Renzi Cabinet

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Renzi Cabinet
Flag of Italy.svg
63rd cabinet of Italy
Matteo Renzi crop 2015.jpeg
Date formed 22 February 2014
People and organisations
Head of government Matteo Renzi
Head of state Giorgio Napolitano
Sergio Mattarella
Number of ministers 16
Ministers removed
(Death/resignation/dismissal)
4
Total number of ministers 20
Member party Democratic Party (11)
New Centre-Right (3)
Union of the Centre (1)
Independents (2)
History
Election(s) The next general election must be held no later than 23 May 2018.
Predecessor Letta Cabinet

The Renzi Cabinet, led by Matteo Renzi, is the 63rd and current cabinet of the Italian Republic.

The government, in office since 22 February 2014, has been composed of members of the Democratic Party (PD), the New Centre-Right (NCD), the Union of the Centre (UdC), Civic Choice (SC), the Populars for Italy (PpI, until June 2015), Solidary Democracy (Demo.S, since July 2014), the Italian Socialist Party (PSI), Democratic Centre (CD, since October 2015) and non-party independents.[1]

At its formation, the Renzi Cabinet was the youngest government of Italy up to date, with an average age of forty-seven.[2] In addition, it was also the first Italian cabinet in which the number of female ministers was equal to the number of male ministers, not including the prime minister.[3][4] That has since changed as three female ministers have resigned and have been replaced by three male ministers.

History[edit]

Renzi's government during the oath.

At a meeting on 13 February 2014, following tensions between Prime Minister Enrico Letta and PD Secretary Matteo Renzi, the Democratic Party leadership voted heavily in favour of Renzi's call for "a new government, a new phase and a radical programme of reform". Minutes after the Party backed the Renzi proposal by 136 votes to 16, with two abstentions, Palazzo Chigi – the official residence of the Prime Minister – announced that Letta would travel to the Quirinale the following day to tender his resignation to President Giorgio Napolitano.[5]

In an earlier speech, Renzi had paid tribute to Letta, saying that he was not intended to put him "on trial". But, without directly proposing himself as the next Prime Minister, he said the Eurozone's third-largest economy urgently needed "a new phase" and "radical programme" to push through badly-needed reforms. The motion he put forward made clear "the necessity and urgency of opening a new phase with a new executive". Speaking privately to party leaders, Renzi said that Italy was "at a crossroads" and faced either holding fresh elections or a new government without a return to the polls.[6] On 14 February, President Napolitano accepted Letta's resignation from the office of Prime Minister.[7]

Following Letta's resignation, Renzi formally received the task of forming a new government from President Napolitano on 17 February.[8] Renzi held several days of talks with party leaders, all of which he broadcast live on the internet, before unveiling his cabinet on 21 February, which contained members of his Democratic Party, the New Centre-Right, the Union of the Centre and the Civic Choice. His Cabinet became Italy's youngest government to date, with an average age of 47.[9] It was also the first in which the number of female ministers was equal to the number of male ministers, excluding the Prime Minister.[3][10]

The following day Renzi was formally sworn in as Prime Minister, becoming the youngest Prime Minister in the history of Italy.[11] His rise to become Prime Minister was widely seen as a sign of much-needed generational change, and at the time he took office he enjoyed by far the highest approval rating of any politician in the country.[12]

On 25 February Renzi won a vote of confidence in the Italian Parliament, with 169 votes in the Senate and 378 in the Chamber of Deputies.[13]

On 20 March 2015, Prime Minister Renzi became ad interim Minister of Infrastructure and Transport after the resignation of Maurizio Lupi, due to a corruption scandal involving public works on infrastructure, in which his name was cited several times.[14] Renzi hold the office until 2 April, when Graziano Delrio was appointed as new minister.[15]

Investiture vote[edit]

