-75 turns due west and runs concurrently with M-55 on the four-lane Houghton Avenue through downtown West Branch. On the western side of downtown, the business loop intersects the northern end of M-30 and narrows to two lanes. BL I-75/M-55 continues out of town, running past more businesses before meeting I-75 at exit  215. At that interchange, BL I-75 ends, and M-55 merges onto the freeway.[46][47] On average each day in 2013, 10,682 vehicles use the business loop near the southern I-75 interchange, and 15,399 vehicles do so between the M-55 junction and 5th Street in downtown West Branch, the lowest and highest traffic counts.[6]

When the state highway system was signposted in 1919,[7] the highway running northwest–southeast through West Branch was numbered M-76 and the east–west highway was M-55.[8] In the early 1970s, M-76 was being converted into a freeway between Standish and the Grayling area. In 1970, the freeway was built as far as the present-day exit 212, and the connection along Cook Road was built to allow M-76 to connect between the new freeway and its former routing.[48][49] The next year, this freeway was completed to bypass West Branch to the south and west. The former route of M-76 through town with the connection along Cook Road was renumbered Bus. M-76.[49][50] Two years later, I-75 was finished in the state,[51] and the M-76 designation was decommissioned. The former Bus. M-76 was redesignated as BL I-75 at the same time.[44][45]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in Ogemaw County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Horton Township 0.000 0.000 I-75 – Mackinac Bridge
Cook Road
Roadway continues southward as Cook Road
West Branch Township 1.552 2.498 Old 76 Formerly M-76
2.495 4.015 M-55 east – Tawas City Eastern end of M-55 concurrency
West Branch 3.593 5.782 M-30 south – Beaverton Northern terminus of M-30
Ogemaw Township 5.525 8.892 I-75 / M-55 west – Mackinac Bridge, Saginaw, Houghton Lake Western end of M-55 concurrency
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Roscommon[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 75
Location: Roscommon
Length: 6.935 mi[1] (11.161 km)
Existed: 1973[44][45]–present

Business Loop Interstate 75 (BL I-75) is a business loop running through Roscommon. Starting at exit 239 along I-75, the business loop runs concurrently with M-18 northward along the two-lane Roscommon Road through rural Northern Michigan woodlands. When BL I-75/M-18 enters the village of Roscommon, it follows Lake Street northeasterly into downtown. At the intersection with 5th Street, BL I-75 turns northwesterly and separates from M-18. In the village, the business loop has three lanes, one in each direction with a center turn lane. The business loop continues past several businesses and exits the village as a two-lane road. BL I-75 curves to run due west along the RoscommonCrawford county line on Federal Highway. At exit 244 on I-75, the business loop terminates while following the county line.[52][53] On average each day in 2013, 1,531 vehicles use the business loop near the northern I-75 interchange, and 5,987 vehicles do so in downtown Roscommon south of the M-18 junction, the lowest and highest traffic counts.[6]

When the state highway system was originally signposted in 1919,[7] the highway running northwest–southeast through Roscommon was numbered M-76.[8] In 1949, M-18 was extended north into Roscommon and then west along M-76.[54][55] During the early 1970s, M-76 was being converted into a freeway to be used as part of I-75. In 1971, I-75 was completed southward from the Grayling area to what is now exit 239. Two years later, I-75 was completed between Roscommon and West Branch,[51] and M-76 between the two communities was decommissioned. At the same time, M-18 was realigned to northeasterly out of Roscommon instead of following M-76 toward Grayling. BL I-75 was commissioned at this time to overlap M-18 from the freeway north into Roscommon and to replace the former M-18/M-76 west of the village to the new freeway.[44][45]

Major intersections

County Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Roscommon Higgins Township 0.000 0.000 I-75 – Mackinac Bridge, Saginaw
M-18 south – Houghton Lake
Southern end of M-18 concurrency; exit 239 on I-75
Roscommon 3.026 4.870 M-18 north Northern end of M-18 concurrency
RoscommonCrawford county line GerrishBeaver Creek township line 6.935 11.161 I-75 – Mackinac Bridge, Saginaw Exit 244 on I-75
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Grayling[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 75
Location: Grayling
Length: 5.823 mi[1] (9.371 km)
Existed: 1961[31][32]–present

