Network operating system

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The term network operating system is used to refer to two rather different concepts:

Network device operating systems[edit]

Network operating systems can be embedded in a router or hardware firewall that operates the functions in the network layer (layer 3).[2]

Historic network operating systems[edit]

Early microcomputer operating systems such as CP/M, DOS and classic Mac OS were designed for one user on one computer. As local area network technology became available, two general approaches to handle sharing arose.

Peer-to-peer[edit]

In a peer-to-peer network operating system users are allowed to share resources and files located on their computers and access shared resources from others. This system is not based with having a file server or centralized management source. A peer-to-peer network sets all connected computers equal; they all share the same abilities to use resources available on the network.[4]

The advantages include:

  • Ease of setup
  • Less hardware needed, no server need be acquired

The disadvantages include:

Client-server[edit]

Network operating systems can be based on a client–server model (architecture) in which a server enables multiple clients to share resources.[1] Client-server network operating systems allow networks to centralize functions and applications in one or more dedicated file servers. The server is the center of the system, allowing access to resources and instituting security. The network operating system provides the mechanism to integrate all the components on a network to allow multiple users to simultaneously share the same resources regardless of physical location.[4][5]

The advantages include:

  • Centralized servers are more stable.
  • Security is provided through the server.
  • New technology and hardware can be easily integrated into the system.
  • Hardware and the operating system can be specialized, with a focus on performance.
  • Servers are able to be accessed remotely from different locations and types of systems.

The disadvantages include:

  • Buying and running a server raises costs.
  • Dependence on a central location for operation.
  • Requires regular maintenance and updates.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Dean, Tamara (2009). "Network Operating Systems", Network+ Guide to Networks, 421(483)
  2. ^ Al-Shawakfa, Emad; Evens, Martha (2001). "The Dialoguer: An Interactive Bilingual Interface to a Network Operating System.", Expert Systems Vol. 18 Issue 3, p131, 19p, Retrieved 5/7/2011.
  3. ^ Kerner, Sean Michael (October 5, 2015) HP Launches OpenSwitch Linux Network Operating System. enterprisenetworkingplanet.com
  4. ^ a b Winkelman, Dr. Roy (2009). "Chapter 6: Software", An Educator's Guide to School Networks, 6.
  5. ^ Davis, Ziff (2011). "network operating system", PCmag.comRetrieved 5/7/2011.

External links[edit]