List of Final Fantasy video games

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Final Fantasy is a video game series developed and published by Square Enix (formerly Square). The first title in the series, the eponymous Final Fantasy, premiered in Japan in 1987, and Final Fantasy games have been released almost every single year since. Fifteen games have been released as part of the main (numbered) series. Sequels, prequels, spin-offs, and related video games have been published, as well as numerous titles in other media forms. Each game in the main series takes place in a different fictional universe rather than serve as direct sequels to prior games, although some titles have received sequels, or prequels, set in the same universe.

Most of the games have been re-released for several different platforms, many of which have been included in bundled releases. The series as a whole is primarily composed of role-playing video games, but also includes massively multiplayer online role-playing games, third-person shooters, tower defense games, and tactical role-playing games. Final Fantasy games have been released on over a dozen video game consoles beginning with the Nintendo Entertainment System, as well as for personal computers and mobile phones. The series is Square Enix's most successful franchise, having sold over 100 million units worldwide as of June 2011, across both the main series and its spin-offs.[1] Final Fantasy's popularity has placed it as one of the best-selling video game franchises.[2]

Main series[edit]

Title Details

Original release dates:
  • JP: December 18, 1987[4]
  • NA: July 12, 1990[3]
  • PAL: March 14, 2003[5]
    (PlayStation version)
Release years by system:
1987 – Nintendo Entertainment System[4]
1989 – MSX[6]
2000 – WonderSwan Color[7]
2002 – PlayStation[8]
2004 – Game Boy Advance
2004 – Mobile phones[9]
2007 – PlayStation Portable (Final Fantasy Anniversary Edition)[10]
2010 – iOS[11]
2012 – Windows Phone[12]
2012 – Android
Notes:
  • Included in the Final Fantasy I-II (Family Computer, 1994), Final Fantasy Origins (PlayStation, 2002), and Final Fantasy I & II: Dawn of Souls (Game Boy Advance, 2004) bundles, and the Final Fantasy Mobile (Mobile phones, 2004) subseries[5][13][14][15]
  • NES version available on the Wii Virtual Console in Japan, North America & Europe/Australia. Also available on the Wii U & Nintendo 3DS Virtual Consoles in Japan.
  • PS one Classic available on the PlayStation Store to download for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita and PlayStation Portable in Japan and North America.
  • Game Boy Advance version available on the Wii U Virtual Console in Japan.
  • Included in the Nintendo Classic Mini.

Original release dates:
  • JP: December 17, 1988[4]
  • NA: April 8, 2003[5]
    (PlayStation version)
  • PAL: March 14, 2003[5]
    (PlayStation version)
Release years by system:
1988 – Family Computer[4]
2001 – WonderSwan Color[16]
2002 – PlayStation[17]
2004 – Game Boy Advance
2005 – Mobile phones[18]
2007 – PlayStation Portable (Final Fantasy II Anniversary Edition)[19]
2010 – iOS[20]
2012 – Android
Notes:
  • Included in the Final Fantasy I-II (Family Computer, 1994), Final Fantasy Origins (PlayStation, 2002), and Final Fantasy I & II: Dawn of Souls (Game Boy Advance, 2004) bundles, and the Final Fantasy Mobile (Mobile phones, 2005) subseries[5][13][14][15]
  • Famicom version available on the Wii, Wii U and Nintendo 3DS Virtual Consoles in Japan.
  • PS one Classic available on the PlayStation Store to download for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita and PlayStation Portable in Japan and North America.
  • Game Boy Advance version available on the Wii U Virtual Console in Japan.

Original release dates:
  • JP: April 27, 1990[4]
  • NA: November 14, 2006[21]
    (Nintendo DS version)
  • PAL: May 4, 2007[21]
    (Nintendo DS version)
Release years by system:
1990 – Family Computer[4]
2006 – Nintendo DS[21]
2011 – iOS
2012 – PlayStation Portable
2012 – Android[22]
2013 – Windows Phone
2014 – Microsoft Windows personal computer
Notes:
  • Nintendo DS version is a full remake of the game with 3D graphics.[23]
  • Famicom version available on the Wii, Wii U and Nintendo 3DS Virtual Consoles in Japan.