Business Loop Interstate 75 (BL I-75) is a business loop running through Grayling. The southern end is at a partial interchange at exit 254 on I-75; only northbound I-75 traffic can access northbound BL I-75, and southbound BL I-75 traffic can only access southbound I-75. From this interchange, the business loop runs northward as a five-lane divided roadway through a commercial area and past the Grayling Golf Club. At the intersection with Huron Street (South Down River Road), BL I-75 merges with M-72. The two highways run concurrently and turn northwesterly along the five-lane undivided James Street. BL I-75/M-72 narrows to three lanes and crosses the Au Sable River and runs for about 34 mile (1.2 km) before intersecting Lake Street in downtown Grayling. There, M-72 turns southwesterly onto Lake Street, separating from the business loop. At the same intersection, M-93 turns north and merges with BL I-75 as the two run concurrently on the three-lane McClellan Street. BL I-75/M-93 intersects F-32 (North Down River Road) and then passes the Camp Grayling Airfield. North of the airfield, the highway narrows to two lanes and curves to the northwest, exiting the city. At the intersection with Old 27 and Hartwick Pines Road, BL I-75/M-93 turns northeasterly onto the latter. They continue running concurrently to exit 259 on I-75 where the BL I-75 designation terminates. M-93 continues along Hartwick Pines Road north of the interchange.[56][57] All of BL I-75 through Grayling is a part of the Strategic Highway Network, a component of the National Highway System,[58] a network of roads important to the country's economy, defense, and mobility.[59] On average each day in 2013, 1,407 vehicles use the business loop between Old 27 and I-75, and 18,467 vehicles do so in downtown Grayling south of the M-72 junction, the lowest and highest traffic counts.[6]

When the state highway system was originally signposted in 1919,[7] the north–south highway through Grayling was part of the original M-14. At that time, M-93 was only a spur from downtown Grayling to the future Camp Grayling.[8] It was later redesignated as part of US Highway 27 (US 27) in 1926.[9] By 1932, M-93 was extended northward through Grayling to the state park.[60] In 1940, M-72 was extended through the Grayling area.[13][41] I-75 in the Grayling area opened in 1961 and, the former routing of US 27 through Grayling northward to Hartwick Pines Road back to I-75 was redesignated BL I-75.[31][32]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in Crawford County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Grayling Township 0.000 0.000 I-75 south – Saginaw Southbound exit and northbound entrance only; exit 254 on I-75
Grayling 0.677 1.090 M-72 east (Huron Street) – Mio Southern end of M-72 concurrency
1.387 2.232 M-72 west / M-93 south (Lake Street) – Traverse City Northern end of M-72 concurrency; southern end of M-93 concurrency
1.842 2.964 F-32 east (North Down River Road) Western terminus of F-32
Grayling Township 5.823 9.371 I-75
M-93 north – Hartwick Pines State Park
Northern end of M-93 concurrency; exit 259 on I-75; roadway continues as M-93
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Gaylord[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 75
Location: Gaylord
Length: 3.391 mi[1] (5.457 km)
Existed: 1986[61][62]–present

Business Loop Interstate 75, or BL I-75 is a business loop running through Gaylord. The loop starts at exit 279 on I-75 in Bagley Township south of Gaylord. The highway follows the five-lane Otsego Avenue northward from the freeway into the city and though a commercial area. Otsego Avenue jogs eastward slightly south of 2nd Street, and then intersects M-32 (Main Street) in downtown Gaylord. BL I-75 turns west onto the five-lane Main Street and runs concurrently with M-32 through downtown. About five blocks each of that turn, BL I-75/M-32 meets I-75 at exit 282; BL I-75 ends while M-32 continues westward.[63][64] On average each day in 2013, 8,289 vehicles use the business loop south of the M-32 junction, and 23,436 vehicles do so in downtown Gaylord along the M-32 concurrency, the lowest and highest traffic counts.[6]

When the state highway system was first signposted in 1919,[7] the main highway running north–south through Gaylord was part of the original M-14.[8] This was renumbered as part of US Highway 27 (US 27) in 1926 after the United States Numbered Highway System was formed.[9] I-75 was completed and US 27 was removed through the Gaylord area in 1961.[65] The business loop was not created at that time, however.[31][32] Instead, it was created in 1986.[61][62]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in Otsego County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
Bagley Township 0.000 0.000 I-75 – Mackinac Bridge, Saginaw
Old 27 south
Exit 279 on I-75; roadway continues south as Old 27
Gaylord 2.868 4.616 M-32 east – Alpena Eastern end of M-32 concurrency
3.391 5.457 I-75 – Mackinac Bridge, Saginaw
M-32 west – East Jordan
Western end of M-32 concurrency; exit 382 on I-75
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

