List of Masters Tournament champions

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Jack Nicklaus, six-time Masters champion in 1963, 1965, 1966, 1972, 1975, and 1986, which is a record, is one of three golfers to successfully defend his title. He is also one of five champions to win wire-to-wire, in 1972.

The Masters Tournament is a golf competition that was established in 1934, with Horton Smith winning the inaugural tournament.[1] The Masters is the first of four major championships to be played each year, with the final round of the Masters always being scheduled for the second Sunday in April.[2] The Masters is the only one of the four majors to use the same course every year; the Augusta National Golf Club.[3] Masters champions are automatically invited to play in the other three majors (the U.S. Open, the Open Championship (British Open), and the PGA Championship) for the next five years, and earn a lifetime invitation to the Masters. They also receive membership on the PGA Tour for the following five seasons and invitations to the Players Championship for the five years following their victory.[4] The champion also receives the "Green Jacket", the first one being won by Sam Snead in 1949. The champion takes the jacket home for a year and returns it thereafter. A multiple champion will only have one jacket unless his size changes dramatically.[5]

Jack Nicklaus holds the record for the most Masters victories, winning the tournament six times during his career. Nicklaus is also the oldest winner of the Masters: he was 46 years 82 days old when he won in 1986.[6] Nicklaus, Nick Faldo, and Tiger Woods co-hold the record for most consecutive victories with two. Woods was the youngest winner of the Masters, 21 years 104 days old when he won in 1997.[6] Woods also set the record for the widest winning margin (12 strokes). The lowest winning score, with 268, 20-under-par, was scored by Dustin Johnson in 2020.[7]

The highest winning score of 289 (+1) was originally set by Sam Snead in 1954, it was equalled by Jack Burke Jr. in 1956, and Zach Johnson in 2007.[8] Five golfers have won the Masters wire-to-wire; Craig Wood in 1941, Arnold Palmer in 1960, Nicklaus in 1972, Raymond Floyd in 1976, and Jordan Spieth in 2015.[9] Other players have led wire-to-wire if ties after a round are included, most recently Dustin Johnson in the 2020 Masters Tournament. Hideki Matsuyama is the current champion. He won the 2021 Masters Tournament with a score of 278 (−10).[10]

Champions[edit]

By year[edit]

