Morton County, North Dakota

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Morton County, North Dakota
Morton county north dakota courthouse 2009.jpg
Morton County Courthouse in Mandan
Map of North Dakota highlighting Morton County
Location in the U.S. state of North Dakota
Map of the United States highlighting North Dakota
North Dakota's location in the U.S.
Founded March 27, 1896
Seat Mandan
Largest city Mandan
Area
 • Total 1,945 sq mi (5,038 km2)
 • Land 1,926 sq mi (4,988 km2)
 • Water 19 sq mi (49 km2), 1.0%
Population (est.)
 • (2016) 30,809
 • Density 14/sq mi (5/km²)
Congressional district At-large
Website www.co.morton.nd.us

Morton County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Dakota. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,471,[1] making it the seventh-most populous county in North Dakota. Its county seat is Mandan.[2] The county was originally created in 1873 and later organized in 1878.[3][4]

Morton County is included in the Bismarck, ND, Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

The county was created by the 1872-1873 territorial legislature and named for Oliver Hazard Perry Throck Morton (1823-1877), governor of Indiana during the American Civil War and later a United States Senator. It was organized on March 23, 1878, but the action of the 1878 legislature in attaching the eastern portion to Burleigh County effectively nullified this action. The county was reorganized on February 18, 1881, after the detached portion had been returned to Morton County by the 1881 legislature. Mandan has always been the county seat, though during a period from 1878 to 1879, Mandan, and thus also the county seat, was known as Lincoln.[4][5]

On November 23, 1916, 1,666 square miles of southern and southwestern Morton County was detached to form Grant County.[6][7]

After the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) decided on the route in September 2014 to cross Morton County,[8] the county became a focus of DAPL protests in April 2016. In August 2016 the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) filed and injunction against United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to attempt to halt construction. In his 58-page decision by United States District Judge James E. Boasberg shows that the tribe failed to participate in the process of the USACE and Energy Transfer Partners (ETP) to address the tribes complaints. [9] Furthermore, the tribe never even mentions their fear of water contamination in the injunction. The injunction was denied and also failed on appeal. Amnesty International wrote a letter to Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier on September 28, 2016, requesting that he investigate the use of force by private contractors, remove blockades and discontinue the use of riot gear by Morton County sheriff's deputies when policing protests in order to facilitate the right to peaceful protests in accordance with international law and standards. [10] This letter was written in response to private security guards using guard dogs on advancing protesters on September 3, along with using pepper spray.[11] On November 20, North Dakota police officers fired rubber bullets, tear gas, CS canisters and water from fire hoses at rioting protesters in below freezing temperatures.[12]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,945 square miles (5,040 km2), of which 1,926 square miles (4,990 km2) is land and 19 square miles (49 km2) (1.0%) is water.[13]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 200
1890 4,728 2,264.0%
1900 8,069 70.7%
1910 25,289 213.4%
1920 18,714 −26.0%
1930 19,647 5.0%
1940 20,184 2.7%
1950 19,295 −4.4%
1960 20,992 8.8%
1970 20,310 −3.2%
1980 25,177 24.0%
1990 23,700 −5.9%
2000 25,303 6.8%
2010 27,471 8.6%
Est. 2016 30,809 [14] 12.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[15]
1790-1960[16] 1900-1990[17]
1990-2000[18] 2010-2016[1]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 25,303 people, 9,889 households, and 6,932 families residing in the county. The population density was 13 people per square mile (5/km²). There were 10,587 housing units at an average density of 6 per square mile (2/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.82% White, 0.16% Black or African American, 2.39% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.16% from other races, and 1.16% from two or more races. 0.65% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 64.5% were of German and 10.6% Norwegian ancestry.

There were 9,889 households out of which 34.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.20% were married couples living together, 8.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.90% were non-families. 25.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the county, the population was spread out with 27.00% under the age of 18, 7.80% from 18 to 24, 28.20% from 25 to 44, 22.40% from 45 to 64, and 14.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 99.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,028, and the median income for a family was $44,592. Males had a median income of $30,698 versus $21,301 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,202. About 6.80% of families and 9.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.00% of those under age 18 and 14.30% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 27,471 people, 11,289 households, and 7,523 families residing in the county.[19] The population density was 14.3 inhabitants per square mile (5.5/km2). There were 12,079 housing units at an average density of 6.3 per square mile (2.4/km2).[20] The racial makeup of the county was 93.6% white, 3.6% American Indian, 0.4% black or African American, 0.2% Asian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 0.4% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.5% of the population.[19] In terms of ancestry,[21]

Of the 11,289 households, 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.1% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.4% were non-families, and 27.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.90. The median age was 39.3 years.[19]

The median income for a household in the county was $50,591 and the median income for a family was $62,713. Males had a median income of $42,044 versus $31,505 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,303. About 5.4% of families and 8.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.8% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over.[22]

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Township[edit]

Census-designated place[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Politics[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[23]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 71.6% 11,336 19.5% 3,080 8.9% 1,416
2012 63.8% 8,680 32.8% 4,469 3.4% 464
2008 59.0% 7,869 38.1% 5,079 2.9% 391
2004 65.9% 8,325 32.2% 4,073 1.9% 235
2000 62.3% 6,993 30.6% 3,439 7.1% 791
1996 46.7% 4,699 37.2% 3,745 16.2% 1,626
1992 43.8% 5,042 31.2% 3,594 25.1% 2,886
1988 53.5% 5,588 45.1% 4,708 1.5% 151
1984 62.9% 7,146 35.2% 3,996 1.9% 214
1980 66.8% 7,659 25.0% 2,861 8.2% 938
1976 47.0% 4,921 50.1% 5,241 2.9% 300
1972 59.9% 5,494 36.1% 3,312 4.0% 371
1968 55.0% 4,465 38.9% 3,156 6.1% 494
1964 36.3% 2,955 63.6% 5,173 0.1% 10
1960 45.3% 4,028 54.7% 4,866 0.0% 1
1956 66.3% 5,232 33.3% 2,628 0.4% 30
1952 74.9% 6,309 24.7% 2,079 0.5% 38
1948 56.4% 3,607 39.4% 2,521 4.2% 266
1944 65.3% 3,537 34.2% 1,850 0.5% 28
1940 65.3% 5,499 34.3% 2,889 0.5% 40
1936 23.0% 1,857 69.4% 5,612 7.7% 621
1932 24.6% 1,828 74.7% 5,548 0.7% 54
1928 42.0% 2,881 57.6% 3,946 0.4% 26
1924 44.3% 2,377 4.9% 265 50.8% 2,728
1920 86.4% 4,618 11.8% 632 1.8% 97
1916 56.4% 2,785 37.1% 1,835 6.5% 322
1912 27.9% 1,011 28.1% 1,017 44.0% 1,590
1908 67.9% 2,021 29.3% 873 2.8% 82
1904 80.8% 1,474 17.6% 321 1.6% 30
1900 66.0% 1,056 33.5% 536 0.4% 7

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 1, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Dakota Territory, South Dakota, and North Dakota: Individual County Chronologies". Dakota Territory Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2006. Retrieved February 3, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b "County History". Official Portal for North Dakota State Government. Retrieved 4 May 2011. 
  5. ^ Wick, Douglas A. "Mandan (Morton County)". North Dakota Place Names. Retrieved 6 May 2011. 
  6. ^ Long, John H. (2006). "Dakota Territory, South Dakota, and North Dakota: Individual County Chronologies". Dakota Territory Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ Certification of the division of Morton County, ND 28 November 1916
  8. ^ Dalrymple, Amy (18 August 2016). "Pipeline route plan first called for crossing north of Bismarck". The Bismark Tribune. Archived from the original on 1 Nov 2016. Retrieved 23 September 2016. 
  9. ^ "Dakota Access Order | Sioux". Scribd. Retrieved 2017-01-24. 
  10. ^ http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/10/03/amnesty-international-morton-county-sheriff-investigate-use-force-against-protectors-dapl
  11. ^ http://www.democracynow.org/2016/9/4/dakota_access_pipeline_company_attacks_native
  12. ^ "400 DAPL protesters ‘trapped on bridge’ as police fire tear gas, water cannon (VIDEO)". RT International. Retrieved 2016-11-27. 
  13. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved February 1, 2015. 
  14. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  15. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 1, 2015. 
  16. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 1, 2015. 
  17. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (April 20, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 1, 2015. 
  18. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 1, 2015. 
  19. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-03-14. 
  20. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-03-14. 
  21. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-03-14. 
  22. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-03-14. 
  23. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS

[1]

External links[edit]

KML is from Wikidata

Coordinates: 46°43′N 101°17′W / 46.72°N 101.28°W / 46.72; -101.28

  1. ^ "Dakota Access Order | Sioux". Scribd. Retrieved 2017-01-24.