St. Ignace[edit]

Business Loop Interstate 75
Location: St. Ignace
Length: 4.719 mi[1] (7.594 km)
Existed: 1960[31][66]–present

Business Loop Interstate 75 (BL I-75) is a business loop running through St. Ignace. The loop starts at exit 344 on I-75 as the continuation of US Highway 2 (US 2) into downtown. The highway carries the Lake Huron Circle Tour (LHCT). It runs along a four-lane roadway on the north side of Straits State Park and curves northward into downtown St. Ignace along State Street. BL I-75 and three lanes and runs along the lakefront past the marina and docks for Mackinac Island ferry services. It widens back to four lanes to follow the curve of East Moran Bay and then turns inland past several hotels situated on a point jutting into the bay. North of the point, BL I-75 follows the Lake Huron shoreline past the Mackinac County Airport. North of the airport, the adjacent properties are primarily residential with a few tourist-oriented businesses. The business loop intersects County Road H-63 (Mackinac Trail) and comes to an end near Castle Rock at exit 348 on I-75 in St. Ignace Township.[67][68] On average each day in 2013, 4,327 vehicles use the business loop near the northern I-75 interchange, and 8,819 vehicles do so near the southern I-75 interchange, the lowest and highest traffic counts.[6]

The first state highway through St. Ignace was an extension of US 31 that was added by the end of 1927.[10] In 1936, US 2 was realigned to run into downtown St. Ignace from the west and replaced US 31 through town.[11][12] The business loop was commissioned in 1960 when the I-75/US 2 freeway opened, and the former route of US 2 through downtown was renumbered BL I-75.[31][66]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in Mackinac County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
St. Ignace 0.000 0.000 I-75 / GLCT – Sault Ste. Marie
US 2 west / LMCT – Escanaba, Manistique
Southern end of LHCT concurrency; eastern terminus of US 2; exit 344 on I-74
0.460 0.740 Ferry Lane Former M-122
St. Ignace Township 4.396 7.075 H-63 north (Mackinac Trail) – Sault Ste. Marie Southern terminus of H-63
4.719 7.594 I-75 / LHCT north – Sault Ste. Marie, Mackinac Bridge Northern end of LHCT concurrency; exit 348 on I-75
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Sault Ste. Marie[edit]

Business Spur Interstate 75
Location: Sault Ste. Marie
Length: 5.867 mi[1] (9.442 km)
Existed: 1962[2][32]–present

Business Spur Interstate 75 (BS I-75) is a business spur running through Sault Ste. Marie. It starts at exit 392 on I-75 on the south side of the city. From that interchange, it runs eastward along the five-lane-wide 3 Mile Road and intersects the northern end of County Road H-63 (Mackinac Trail) before curving northeasterly. The spur runs through commercial areas and intersects the northern end of M-129 (Dixie Highway) before turning due north along Ashmun Street near the Sault Ste. Marie Municipal Airport. Ashmun Street narrows to four lanes north of 10th Avenue and regains a center turn lane at Adams Avenue. BS I-75 turns northeasterly onto the two-lane Easterday Avenue and runs to the east of the campus of Lake Superior State University, crossing the Edison Sault Power Canal. At Portage Avenue south of the Soo Locks., BS I-75 turns southeasterly to follow Portage Avenue along the St. Marys River. The spur crosses the canal just upstream from its mouth. Portage Avenue continues through residential neighborhoods on the east side of Sault Ste. Marie, following the river. BS I-75 ends at the entrance to the Sugar Island Ferry Dock across from the Sault Ste. Marie Country Club.[69][70] On average each day in 2013, 1,433 vehicles use the business loop near the I-75 interchange, and 19,962 vehicles do so north of the M-129 junction, the lowest and highest traffic counts.[6]

When the state highway system was first signposted in 1919,[7] the north–south state highway in Sault Ste. Marie was numbered M-12 in 1919.[71] It was renumbered as part of US Highway 2 in 1926.[9] In 1962, the I-75/US 2 freeway was completed, and the former route of US 2 through downtown along with a connection between I-75/US 2 and the International Bridge was redesignated BS I-75.[2][32] In 1989, the designation was extended along Portage Avenue to the Sugar Island Ferry Dock.[72][73]