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
1991 – Super NES[25]
1991 – Super Famicom (Final Fantasy IV Easytype)[27]
1997 – PlayStation[28]
2002 – WonderSwan Color[29]
2005 – Game Boy Advance (Final Fantasy IV Advance)[30]
2007 – Nintendo DS[31]
2009 – Mobile Phones[32]
2011 – PlayStation Portable (Final Fantasy IV: The Complete Collection)
2012 – iOS
2013 – Android
2014 – Microsoft Windows personal computer
Notes:
  • First released in North America under the name Final Fantasy II on the Super NES; later releases of the game were under the Final Fantasy IV title.[33]
  • Re-released on the Super Famicom in Japan under the title Final Fantasy IV Easytype with an easier difficulty setting.[27]
  • Included in the Final Fantasy Collection (1999, PlayStation) and Final Fantasy Chronicles (2001, PlayStation) bundles, and the European release of the Final Fantasy Anthology (2002, PlayStation) bundle, as well as the Finest Fantasy For Advance subseries (2005, Game Boy Advance)[34][35][36][37]
  • The Nintendo DS version is a full remake of the game with 3D graphics and additional content.[27]
  • The PSP version of the game is a bundle of the original game, its sequel Final Fantasy IV: The After Years, and an all-new story (Final Fantasy IV Interlude) which is a tie-in between the other two games.
  • Super NES version available on the Wii Virtual Console in Japan, North America and Europe/Australia. Super NES and Game Boy Advance versions also available on the Wii U Virtual Console in Japan.
  • PS one Classic available on the PlayStation Store to download for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita and PlayStation Portable in Japan only.

Original release dates:
  • JP: December 6, 1992[25]
  • NA: October 5, 1999[36]
    (PlayStation version)
  • PAL: February 27, 2002[26]
    (PlayStation version)
Release years by system:
1992 – Super Famicom[25]
1998 – PlayStation[38]
2006 – Game Boy Advance (Final Fantasy V Advance)[39]
2013 – iOS
2013 – Android
2015 – Windows PC
Notes:
  • Included in the Final Fantasy Collection (1999, PlayStation) and the Final Fantasy Anthology (1999, PlayStation) bundles, as well as the Finest Fantasy For Advance subseries (2006, Game Boy Advance)[34][36][37]
  • Super Famicom version available on the Wii and Wii U Virtual Consoles in Japan, and Game Boy Advance version available on the Wii U Virtual Console in Japan.
  • PS one Classic available on the PlayStation Store to download for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita and PlayStation Portable.

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
1994 – Super NES[25]
1999 – PlayStation[41]
2006 – Game Boy Advance (Final Fantasy VI Advance)[42]
2014 – Android
2014 – iOS
2015 – Windows PC
Notes:
  • First released in North America under the name Final Fantasy III on the Super NES; later releases of the game were under the Final Fantasy VI title.[43]
  • Included in the Final Fantasy Collection (1999, PlayStation) and the North American release of the Final Fantasy Anthology (1999, PlayStation) bundles, as well as the Finest Fantasy for Advance subseries (2006, Game Boy Advance)[34][36][37]
  • Super NES version available on the Wii Virtual Console in Japan, North America and Europe/Australia. Super NES and Game Boy Advance versions also available on the Wii U Virtual Console in Japan.
  • PS one Classic available on the PlayStation Store to download for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita and PlayStation Portable.
  • Included in the Super NES Classic Edition by the name of Final Fantasy III

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
1997 – PlayStation[45]
1997 – PlayStation (Final Fantasy VII International)[47]
1998 – Microsoft Windows personal computer[48]
2012 – Microsoft Windows
2015 - iOS
2015 – PlayStation 4 (PlayStation Store)
2016 – Android
2019 – Nintendo Switch, Xbox One[49]
Notes:
  • International version released in Japan for PlayStation (1997, titled Final Fantasy VII International)[47]
  • PS one Classic available on the PlayStation Store to download for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita and PlayStation Portable.
  • Windows PC re-released in 2012 with upscaled graphics and additional features via Square Enix's online store. Removed in 2013 and released on Steam.
  • Japanese release of Windows PC version in 2013 includes features that were later included in the iOS, PS4 and Android ports but remain exclusive to Japan for the PC version.

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
1999 – PlayStation[45]
2000 – Microsoft Windows personal computer[52]
2013 – Microsoft Windows
2019 – Microsoft Windows, Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One (Final Fantasy VIII Remastered)
Notes:
  • PS one Classic available on the PlayStation Store to download for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita and PlayStation Portable.

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2000 – PlayStation[53]
2016 – Microsoft Windows, iOS, Android
2017 – PlayStation 4 (Digital Edition)
2019 – Nintendo Switch, Xbox One[49]
Notes:
  • Until December 31, 2010, the card mini-game in Final Fantasy IX, Tetra Master, was available on Square Enix's PlayOnline network service, featuring player versus player games.[54]
  • PS one Classic available on the PlayStation Store to download for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita and PlayStation Portable.