Arnold Palmer, four-time Masters Champion 1958, 1960, 1962, and 1964. He is one of five champions to win wire-to-wire with his victory in 1960.
Tiger Woods, five-time Masters Champion in 1997, 2001, 2002, 2005, and 2019. Tiger is one of three golfers to successfully defend his title
Sam Snead, three-time Masters Champion in 1949, 1952, 1954
Gary Player, three-time Masters Champion in 1961, 1974, and 1978
Nick Faldo, three-time Masters Champion in 1989, 1990, and 1996, and is one of three golfers to successfully defend his title
Phil Mickelson, three-time Masters Champion in 2004, 2006, and 2010
Key
Champion won in a playoff Tournament won in a playoff
Masters Tournament champions
Year Country Champion Total score To par[11][a] Notes
1934  United States Horton Smith 284 −4 [12]
1935  United States Gene SarazenChampion won in a playoff[c] 282 −6 [13]
1936  United States Horton Smith (2) 285 −3 [14]
1937  United States Byron Nelson 283 −5 [15]
1938  United States Henry Picard 285 −3 [16]
1939  United States Ralph Guldahl 279 −9 [17]
1940  United States Jimmy Demaret 280 −8 [18]
1941  United States Craig Wood 280 −8 [19]
1942  United States Byron Nelson (2) Champion won in a playoff[d] 280 −8 [20][21]
1943 None[b] [21]
1944 None [21]
1945 None [21]
1946  United States Herman Keiser 282 −6 [22]
1947  United States Jimmy Demaret (2) 281 −7 [23]
1948  United States Claude Harmon 279 −9 [24]
1949  United States Sam Snead 282 −6 [25]
1950  United States Jimmy Demaret (3) 283 −5 [26]
1951  United States Ben Hogan 280 −8 [27]
1952  United States Sam Snead (2) 286 −2 [28]
1953  United States Ben Hogan (2) 274 −14 [29]
1954  United States Sam Snead (3) Champion won in a playoff[e] 289 +1 [30]
1955  United States Cary Middlecoff 279 −9 [31]
1956  United States Jack Burke Jr. 289 +1 [32]
1957  United States Doug Ford 283 −5 [33]
1958  United States Arnold Palmer 284 −4 [34]
1959  United States Art Wall Jr. 284 −4 [35]
1960  United States Arnold Palmer (2) 282 −6 [36]
1961  South Africa Gary Player 280 −8 [37]
1962  United States Arnold Palmer (3) Champion won in a playoff[f] 280 −8 [38]
1963  United States Jack Nicklaus 286 −2 [39]
1964  United States Arnold Palmer (4) 276 −12 [40]
1965  United States Jack Nicklaus (2) 271 −17 [41]
1966  United States Jack Nicklaus (3) Champion won in a playoff[g] 288 E [42]
1967  United States Gay Brewer 280 −8 [43]
1968  United States Bob Goalby 277 −11 [44]
1969  United States George Archer 281 −7 [45]
1970  United States Billy CasperChampion won in a playoff[h] 279 −9 [46]
1971  United States Charles Coody 279 −9 [47]
1972  United States Jack Nicklaus (4) 286 −2 [48]
1973  United States Tommy Aaron 283 −5 [49]
1974  South Africa Gary Player (2) 278 −10 [50]
1975  United States Jack Nicklaus (5) 276 −12 [51]
1976  United States Raymond Floyd 271 −17 [52]
1977  United States Tom Watson 276 −12 [53]
1978  South Africa Gary Player (3) 277 −11 [54]
1979  United States Fuzzy ZoellerChampion won in a playoff[i] 280 −8 [55]
1980  Spain Seve Ballesteros 275 −13 [56]
1981  United States Tom Watson (2) 280 −8 [57]
1982  United States Craig StadlerChampion won in a playoff[j] 284 −4 [58]
1983  Spain Seve Ballesteros (2) 280 −8 [59]
1984  United States Ben Crenshaw 277 −11 [60]
1985  West Germany Bernhard Langer 282 −6 [61]
1986  United States Jack Nicklaus (6) 279 −9 [62]
1987  United States Larry MizeChampion won in a playoff[k] 285 −3 [63]
1988  Scotland Sandy Lyle 281 −7 [64]
1989  England Nick FaldoChampion won in a playoff[l] 283 −5 [65]
1990  England Nick Faldo (2) Champion won in a playoff[m] 278 −10 [66]
1991  Wales Ian Woosnam 277 −11 [67]
1992  United States Fred Couples 275 −13 [68]
1993  Germany Bernhard Langer (2) 277 −11 [69]
1994  Spain José María Olazábal 279 −9 [70]
1995  United States Ben Crenshaw (2) 274 −14 [71]
1996  England Nick Faldo (3) 276 −12 [72]
1997  United States Tiger Woods 270 −18 [73]
1998  United States Mark O'Meara 279 −9 [74]
1999  Spain José María Olazábal (2) 280 −8 [75]
2000  Fiji Vijay Singh 278 −10 [76]
2001  United States Tiger Woods (2) 272 −16 [77]
2002  United States Tiger Woods (3) 276 −12 [78]
2003  Canada Mike WeirChampion won in a playoff[n] 281 −7 [79]
2004  United States Phil Mickelson 279 −9 [80]
2005  United States Tiger Woods (4) Champion won in a playoff[o] 276 −12 [81]
2006  United States Phil Mickelson (2) 281 −7 [82]
2007  United States Zach Johnson 289 +1 [83]
2008  South Africa Trevor Immelman 280 −8 [84]
2009  Argentina Ángel CabreraChampion won in a playoff[p] 276 −12 [85]
2010  United States Phil Mickelson (3) 272 −16 [86]
2011  South Africa Charl Schwartzel 274 −14 [87]
2012  United States Bubba WatsonChampion won in a playoff[q] 278 −10 [88]
2013  Australia Adam ScottChampion won in a playoff[r] 279 −9 [89]
2014  United States Bubba Watson (2) 280 −8 [90]
2015  United States Jordan Spieth 270 −18 [91]
2016  England Danny Willett 283 −5 [92]
2017  Spain Sergio GarcíaChampion won in a playoff[s] 279 −9 [93]
2018  United States Patrick Reed 273 −15 [94]
2019  United States Tiger Woods (5) 275 −13 [95]
2020  United States Dustin Johnson 268 −20 [7]
2021  Japan Hideki Matsuyama 278 −10 [10]

Multiple champions[edit]

Masters Tournament multiple champions
Golfer Total Years
 Jack Nicklaus (USA) 6 1963, 1965, 1966, 1972, 1975, 1986
 Tiger Woods (USA) 5 1997, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2019
 Arnold Palmer (USA) 4 1958, 1960, 1962, 1964
 Jimmy Demaret (USA) 3 1940, 1947, 1950
 Sam Snead (USA) 3 1949, 1952, 1954
 Gary Player (RSA) 3 1961, 1974, 1978
 Nick Faldo (ENG) 3 1989, 1990, 1996
 Phil Mickelson (USA) 3 2004, 2006, 2010
 Horton Smith (USA) 2 1934, 1936
 Byron Nelson (USA) 2 1937, 1942
 Ben Hogan (USA) 2 1951, 1953
 Tom Watson (USA) 2 1977, 1981
 Seve Ballesteros (ESP) 2 1980, 1983
 Bernhard Langer (GER) 2 1985, 1993
 Ben Crenshaw (USA) 2 1984, 1995
 José María Olazábal (ESP) 2 1994, 1999
 Bubba Watson (USA) 2 2012, 2014

By nationality[edit]

Masters Tournament champions by nationality
Nationality Wins Winners
 United States 62 38
 Spain 5 3
 South Africa 5 3
 England 4 2
 Germany 2 1
 Scotland 1 1
 Wales 1 1
 Fiji 1 1
 Canada 1 1
 Argentina 1 1
 Australia 1 1
 Japan 1 1

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

General

  • "Masters Champions". Masters. Archived from the original on October 12, 2013. Retrieved August 19, 2011.

Specific

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External links[edit]