Major intersections
The entire highway is in Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County.

mi[1] km Destinations Notes
0.000 0.000 I-75 north / GLCT – Bridge to Canada, Mackinac Bridge Western end of LHCT concurrency; exit 392 on I-75
0.620 0.998 H-63 south (Mackinac Trail) Northern terminus of H-63
1.885 3.034 M-129 south / LHCT south Eastern end of LHCT concurrency; northern terminus of M-129
5.867 9.442 Sugar Island Ferry Dock
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Michigan Department of Transportation & Michigan Center for Shared Solutions and Technology Partnerships (2009). MDOT Physical Reference Finder Application (Map). Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 10, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d Michigan State Highway Department (1963). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ C10, L13. 
  3. ^ a b c Michigan State Highway Department (1964). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § L13. OCLC 81213707. 
  4. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈2.5 mi / 1 cm≈1.75 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Detroit Area inset. §§ A8–B9. OCLC 900162490. 
  5. ^ Google (May 10, 2015). "Overview Map of BL I-75 in Pontiac" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 10, 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h Bureau of Transportation Planning (2008). "Traffic Monitoring Information System". Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 12, 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h "Michigan May Do Well Following Wisconsin's Road Marking System". The Grand Rapids Press. September 20, 1919. p. 10. OCLC 9975013. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1919). State of Michigan: Lower Peninsula (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. OCLC 15607244. 
  9. ^ a b c d e Bureau of Public Roads & American Association of State Highway Officials (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways Adopted for Uniform Marking by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). 1:7,000,000. Washington, DC: U.S. Geological Survey. OCLC 32889555. Retrieved November 7, 2013 – via University of North Texas Libraries. 
  10. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (December 1, 1927). Official Highway Service Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. OCLC 79754957. 
  11. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (June 1, 1936). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ D12, L13. 
  12. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (December 15, 1936). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map) (Winter ed.). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ D12, L13. OCLC 317396365. 
  13. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (July 15, 1940). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map) (Summer ed.). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ G10, L13. 
  14. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (December 1, 1940). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map) (Winter ed.). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ G10, L13. 
  15. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1960). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Pontiac inset. OCLC 81552576.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1960)
  16. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1961). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Detroit Metropolitan Area inset. §§ A5–B6. OCLC 51857665.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1961)
  17. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1965). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § L13. 
  18. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1966). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. § L13. 
  19. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1967). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. § L13. 
  20. ^ Special Committee on U.S. Route Numbering (October 11, 1985). "Route Numbering Committee Agenda" (PDF) (Report). Seattle, WA: American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. Retrieved April 6, 2015 – via Wikimedia Commons. 
  21. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1986). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈2.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Detroit and Vicinity inset. §§ A6–B7. 
  22. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1987). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈2.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Detroit and Vicinity inset. §§ A6–B7. 
  23. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2000). Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈2.5 mi / 1 cm≈1.75 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Detroit and Vicinity inset. §§ A9–B9. OCLC 62107754. 
  24. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2001). Official Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈2.5 mi / 1 cm≈1.75 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Detroit and Vicinity inset. §§ A9–B9. 
  25. ^ Ballou, Brian (August 4, 1999). "Woodward Winner Storied Avenue Labeled a Michigan Heritage Road: Plans In Works For Continuous Identity From Detroit To Pontiac". Detroit Free Press. p. B1. ISSN 1055-2758. Retrieved July 14, 2012. (subscription required (help)). 
  26. ^ Dietderich, Andrew (April 19, 2004). "Woodward Group To Add Members South of Eight Mile". Crain's Detroit Business (Detroit: Crain Communications). Retrieved July 15, 2012. (subscription required (help)). 
  27. ^ Staff (Winter 2003). "Woodward Avenue: A Road to the Heart and Soul of America" (PDF). MDOT Today (Michigan Department of Transportation): 8–9. Archived from the original on August 21, 2012. Retrieved August 30, 2009. 
  28. ^ Tamboer, Andrea (October 28, 2009). "Woodward Avenue (M-1) Gets All-American Road Designation". Detroit: Booth Newspapers. Archived from the original on July 24, 2012. Retrieved July 14, 2012. 
  29. ^ a b c Michigan Department of State Highways (1971). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈3 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. Saginaw inset. OCLC 77960415. 
  30. ^ a b Michigan Department of State Highways (1972). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈3 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. Saginaw inset. 
  31. ^ a b c d e f g Michigan State Highway Department (1961). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ D10, F10, G10, J12. OCLC 51857665.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1961)
  32. ^ a b c d e f g Michigan State Highway Department (1962). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ C10, D10, F10, G10, J12. OCLC 173191490. 