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2001 – PlayStation 2[55]
2002 – PlayStation 2 (Final Fantasy X International)[55]
2013 – PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita (Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster)
2015 – PlayStation 4 (Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster)
2016 – Microsoft Windows (Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster)
2017 - iOS, Android (Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster)
2019 – Nintendo Switch, Xbox One (Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster)[49]
Notes:
  • International version released in Japan for PlayStation 2 (2002, titled Final Fantasy X International), containing a short movie that bridges the story of Final Fantasy X with that of its sequel, Final Fantasy X-2[56]
  • Included in the Final Fantasy X/X-2 Ultimate Box bundle (2005)[57]

Original release dates:
  • JP: May 16, 2002[59]
  • NA: October 28, 2003[58]
    (PC version)
  • PAL: September 16, 2004[51]
    (PC version)
Release years by system:
2002 – PlayStation 2, Microsoft Windows personal computer[59]
2006 – Xbox 360[60]
TBA – iOS, Android[61]
Notes:
  • The first massively multiplayer online role-playing game in the series[62]
  • Five expansion packs have been released: Rise of the Zilart (2003),[63] Chains of Promathia (2004),[64] Treasures of Aht Urhgan (2006),[65] Wings of the Goddess (2007),[66] and Seekers of Adoulin (2013).[67]
  • Six add-ons, or small expansions, have been released: A Crystalline Prophecy (March 2009), A Moogle Kupo d'Etat (July 2009), A Shantotto Ascension (October 2009),[68] Vision of Abyssea (June 2010), Scars of Abyssea (August 2010), and Heroes of Abyssea (November 2010).[69]
  • The first expansion was included in the North American release (2003).[70]
  • The first two expansions were included in the European release (2004).[71]
  • The first three expansions were included in the Xbox 360 release (2006).[70]
  • Final Fantasy XI: The Vana'diel Collection includes the game and the first two expansions.
  • Final Fantasy XI: The Vana'diel Collection 2007 includes the game and the first three expansions.[72]
  • Final Fantasy XI: The Vana'diel Collection 2008 includes the game and the first four expansions.[73]
  • Final Fantasy XI: Ultimate Collection (2010) includes the game, the first four expansions, and the first three add-ons.[74]
  • Final Fantasy XI: Ultimate Collection Abyssea Edition (2011) includes the game, the first four expansions, and all six add-ons.
  • Final Fantasy XI: Ultimate Collection Seeker's Edition (2013) includes the game, all five expansions, and all six add-ons.
  • Final Fantasy XI terminated for Xbox 360 and PlayStation 2 on March 31, 2016. New mobile client under development for 2016.[61]

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2006 – PlayStation 2[76]
2007 – PlayStation 2 (Final Fantasy XII International Zodiac Job System)[78]
2017 – PlayStation 4 (Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age)
2018 – Microsoft Windows (Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age)
2019 – Nintendo Switch, Xbox One (Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age)[49]
Notes:
  • International version released in Japan for PlayStation 2 (2007, titled Final Fantasy XII International Zodiac Job System)[78]
  • The international version is part of the Ivalice Alliance subseries.[79]

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2009 – PlayStation 3, Xbox 360[80]
2010 – Xbox 360 (Final Fantasy XIII Ultimate Hits International)[80]
2014 – PC
2015 – iOS, Android
Notes:
  • Part of the Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy subseries[79]
  • International version released in Japan for the Xbox 360 (2010, titled Final Fantasy XIII Ultimate Hits International)[80]
  • Only Final Fantasy game on the PlayStation 3 not available on the PlayStation Store.

Original release date:
  • WW: September 30, 2010[82]
Release years by system:
2010 – Microsoft Windows[82]
Notes:

Original release dates:
  • JP: August 27, 2013
  • NA: August 27, 2013
  • PAL: August 27, 2013
Release years by system:
2013 – Microsoft Windows personal computer, PlayStation 3
2014 – PlayStation 4
2015 – Mac OSX
TBA – Xbox One
Notes:
  • Relaunch of Final Fantasy XIV, rebuilt with a new engine, gameplay and server after the negative reception of the original version.[83]
  • Expansion pack titled Heavensward released in 2015.
  • Expansion pack titled Stormblood released in 2017.
  • Expansion pack titled Shadowbringers released in 2019.

Original release date:
  • WW: November 29, 2016
Release years by system:
2016 – PlayStation 4, Xbox One
2018 – Microsoft Windows (Final Fantasy XV: Windows Edition)
2019 – Stadia
Notes:
  • Announced at E3 2006 as Final Fantasy Versus XIII[84]
  • Originally part of the Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy subseries[79]
  • First mainline single-player Final Fantasy to have a global release date
  • DLC expansions titled Episode Gladiolus, Episode Prompto and Episode Ignis released in 2017
  • Online cooperative multiplayer expansion titled Final Fantasy XV: Comrades released in 2017
  • A Royal Edition with all previous updates, DLC and new contents released in 2018 for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One
  • DLC expansions titled Episode Aranea, Episode Luna and Episode Noctis cancelled in 2018
  • DLC expansion titled Episode Ardyn released in 2019

Proposed release date:
TBA
Proposed system release:
TBA – PlayStation 5
Notes:
  • Announced during the PlayStation 5 showcase event in 2020[85]

Main series-related games[edit]

Title Details

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2003 – PlayStation 2[59]
2004 – PlayStation 2 (Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission)[86]
2013 – PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita (Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster)
2015 – PlayStation 4 (Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster)
2016 – PC (Steam) (Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster)
2019 – Nintendo Switch, Xbox One (Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster)[49]
Notes:

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2005 – Mobile phones[88]
Notes:

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2007 – Nintendo DS[92]
Notes:

Original release dates:
  • JP: February 18, 2008[95]
  • NA: June 1, 2009[94]
    (WiiWare version)
  • PAL: June 5, 2009[94]
    (WiiWare version)
Release years by system:
2008 – Mobile phones[95]
2009 – WiiWare[94]
2011 – PlayStation Portable (Final Fantasy IV: The Complete Collection)
2013 – iOS, Android
2015 – PC (Steam)
Notes:
  • Sequel to Final Fantasy IV[95]
  • Released in episodic format[95]
  • The PSP version of the game is a bundle of Final Fantasy IV, The After Years, and Interlude, an all-new story which is a tie-in between the other two games.
  • iOS, Android and PC versions are a full remake of the game in the style of the remakes of Final Fantasy III and IV.

Cancellation date:
2011
Proposed system release:
Notes:
  • Spin-off sequel of Final Fantasy XII initially developed by GRIN before being handed over to another, undisclosed studio and subsequently cancelled.[96]
Final Fantasy VII G-Bike

Original release date:
  • JP: October 30, 2014
Release years by system:
2014 – Android, iOS
Notes:
  • International release cancelled.
  • Terminated on December 15, 2015.
Final Fantasy Grandmasters

Original release date:
  • JP: September 30, 2015
Release years by system:
2015 – Android, iOS
Notes:
  • Spinoff of Final Fantasy XI
  • Terminated on April 25, 2019.

Final Fantasy Tactics[edit]

Title Details

Original release dates:
  • JP: June 20, 1997[45]
  • NA: January 28, 1998[50]
  • PAL: October 5, 2007[97]
    (PlayStation Portable version)
Release years by system:
1997 – PlayStation[45]
2007 – PlayStation Portable (Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions)[97]
2011 – iOS (Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions)
2015 – Android (Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions)
Notes:
  • Tactical role-playing game featuring concepts and themes from the Final Fantasy series[98]
  • Its re-release, titled Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions (2007), is part of the Ivalice Alliance subseries.[79]
  • Set in the world of Ivalice, which was later reused in main series game Final Fantasy XII[99]
  • PS one Classic available on the PlayStation Store to download for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita and PlayStation Portable in Japan and North America.

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2003 – Game Boy Advance[59]
Notes:
  • Tactical role-playing game featuring concepts and themes from the Final Fantasy series[100]
  • Not a sequel to Final Fantasy Tactics[100]
  • Set in a dream version of Ivalice, which features places, characters, and races later to be seen in main series game Final Fantasy XII[100]
  • Available on the Wii U Virtual Console in North America, Europe/Australia and Japan.

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2007 – Nintendo DS[102]
Notes:
  • Tactical role-playing game featuring concepts and themes from the Final Fantasy series[104]
  • Sequel to Final Fantasy Tactics Advance, though set in the real version of Ivalice[105]
  • Part of the Ivalice Alliance subseries[79]

Original release dates:
  • JP: May 28, 2013
Release years by system:
2013 – iOS, Android
Notes:
  • Tactical role-playing game with social features and multiplayer battles.
  • Terminated on July 31, 2014.

Compilation of Final Fantasy VII[edit]

Title Details

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2004 – Mobile phones[106]
Notes:

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2006 – PlayStation 2[76]
2008 – PlayStation 2 (Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII International)[110]
Notes:
  • Third-person shooter with role-playing game elements[111]
  • Sequel to Final Fantasy VII, taking place three years after the game[111]
  • International version released in Japan (2008, PlayStation 2)[110]
  • Part of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII subseries[79]

Original release dates:
  • JP: August 18, 2006
  • NA: August 22, 2006
Release years by system:
2006 – Mobile phones[76]
Notes:
  • A "lost episode" was released for Japanese mobile phones on August 18, 2006 which takes places midway through Dirge of Cerberus.[76]
  • Part of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII subseries[79]
  • The game is no longer available to download, with Final Fantasy Mobile ending on March 31, 2018.[112]

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2007 – PlayStation Portable[92]
Notes:
  • Prequel to Final Fantasy VII, chronicling the events leading up to the game[115]
  • Part of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII subseries[79]
  • Only Final Fantasy game on the PlayStation Portable not available on the PlayStation Store.

Original release dates:
  • WW: April 10, 2020
Release years by system:
2020 – PlayStation 4
Notes:
  • Announced at the 2015 Electronic Entertainment Expo during the PlayStation conference
  • First in a planned series of games remaking the 1997 PlayStation game Final Fantasy VII

Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy[edit]

Title Details

Original release dates:
  • JP: October 27, 2011[116]
  • WW: March 17, 2015 (HD only)
Release years by system:
2011 – PlayStation Portable
2015 – PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC (Steam) (Final Fantasy Type-0 HD)
Notes:

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2011 – PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
2014 – PC (Steam)
2015 – iOS, Android
Notes:

Original release dates:
  • JP: November 21, 2013
  • NA: February 11, 2014
  • AU: February 13, 2014
  • PAL: February 14, 2014
Release years by system:
2013 – PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
2015 – PC (Steam)
2016 – iOS, Android
Notes:

Original release date:
  • JP: May 14, 2014
Release years by system:
2014 – Android, iOS
Notes:

Original release date:
  • CHN: December 14, 2016
  • WW: August 15, 2017
Release years by system:
2016 – Android, iOS
Notes:

Final Fantasy XV Universe[edit]

Title Details
Platinum Demo – Final Fantasy XV

Original release date:
  • WW: March 30, 2016
Release years by system:
2016 – PlayStation 4 (PlayStation Store), Xbox One (Microsoft Store)
Notes:
  • Free-to-play prologue to Final Fantasy XV
  • The main protagonist is eight-year-old prince Noctis Lucis Caelum
  • The game was delisted from the PlayStation Store and Microsoft Store on March 31, 2017
Justice Monsters Five

Original release date:
  • WW: August 30, 2016
Release years by system:
2016 – iOS, Android
Notes:
  • A mobile pinball game based on a minigame within Final Fantasy XV
  • The game ended its service on March 27, 2017[124]

Original release date:
  • WW: November 29, 2016
Release years by system:
2016 – PlayStation 4 (PlayStation Store), Xbox One (Microsoft Store)
Notes:
  • An arcade beat-'em-up spin-off set 30 years prior to Final Fantasy XV

Original release date:
  • WW: June 29, 2017
Release years by system:
2017 – iOS, Android
Notes:
  • Based on Final Fantasy XV, features its characters and soundtrack

Original release date:
  • WW: September 13, 2017
Release years by system:
2017 – iOS, Android
Notes:
  • A mobile remake of the 1986 King's Knight and a tie-in to Final Fantasy XV.
  • Referenced in Final Fantasy XV, as a game enjoyed by Noctis Lucis Caelum and his friends.
  • The game ended its service on June 26, 2018

Original release date:
  • WW: November 21, 2017
Release years by system:
2017 – PlayStation 4 (PlayStation Store)
Notes:

Original release date:
  • WW: February 8, 2018
Release years by system:
2018 – iOS, Android, Microsoft Windows (Microsoft Store)
2018 – Nintendo Switch (Nintendo eShop), PlayStation 4 (PlayStation Store), Xbox One (Microsoft Store) (Final Fantasy XV: Pocket Edition HD)
Notes:

Spin-offs[edit]

Title Details


Release years by system:
1990 – Game Boy (The Final Fantasy Legend)[125]
1991 – Game Boy (Final Fantasy Legend II)[126]
1993 – Game Boy (Final Fantasy Legend III)[127]
Notes:
  • Though these three games were marketed in North America with "Final Fantasy" in the title,[128] they were originally created as entries in the SaGa series of games. The Final Fantasy name was dropped for later SaGa games brought to North America.[128]
  • None of the three games bore any Final Fantasy branding in their original Japanese versions, where they were titled
    • Makai Toushi Sa・Ga (魔界塔士 Sa・Ga, lit. Warrior in the Tower of the Spirit World ~ Sa・Ga),
    • Sa・Ga2: Hihō Densetsu (Sa・Ga2: 秘宝伝説, lit. Sa・Ga2: The Treasure Legend) and
    • Jikuu no Hasha ~ Sa・Ga3 [Kanketsu Hen] (時空の覇者 Sa・Ga3 [完結編], lit. The Ruler of Time and Space ~ Sa・Ga3 [Final Chapter]).[128]
  • The three games were republished by Sunsoft (again under the Final Fantasy Legend name) in 1998.[129]
  • Not to be confused with the Final Fantasy Legends mobile games released in Japan.



Original release dates:
Release years by system:
1991 – Game Boy[130]
2016 – iOS, Android, PlayStation Vita (as Adventures of Mana)
2019 – Nintendo Switch (as Collection of Mana)
Notes:
  • Released in Japan as Seiken Densetsu: Final Fantasy Gaiden (聖剣伝説 ~ファイナルファンタジー外伝~, Legend of the Holy Sword: Final Fantasy Gaiden) and in Europe as Mystic Quest[130]
  • First released as a side story for the Final Fantasy series, it has generated its own game series, called Mana.[130]
  • Featured some elements from the Final Fantasy series which did not reappear in later titles or in its remake, Sword of Mana (2003)[130]

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
1993 – Super NES[132]
Notes:
  • First Final Fantasy game developed specifically for an American audience
  • Role-playing game with action-adventure elements[130]
  • Released in Japan as Final Fantasy USA: Mystic Quest and in Europe as Mystic Quest Legend[134]


Release years by system:
1997 – PlayStation (Chocobo no Fushigina Dungeon (Chocobo's Mysterious Dungeon))[135]
1998 – PlayStation (Chocobo's Dungeon 2)[136]
1999 – PlayStation (Chocobo Racing)[137]
1999 – PlayStation (Chocobo Collection, includes Chocobo Racing, Chocobo Stallion and Dice de Chocobo)[138]
2000 – WonderSwan (Hataraku Chocobo (Chocobo on the Job))[139]
2002 – Mobile phones (Dokodemo Chocobo (Chocobo Anywhere))[140]
2002 – Game Boy Advance (Chocobo Land: A Game of Dice)[141]
2003 – Mobile phones (Dokodemo Chocobo 2: Dasshutsu! Yūreisen (Chocobo Anywhere 2: Escape! Ghost Ship))[142]
2003 – Mobile phones (Choco-Mate)[143][144]
2004 – Mobile phones (Dokodemo Chocobo 2.5: Sennyū! Kodai Iseki (Chocobo Anywhere 2.5: Infiltrate! Ancient Ruins))
2004 – Mobile phones (Dokodemo Chocobo 3: Taose! Niji Iro Daimaō (Chocobo Anywhere 3: Defeat! The Great Rainbow-Colored Demon))[145]
2006 – Mobile phones (Chocobo de Mobile)[146]
2006 – Nintendo DS (Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo Tales)[147]
2007 – Wii (Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo's Dungeon)[148]
2008 – Nintendo DS (Cid to Chocobo no Fushigi na Dungeon: Toki Wasure no Meikyū DS+ (Cid and Chocobo's Mysterious Dungeon: the Labyrinth of Forgotten Time DS+))[149]
2008 – Nintendo DS (Chocobo to Mahō no Ehon: Majō to Shōjo to Gonin no Yūsha (Chocobo and the Magic Picture Book: The Witch, the Girl, and the Five Heroes))[150]
2010 – iPad (Chocobo Panic)
2010 – Mobile phones, Facebook (Chocobo's Crystal Tower)
2012 – iOS, Android (Chocobo No Chocotto Nouen (Chocobo's Chocotto Farm))
Cancelled – Nintendo 3DS (Chocobo Racing 3D)
2019 – Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4 (Chocobo's Mystery Dungeon: Every Buddy!)[49]
Notes:
  • Series of games of different genres featuring a Chocobo, a creature from the Final Fantasy games, as the main character with environments based on the Final Fantasy series[151]
  • Only Chocobo's Dungeon 2, Chocobo Racing, Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo Tales, Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo's Dungeon, Chocobo Panic and Chocobo's Crystal Tower have been released outside Japan.[130]
Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles series


Release years by system:
2003 – Nintendo GameCube (Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles)[152]
2007 – Nintendo DS (Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles: Ring of Fates)[153]
2008 – WiiWare (Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles: My Life as a King)[154]
2009 – Wii (Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles: Echoes of Time)[155]
2009 – Nintendo DS (Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles: Echoes of Time)[155]
2009 – WiiWare (Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles: My Life as a Darklord)[156]
2009 – Wii (Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles: The Crystal Bearers)[157]
2020 – Android, iOS, Nintendo Switch (Nintendo eShop), PlayStation 4 (PlayStation Store) (Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles Remastered Edition)
Notes:


Release years by system:
2008 – Mobile phones (Crystal Guardians)[159]
2008 – iOS, Wiiware, Xbox Live Arcade, PlayStation Network (Crystal Defenders)[160]
2009 – iOS (Crystal Defenders: Vanguard Storm)[161]
2011 – Android (Crystal Defenders)
Notes:
Dissidia Final Fantasy series


Release years by system:
2008 – PlayStation Portable (Dissidia Final Fantasy)[163]
2011 – PlayStation Portable (Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy)[163]
2015 – Arcade (Dissidia Final Fantasy)[163]
2017 – iOS, Android (Dissidia Final Fantasy Opera Omnia)
2018 – PlayStation 4 (Dissidia Final Fantasy NT)
2019 – PC (Steam)(Dissidia Final Fantasy NT)[164]
Notes:
Final Fantasy: Unlimited with U

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2002 – Mobile phones[165]
Notes:
Final Fantasy: Unlimited on PC - Meikyū ~ Kuroki Yume no Kioku ~

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2003 – Microsoft Windows personal computer[166]
Notes:
  • A personal computer game set in the Final Fantasy: Unlimited universe, published by Amada Printing[166]
  • Card battle game

Original release dates:
  • JP: October 29, 2009[167]
  • NA: October 5, 2010
  • PAL: October 8, 2010
Release years by system:
2009 – Nintendo DS[167]
Notes:
  • Released in Japan as Hikari no 4 Senshi: Final Fantasy Gaiden (光の4戦士 -ファイナルファンタジー外伝-, Hikari no 4 Senshi Fainaru Fantajī Gaiden, lit. "4 Heroes of Light: Final Fantasy Gaiden")
  • Side story of the Final Fantasy series[168]

Original release dates:
  • JP: September 6, 2010
  • NA: August 31, 2012 (smartphone version)
  • EU: August 31, 2012 (smartphone version)
Release years by system:
2010 – Mobile phones
2012 – iOS, Android
Notes:
  • Released in Japan as Final Fantasy Legends: Hikari to Yami no Senshi (ファイナルファンタジー レジェンズ 光と闇の戦士, Fainaru Fantajī Rejenzu: Hikari to Yami no Senshi, lit. "Final Fantasy Legends: Warriors of Light and Darkness")
  • Side story of the Final Fantasy series

Original release dates:
  • JP: January 6, 2012
  • NA: December 14, 2012
Release years by system:
2012 – iOS, Android
Notes:
  • Online social game of the Final Fantasy series
  • Terminated

Original release dates:
  • JP: February 16, 2012
  • NA: July 3, 2012
  • EU: July 6, 2012
Release years by system:
2012 – Nintendo 3DS, iOS
Notes:
  • Rhythm game of the Final Fantasy series
  • Only Final Fantasy game on the Nintendo 3DS not available on the Nintendo eShop.

Original release date:
  • JP: November 30, 2012
Release years by system:
2012 – iOS, Android
Notes:
  • Free-to-play social multiplayer role-playing game
  • Terminated.

Original release dates:
  • JP: January 17, 2013
  • NA: January 17, 2013
  • EU: January 17, 2013
Release years by system:
2013 – iOS, Android
Notes:
  • Free-to-play mobile game featuring characters and settings from the Final Fantasy series
Pictlogica Final Fantasy

Original release date:
  • JP: October 28, 2013
Release years by system:
2013 – Android, iOS
2017 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • Released only Japan

Original release dates:
  • JP: April 24, 2014
  • NA: September 16, 2014
  • EU: September 19, 2014
Release years by system:
2014 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • Rhythm game of the Final Fantasy series

Original release date:
  • JP: September 16, 2014
Release years by system:
2014 – Android, iOS
Notes:
  • Typing game featuring characters from the Final Fantasy series
  • Terminated

Original release dates:
  • JP: September 24, 2014
  • NA: March 26, 2015
  • EU: March 26, 2015
Release years by system:
2014 – Android, iOS
Notes:
  • Free-to-play mobile role-playing game featuring characters, scenarios and major battles from the Final Fantasy series

Original release date:
  • JP: November 10, 2014
Release years by system:
2014 – iOS, Android
Notes:
  • Free-to-play social multiplayer role-playing game
  • Terminated
Heavenstrike Rivals

Original release date(s):
  • WW: November 14, 2014
Release years by system:
2014 – iOS, Android, PC (Steam)
Notes:
  • Square Enix franchise characters, including those from the worlds of Final Fantasy, appeared as playable units.
  • Terminated

Original release date:
  • JP: December 18, 2014
  • NA: January 26, 2016
  • EU: January 29, 2016
Release years by system:
2014 – Nintendo 3DS[169]
Notes:
  • Multiplayer action role-playing game
  • Features up to four-person co-op gameplay[169]
Final Fantasy Portal App

Original release date:
  • JP: February 4, 2015
  • WW: August 19, 2015
Release years by system:
2015 – Android, iOS
Notes:
  • Contains the "Triple Triad" card game from Final Fantasy VIII

Original release date:
  • JP: February 12, 2015
  • WW: November 1, 2017
Release years by system:
2015 – Android, iOS
Notes:
  • Released as Final Fantasy Legends: Toki no Suishō in Japan
  • Title literally translates to "Crystal of Space-Time"
  • Free-to-play mobile role-playing game and sidestory to the Final Fantasy series
  • In 2016, after a massive update, rebranded as Final Fantasy Legends II in Japan
  • In 2017, the old free-to-play version of the game was shut down and a paid one was re-launched with the same name in Japan, and released worldwide as Final Fantasy Dimensions II

Original release date:
  • JP: June 4, 2015
  • WW: August 3, 2016
Release years by system:
2015 – Android, iOS
2017 – PC (Steam)[170]
Notes:
  • Free-to-play mobile role-playing game.
  • Terminated

Original release date:
  • JP: October 22, 2015
  • WW: June 29, 2016
Release years by system:
2015 – Android, iOS
Notes:
  • Free-to-play mobile role-playing game and sidestory to the Final Fantasy series
  • Features characters from the Final Fantasy series

Original release date:
  • JP: October 27, 2016
  • EU: October 28, 2016
  • NA: October 25, 2016
Release years by system:
2016 – PlayStation Vita, PlayStation 4
2018 – PlayStation 4 (PlayStation Store), Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, PC (Steam) (World of Final Fantasy Maxima)[49]
Notes:
  • Features characters from the Final Fantasy series
  • Physical version of World of Final Fantasy Maxima released only for Xbox One and Nintendo Switch.[171]

Original release date:
  • JP: November 14, 2019
  • WW: March 25, 2020
Release years by system:
2019 – Android, iOS
Notes:
  • Spin-off of Final Fantasy Brave Exvius.

Bundled releases[edit]

Title Details

Original release date:
Release years by system:
1994 – Family Computer[13]
Notes:
Final Fantasy Collection

Original release date:
Release years by system:
1999 – PlayStation[34]
Notes:
Final Fantasy Anthology

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
1999 – PlayStation[36]
Notes:
  • North American release includes PlayStation ports of Final Fantasy V and Final Fantasy VI with a special edition soundtrack CD[172]
  • PAL release includes PlayStation ports of Final Fantasy IV and Final Fantasy V[26]

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2001 – PlayStation[35]
Notes:
  • North America-exclusive bundle of the PlayStation ports of Final Fantasy IV and Chrono Trigger[35]

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2002 – PlayStation[5]
Notes:

Original release dates:
Release years by system:
2004 – Game Boy Advance[14]
Notes:
  • Bundle of the Game Boy Advance ports of Final Fantasy and Final Fantasy II, including two special bonus areas[173]
Final Fantasy X/X-2 Ultimate Box

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2005 – PlayStation 2[57]
Notes:

Original release dates:
  • JP: March 24, 2011
  • NA: April 19, 2011
  • EU: April 21, 2011
  • AU: April 28, 2011
Release years by system:
2011 – PlayStation Portable
Notes:
Final Fantasy XIII/XIII-2 Dual Pack

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2012 – PlayStation 3[175]
Notes:
Final Fantasy 25th Anniversary Ultimate Box

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2012 – Various[176]
Notes:
  • Japan-exclusive boxed set of the first thirteen Final Fantasy games on PlayStation consoles[176]
  • Includes Final Fantasy through Final Fantasy IX on PlayStation (except Final Fantasy III on PlayStation Portable), Final Fantasy X through Final Fantasy XII on PlayStation 2, and Final Fantasy XIII on PlayStation 3[176]
  • Includes a code redeemable for in-game Moogle Earrings in Final Fantasy XIV[176]
Final Fantasy XIII Ultimate Collection

Original release date:
Release years by system:
2013 – PlayStation 3
Notes:

Branded subseries[edit]

These are groups of games or system-specific releases of games that are branded or marketed together. Unlike bundles, they were made available as individual products.

Title Details


Release years by system:
2004 – Mobile phones (Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII)[106]
2006 – PlayStation 2 (Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII)[76]
2006 – Mobile phones (Dirge of Cerberus Lost Episode: Final Fantasy VII)[76]
2007 – PlayStation Portable (Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII)[92]
2008 – PlayStation 2 (Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII International)[110]
Notes:
  • Brand name for a series of games and animated features based in the world and continuity of Final Fantasy VII, though it does not include Final Fantasy VII itself[79]
Final Fantasy Mobile series


Release years by system:
2004 – Mobile phones (Final Fantasy)[9]
2005 – Mobile phones (Final Fantasy II)[18]
Notes:
  • Brand name for mobile phone ports of Final Fantasy and Final Fantasy II, which were released separately for two different mobile phone models[15]
  • The Final Fantasy remake is also called Final Fantasy i and Final Fantasy EZ, depending on the phone.[15]
Finest Fantasy for Advance series


Release years by system:
2005 – Game Boy Advance (Final Fantasy IV Advance)[30]
2006 – Game Boy Advance (Final Fantasy V Advance)[39]
2006 – Game Boy Advance (Final Fantasy VI Advance)[42]
Notes:
  • Brand name for the Game Boy Advance ports of Final Fantasy IV, V and VI with bonus quests and dungeons[37]
  • Outside Japan, the name was not used.


Release years by system:
2006 – PlayStation 2 (Final Fantasy XII)[78]
2007 – Nintendo DS (Final Fantasy XII: Revenant Wings)[92]
2007 – PlayStation Portable (Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions)[97]
2007 – Nintendo DS (Final Fantasy Tactics A2: Grimoire of the Rift)[102]
Notes:


Release years by system:
2009 – PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 (Final Fantasy XIII)[80]
2011 – PlayStation Portable (Final Fantasy Type-0)
2011 – PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 (Final Fantasy XIII-2)
2013 – Android, iOS (Final Fantasy Agito)
2014 – PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 (Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII)
2016 – PlayStation 4, Xbox One (Final Fantasy XV)
2016 – Android, iOS, PC (Final Fantasy Awakening)
Notes:
  • Brand name for games thematically connected to Final Fantasy XIII[79]
  • Includes Final Fantasy XIII, Final Fantasy XIII-2, Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII, Final Fantasy Type-0, Final Fantasy Agito, Final Fantasy XV and Final Fantasy Awakening[79]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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