Lindsey Jacobellis

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Lindsey Jacobellis
Lindsey Jacobellis.jpg
Jacobellis in 2010
Personal information
Full nameLindsey Jacobellis
Born (1985-08-19) August 19, 1985 (age 33)
Danbury, Connecticut, U.S.
ResidenceStratton Mountain, Vermont, U.S.
Height170 cm (5 ft 7 in)
Weight64 kg (141 lb)
Sport
Country United States
SportSnowboarding
Event(s)Snowboard cross, halfpipe
Coached byPeter Foley
Achievements and titles
World finalsGold medal with cup.svg Gold medal at the 2005 World Championships in Whistler
Gold medal with cup.svg Gold medal at the 2007 World Championships in Arosa
Gold medal with cup.svg Gold medal at the 2011 World Championships in La Molina
Gold medal with cup.svg Gold Medal at the 2015 World Championships in Kreischberg
Gold medal with cup.svg Gold Medal at the 2017 World Championships in Sierra Nevada
Olympic finalsSilver medal with cup.svg Silver medal at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin
Highest world ranking1st in Snowboard Cross World Cup (2007, 2009)

Lindsey Jacobellis (born August 19, 1985 in Danbury, Connecticut) is an American snowboarder from Stratton, Vermont.

At the 2006 Winter Olympics, Jacobellis won the silver medal in Women's Snowboard Cross's Olympics debut. She is also a ten-time snowboard cross champion at the X Games.

Sports career[edit]

Jacobellis has snowboarded competitively in Snowboardcross, Snowboard Slopestyle, and Snowboard Halfpipe competitions.[1]

Pre-Olympics[edit]

At the 2003 Winter X Games, Jacobellis won bronze in slopestyle.[1]

2006 Olympics[edit]

During the gold medal final of the Snowboard Cross at the 2006 Winter Olympics on February 17, 2006, Jacobellis was approaching the end of the course with a 43-meter (140 ft), three-second lead over Tanja Frieden of Switzerland. On the second to last jump Jacobellis attempted a method grab, landed on the edge of her snowboard, and fell.[2] Frieden passed her to win the gold; Jacobellis recovered and settled for silver. In televised interviews, Jacobellis initially said the grab was meant to maintain stability, but later said that "I was having fun. Snowboarding is fun; and I wanted to share my enthusiasm with the crowd".[3][4]

Post-Olympics[edit]

At the 2007 Winter X Games, Jacobellis lost the lead in a fall near the finish line in snowboardcross.

She dropped halfpipe from her competition schedule in 2008, due to increasing injuries.[1] Jacobellis regained the gold medal in snowboardcross at Winter X Games XII in 2008.

2010 Olympics[edit]

Jacobellis failed to progress to the medal round of Snowboard Cross at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, as, early in her semifinal race, she landed badly during a jump, and to avoid a collision with another rider went through a gate, resulting in an automatic disqualification. She then slid off the course. She ended up 5th in the standings.[5]

Post-Olympics[edit]

In 2011, Jacobellis won her fourth straight gold in snowboardcross at the Winter X Games, adding to her gold medals in 2008, 2009 and 2010.[6]

2014 Olympics[edit]

Jacobellis failed to progress to the medal round of Snowboard Cross at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. She was leading the semi final race when she crashed. She finished in 7th place in the overall standings.[7]

Post-Olympics[edit]

At the 2015 World Championship, Jacobellis won gold in the Snowboard Cross. She also won the 2017 World Championship and finished with a silver and two golds in the first World Cup races of the 2017-2018 season.

The New York Times reported that in the period between the 2014 and 2018 Olympics, in addition to her training, surfing and other competition strategies, Jacobellis also began working with the mental skills coach Denise Shull.[8]

2018 Olympics[edit]

Jacobellis made it to the final of the snowboard cross at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang County, South Korea and was leading most of the way, but ended up in 4th place by just .003 seconds and off the podium yet again.[9]

Television[edit]

The Challenge: Champs Vs. Pros[edit]

Jacobellis appeared on a charity edition of MTVs The Challenge, titled The Challenge: Champs vs. Pros. She competed to raise money for the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. She finished as the runner-up with her teammate in the final challenge, Kamerion Wimbley.[10][11]

In addition to her athletic skill, she is known for her naturally curly hair, and is sponsored by Paul Mitchell.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Aimee Berg (March 28, 2013). "Where Have You Gone, Lindsey Jacobellis?". Team USA.
  2. ^ "Olympics on Yahoo! Sports - News, Scores, Standings, Rumors, Fantasy Games". sports.yahoo.com. Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  3. ^ Gaillard, Eric (February 17, 2006). "Jacobellis loses shot at gold with stumble". Associated Press. MSNBC. Archived from the original on February 20, 2010. Retrieved December 29, 2009.
  4. ^ Sally Jenkins (February 18, 2006). "Jacobellis Biffs It". Washington Post.
  5. ^ John Branch (February 16, 2010). "Redemption, but Not for Jacobellis". New York Times.
  6. ^ Devon O'Neil (January 11, 2011). "Jacobellis four-peats in Snowboarder X". ESPN.
  7. ^ John Branch (February 16, 2014). "Lindsey Jacobellis Again Comes Up Short in Snowboard Cross". New York Times.
  8. ^ Branch, John (Feb 14, 2018). "The Haunting of Lindsey Jacobellis". The New York Times.
  9. ^ Nate Peterson (February 15, 2018). "Snowboarder Lindsey Jacobellis falls short again at Winter Olympics, finishes fourth". CBS Sports.
  10. ^ Barnes, Katie (April 24, 2017). "Preview of MTV series The Challenge: Champs vs. Pros". ESPN. Retrieved July 24, 2017.
  11. ^ Donnelly, Matthew Scott (June 20, 2017). "Who Was The Challenge: Champs vs. Pros' MVP?". MTV. Retrieved July 24, 2017.
  12. ^ "What Olympic Snowboarder Lindsey Jacobellis Uses on Her Curly Hair". Naturally Curly. February 15, 2018.

External links[edit]