  33. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (May 1, 1929). Official Highway Service Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. 
  34. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department & H.M. Gousha (January 1, 1930). Official Highway Service Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. 
  35. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (April 15, 1953). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Saginaw inset. 
  36. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (October 1, 1953). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Saginaw inset. 
  37. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1960). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Bay City inset. OCLC 81552576.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1960)
  38. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1961). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Bay City inset. OCLC 51857665.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1961)
  39. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3.5 mi / 1 cm≈2 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Bay City inset. OCLC 900162490. 
  40. ^ Google (May 11, 2015). "Overview Map of BS I-75 in Bay City" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 11, 2015. 
  41. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (2015). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3.5 mi / 1 cm≈2 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Bay City inset. 
  42. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (March 21, 1941). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map) (Spring ed.). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. Bay City inset. 
  43. ^ a b Michigan Department of State Highways (1971). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈3 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. Bay City inset. OCLC 77960415. 
  44. ^ a b c d Michigan Department of State Highways (1973). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. §§ G10, H11. OCLC 81679137. 
  45. ^ a b c d Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation (1974). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation. §§ G10, H11. OCLC 83138602. 
  46. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈15 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § H11. OCLC 900162490. 
  47. ^ Google (May 11, 2015). "Overview Map of BL I-75 in West Branch" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 11, 2015. 
  48. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1970). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. § H11. 
  49. ^ a b Michigan Department of State Highways (1971). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. § H11. OCLC 77960415. 
  50. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1972). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi. Lansing: Michigan Department of State Highways. § H11. 
  51. ^ a b "Around the State: West Branch". Traverse City Record-Eagle. United Press International. November 2, 1973. p. 3. OCLC 30098364. Retrieved March 23, 2013 – via NewspaperArchive.com. 
  52. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈15 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § H10. OCLC 900162490. 
  53. ^ Google (May 11, 2015). "Overview Map of BL I-75 in Roscommon" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 11, 2015. 
  54. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (April 15, 1949). Michigan Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ G10–H10. 
  55. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1949). Michigan Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. §§ G10–H10. 
  56. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈15 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § G10. OCLC 900162490. 
  57. ^ Google (May 10, 2015). "Overview Map of BL I-75 in Grayling" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 10, 2015. 
  58. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (April 23, 2006). National Highway System, Michigan (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 6, 2014. Retrieved October 7, 2008. 
  59. ^ Natzke, Stefan; Neathery, Mike & Adderly, Kevin (June 20, 2012). "What is the National Highway System?". National Highway System. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved July 1, 2012. 
  60. ^ Michigan State Highway Department & Rand McNally (October 1, 1932). Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. 
  61. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (1986). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § F10. 
  62. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (1987). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § F10. 
  63. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈15 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § F10. OCLC 900162490. 
  64. ^ Google (May 10, 2015). title= Overview Map of BL I-75 in Gaylord "Business routes of Interstate 75 in Michigan" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 10, 2015. 
  65. ^ "Bypasses Gaylord". The Herald-Press (St. Joseph, MI). Associated Press. September 1, 1962. p. 2. OCLC 10117184. Retrieved March 23, 2013 – via NewspaperArchive.com. 
  66. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1960). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. § D10. OCLC 81552576.  (Includes all changes through July 1, 1960)
  67. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈15 mi / 1 cm≈9 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § D10. OCLC 900162490. 
  68. ^ Google (May 10, 2015). "Overview Map of BL I-75 in St. Ignace" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 10, 2015. 
  69. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2014). Pure Michigan: State Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈3.5 mi / 1 cm≈2 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. Sault Ste. Marie inset. OCLC 900162490. 
  70. ^ Google (May 10, 2015). "Overview Map of BS I-75 in Sault Ste. Marie" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved May 10, 2015. 
  71. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1919). State of Michigan: Upper Peninsula (Map). Scale not given. Lansing: Michigan State Highway Department. OCLC 15607244. 
  72. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1989). Michigan Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. 
  73. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1990). Michigan Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in≈14.5 mi / 1 in≈23 km. Lansing: Michigan Department of Transportation. § C11. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing