Ogdensburg, New Jersey

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Ogdensburg, New Jersey
Borough of Ogdensburg
Backwards Tunnel
Map of Ogdensburg in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County in New Jersey.
Map of Ogdensburg in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Ogdensburg, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Ogdensburg, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°04′48″N 74°35′51″W / 41.080091°N 74.597626°W / 41.080091; -74.597626Coordinates: 41°04′48″N 74°35′51″W / 41.080091°N 74.597626°W / 41.080091; -74.597626[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountySussex
IncorporatedMarch 31, 1914
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorSteven Ciasullo (R, term ends December 31, 2018)[3][4]
 • Municipal clerkPhyllis Drouin[5]
Area
 • Total2.329 sq mi (6.032 km2)
 • Land2.284 sq mi (5.914 km2)
 • Water0.045 sq mi (0.118 km2)  1.95%
Area rank385th of 566 in state
19th of 24 in county[1]
Elevation591 ft (180 m)
Population
 • Total2,410
 • Estimate 
(2016)[11]
2,294
 • Rank473rd of 566 in state
19th of 24 in county[12]
 • Density1,055.4/sq mi (407.5/km2)
 • Density rank376th of 566 in state
8th of 24 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP code
Area code(s)973 exchanges: 209, 823, 827[15]
FIPS code3403754660[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0885335[1][18]
Websitewww.ogdensburgnj.org

Ogdensburg is a borough in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 2,410[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 228 (-8.6%) from the 2,638 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 84 (–3.1%) from the 2,722 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

The borough was formed based on an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 26, 1914, from part of Sparta Township, subject to the results of a referendum held on March 31, 1914.[20] Ogdensburg is named after its first settler, Robert Ogden.[21][22]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Ogdensburg as its 27th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[23]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, Ogdensburg borough had a total area of 2.329 square miles (6.032 km2), including 2.284 square miles (5.914 km2) of land and 0.045 square miles (0.118 km2) of water (1.95%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Heaters Pond, South Ogdensburg and Sterling Hill.[24]

Ogdensburg borders the Sussex County municipalities of Franklin, Hardyston Township and Sparta Township.

Ogdensburgite, an arsenate mineral, was named after the borough.[25]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920939
19301,13821.2%
19401,1652.4%
19501,1690.3%
19601,2123.7%
19702,22283.3%
19802,73723.2%
19902,722−0.5%
20002,638−3.1%
20102,410−8.6%
Est. 20162,294[11][26]−4.8%
Population sources:
1920[27] 1920-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,410 people, 864 households, and 680.8 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,055.4 per square mile (407.5/km2). There were 905 housing units at an average density of 396.3 per square mile (153.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.23% (2,295) White, 0.33% (8) Black or African American, 0.04% (1) Native American, 1.83% (44) Asian, 0.17% (4) Pacific Islander, 1.00% (24) from other races, and 1.41% (34) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.27% (151) of the population.[8]

There were 864 households out of which 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.8% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.2% were non-families. 17.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.17.[8]

In the borough, the population was spread out with 24.5% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 30.7% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.6 years. For every 100 females there were 101.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 97.4 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $78,333 (with a margin of error of +/- $11,582) and the median family income was $87,656 (+/- $10,522). Males had a median income of $66,860 (+/- $3,252) versus $41,900 (+/- $6,659) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,447 (+/- $3,151). About 10.2% of families and 8.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.0% of those under age 18 and 14.0% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 2,638 people, 881 households, and 704 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,154.7 people per square mile (446.7/km2). There were 903 housing units at an average density of 395.3 per square mile (152.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.54% White, 0.15% African American, 0.04% Native American, 0.72% Asian, 0.27% from other races, and 1.29% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.17% of the population.[30][31]

There were 881 households out of which 43.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.6% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.0% were non-families. 16.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.99 and the average family size was 3.38.[30][31]

In the borough the population was spread out with 29.5% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 31.0% from 25 to 44, 23.9% from 45 to 64, and 8.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 102.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.9 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the borough was $60,313, and the median income for a family was $70,521. Males had a median income of $47,350 versus $35,060 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,305. About 4.8% of families and 5.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.6% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Ogdensburg is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The Borough form of government used by Ogdensburg, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[33][34]

As of 2016, the Mayor of Ogdensburg Borough is Republican Steve Ciasullo, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018. Members of the Ogdenburg Borough Council are Council President George P. Hutnick (R, 2018), David Astor (R, 2018), Robert J. McGuire (R, 2016), Peter G. Opilla (R, 2017), Regina Rizzo (R, 2016) and Rachel Slater (R, 2017).[3][35][36][37][38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Ogdensburg is located in the 11th Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[9][40][41] Prior to the 2010 Census, Ogdensburg had been part of the 5th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[42]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[44] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, 2019).[45][46]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Parker Space (R, Wantage Township) and Harold J. Wirths (R, Hardyston Township).[47][48] The Governor of New Jersey is Phil Murphy (D, Middletown Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Sheila Oliver (D, East Orange).[50]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[51] As of 2014, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2016),[52] Deputy Director Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015),[53] Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014),[54] George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2016)[55] and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015).[56][51] Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly.[57] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott (R, 2016),[58] Sheriff Michael F. Strada (R, 2016)[59] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons).[60][57] The County Administrator is John Eskilson.[61][62]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,634 registered voters in Ogdenburg, of which 311 (19.0% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 564 (34.5% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 757 (46.3% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[63] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 67.8% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 89.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[63][64]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 636 votes (56.4% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 463 votes (41.1% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 24 votes (2.1% vs. 2.1%), among the 1,127 ballots cast by the borough's 1,616 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.7% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[65] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 709 votes (57.5% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 483 votes (39.2% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 25 votes (2.0% vs. 1.5%), among the 1,233 ballots cast by the borough's 1,622 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.0% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[66] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 728 votes (64.3% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 378 votes (33.4% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 21 votes (1.9% vs. 1.3%), among the 1,132 ballots cast by the borough's 1,513 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.8% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[67]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 71.9% of the vote (520 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 25.9% (187 votes), and other candidates with 2.2% (16 votes), among the 731 ballots cast by the borough's 1,594 registered voters (8 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 45.9%.[68][69] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 491 votes (63.8% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 191 votes (24.8% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 71 votes (9.2% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 8 votes (1.0% vs. 1.3%), among the 770 ballots cast by the borough's 1,585 registered voters, yielding a 48.6% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[70]

Education[edit]

The Ogdensburg Borough School District serves students in public school for kindergarten through eighth grade at Ogdensburg School. As of the 2014-15 school year, the district and its one school had an enrollment of 387 students and 26.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.5:1.[71]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Wallkill Valley Regional High School which also serves students from Franklin Borough, Hardyston Township and Hamburg Borough, and is part of the Wallkill Valley Regional High School District.[72][73] As of the 2014-15 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 655 students and 57.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.4:1.[74]

Students can also attend Sussex County Technical School in Sparta Township, which is open to students from all of the county.[75]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 14.36 miles (23.11 km) of roadways, of which 12.63 miles (20.33 km) were maintained by the municipality and 1.73 miles (2.78 km) by Sussex County.[76]

Public transportation[edit]

The county provides Skylands Ride bus service operating between Sussex and Newton.[77]

Historic sites[edit]

Ogdensburg is home to the following locations on the National Register of Historic Places:

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Ogdensburg include:

  • Jason Davis (born 1974), record executive.[81]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Mayor and Council, Borough of Ogdensburg. Accessed August 2, 2016.
  4. ^ 2017 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 30, 2017.
  5. ^ Borough Hall Employees, Borough of Ogdensburg. Accessed August 2, 2016.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Ogdensburg, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Ogdensburg borough, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 2, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Ogdensburg borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed September 2, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016 - 2016 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 6, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Ogdensburg, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 2, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Ogdensburg, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 2, 2012.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed September 2, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 231. Accessed September 2, 2012.
  21. ^ Sussex County, New Jersey GenWeb. Accessed September 2, 2012.
  22. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 13, 2015.
  23. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100" Archived February 28, 2008, at the Wayback Machine., New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2008.
  24. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  25. ^ Ogdensburgite mineral information and data, mindat.org.
  26. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  27. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed February 24, 2013.
  29. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Ogdensburg borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 2, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Ogdensburg borough, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 2, 2012.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Ogdensburg borough, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 2, 2012.
  33. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask" Archived 2014-09-24 at the Wayback Machine., New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  34. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  35. ^ 2016 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Borough of Ogdensburg. Accessed August 2, 2016.
  36. ^ Sussex County General Election November 3, 2015 Summary Report Official Results, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 6, 2015. Accessed August 1, 2016.
  37. ^ Sussex County General Election November 4, 2014 Summary Report Official Results, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 10, 2014. Accessed August 1, 2016.
  38. ^ Sussex County General and School Election November 5, 2013 Summary Report Official Results, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 7, 2013. Accessed August 1, 2016.
  39. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2017 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 30, 2017.
  41. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 22, 2015.
  43. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  44. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  46. ^ Senators of the 114th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2018-2019 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 22, 2018.
  48. ^ District 24 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 22, 2018.
  49. ^ Governor Phil Murphy, State of New Jersey. Accessed January 16, 2018.
  50. ^ Lieutenant Governor Oliver, State of New Jersey. Accessed January 16, 2018. "Assemblywoman Oliver has resided in the City of East Orange for over 40 years."
  51. ^ a b Sussex County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  52. ^ Richard A. Vohden, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  53. ^ Dennis J. Mudrick, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  54. ^ Phillip R. Crabb, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  55. ^ George Graham, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  56. ^ Gail Phoebus, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  57. ^ a b Miller, Jennifer Jean. "George Graham Chosen as Freeholder at Sussex County Republican Convention", TheAlternativePress.com, April 13, 2013. Accessed April 25, 2013. "Graham will fill the freeholder seat that New Jersey Assemblyman Parker Space left to take his new position. Space recently took the seat, which formerly belonged to Gary Chiusano, who in turn, was appointed to the spot of Sussex County Surrogate, following the retirement of Surrogate Nancy Fitzgibbons."
  58. ^ Home Page, Sussex County Clerk's Office. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  59. ^ Sheriff's Office, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  60. ^ Home Page, Sussex County Surrogate. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  61. ^ County Administrator, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  62. ^ Sussex County Official Directory 2014, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  63. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Sussex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed February 24, 2013.
  64. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 24, 2013.
  65. ^ General Election November 6, 2012: District Report - Group Detail Archived June 6, 2013, at the Wayback Machine., Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 24, 2013.
  66. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2013.
  67. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed February 24, 2013.
  68. ^ "Governor - Sussex County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  69. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Sussex County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  70. ^ 2009 Governor: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed February 24, 2013.
  71. ^ District information for Ogdensburg Borough School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 7, 2016.
  72. ^ Home page, Wallkill Valley Regional High School. Accessed October 28, 2017. "We proudly serve the districts of: Franklin | Hamburg | Hardyston | Ogdensburg"
  73. ^ Jennings, Rob. "Wallkill Valley grad named superintendent/principal", New Jersey Herald, August 26, 2015. Accessed October 28, 2017. "Wallkill Valley Regional High School enrolls students from Hamburg, Hardyston, Ogdensburg and Franklin."
  74. ^ School data for Wallkill Valley Regional High School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 12, 2016.
  75. ^ Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), Sussex County Technical School. Accessed February 24, 2013. "Is Sussex County Technical School public schools? Absolutely. In New Jersey, county vocational-technical schools are a county-wide shared service funded by Boards of Chosen Freeholders and state and federal aid. Every student who lives in a county is eligible to apply for admission to their county-operate vocational-technical school."
  76. ^ Sussex County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  77. ^ Skylands Ride Route Map, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 9, 2015.
  78. ^ New Jersey - Sussex County, National Register of Historic Places. Accessed February 24, 2013.
  79. ^ A Brief History, Sterling Hill Mining Museum. Accessed February 24, 2013.
  80. ^ The Life of Thomas A. Edison. American Memory. Accessed September 24, 2011.
  81. ^ Davis, Jason; and Koczwara, Karen. Your Love Pursues: A Memoir, p. 10. Accessed June 26, 2018. BookBaby, 2013. ISBN 9781483537474. "I was born in Ogdensburg, New Jersey, a small rural town of 1,300 people."

Further reading[edit]

  • McCabe, Wayne T. and Kate Gordon. A Penny A View...An Album of Postcard Views...Ogdensburg, N.J. (Newton, NJ: Historic Preservation Alternatives, 1999).
  • Truran, William R. Franklin, Hamburg, Ogdensburg, and Hardyston (Images of America). (Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2004).
  • Truran, William R. Mining for America : the Franklin-Sterling Hill, N.J. Zinc; The Fluorescent Mineral Capital of the World. (Sparta, NJ: Trupower Press, 2006).

External links[edit]