25 February 2014
Investiture vote for Renzi Cabinet
House of Parliament Vote Parties Votes
Senate of the Republic YesY Yes PD (109), NCD (32), PSI-SVP (13), PI (10), SC (7), Others (5)
176 / 320
N No FI (59), M5S (40), LN (15), GAL (9), SEL (7), Others (14)
144 / 320
Chamber of Deputies YesY Yes PD (298), NCD (27), SC (27), PI (16), Others (20)
388 / 630
N No M5S (104), FI (70), SEL (25), LN (19), FdI (9), Others (15)
242 / 630

Party breakdown[edit]

Beginning of term[edit]

Ministers[edit]

9
3
1
1
3

Ministers and other members[edit]

Current breakdown[edit]

Ministers[edit]

11
3
1
2

Ministers and other members[edit]

Geographical breakdown[edit]

Beginning of term[edit]

Current breakdown[edit]

Composition[edit]

Current composition[edit]

Office Name Party Term
Prime Minister Matteo Renzi Democratic Party 2014–present
Minister of the Interior Angelino Alfano New Centre-Right 2014–present
Minister of Foreign Affairs Paolo Gentiloni Democratic Party 2014–present
Minister of Economy and Finances Pier Carlo Padoan Independent 2014–present
Minister of Defence Roberta Pinotti Democratic Party 2014–present
Minister of Justice Andrea Orlando Democratic Party 2014–present
Minister of Economic Development Carlo Calenda Democratic Party 2016–present
Minister of Labour Giuliano Poletti Independent 2014–present
Minister of Infrastructures and Transports Graziano Delrio Democratic Party 2015–present
Minister of Agriculture Maurizio Martina Democratic Party 2014–present
Minister of Education Stefania Giannini Democratic Party 2014–present
Minister of Health Beatrice Lorenzin New Centre-Right 2014–present
Minister of the Environment Gian Luca Galletti Union of the Centre 2014–present
Minister of Culture Dario Franceschini Democratic Party 2014–present
Minister of Regional Affairs Enrico Costa New Centre-Right 2016–present
Minister of Constitutional Affairs Maria Elena Boschi Democratic Party 2014–present
Minister of Public Administration Marianna Madia Democratic Party 2014–present

Detailed composition[edit]

Prime Minister[edit]

Office Name Term Party
Matteo Renzi crop 2015.jpeg
Prime Minister
Matteo Renzi
22 February 2014 – present
Democratic Party

Ministers[edit]

Office Name Term Party
Angelino Alfano daticamera.jpg
Minister of the Interior
Angelino Alfano
22 February 2014 – present
New Centre-Right
Federica Mogherini daticamera.jpg
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Federica Mogherini
22 February 2014 –
31 October 2014[16]
Democratic Party
Paolo Gentiloni Silveri daticamera.jpg
Paolo Gentiloni
31 October 2014 – present
Democratic Party
Pier Carlo Padoan crop.jpg
Minister of Economy and Finances
Pier Carlo Padoan
24 February 2014 – present
Independent
Roberta Pinotti Portrait.jpg
Minister of Defense
Roberta Pinotti
22 February 2014 – present
Democratic Party
Andrea Orlando daticamera.jpg
Minister of Justice
Andrea Orlando
22 February 2014 – present
Democratic Party
Federica Guidi crop.jpg
Minister of Economic Development
Federica Guidi
22 February 2014 – 5 April 2016[17]
Independent
Carlo Calenda crop.jpeg
Carlo Calenda
10 May 2016 – present
Democratic Party
Giuliano Poletti.jpg
Minister of Labour and Social Policies
Giuliano Poletti
22 February 2014 – present
Independent
Maurizio Enzo Lupi daticamera.jpg
Minister of Infrastructures and Transports
Maurizio Lupi
22 February 2014 – 20 March 2015[18]
New Centre-Right
Graziano Delrio.jpg
Graziano Delrio
2 April 2015 – present
Democratic Party
Maurizio Martina 2.jpg
Minister of Agriculture, Food and Forestry Policies
Maurizio Martina
22 February 2014 – present
Democratic Party
Stefania Giannini.jpg
Minister of Education, University and Research
Stefania Giannini
22 February 2014 – present
Civic Choice, later Democratic Party
Beatrice Lorenzin daticamera.jpg
Minister of Health
Beatrice Lorenzin
22 February 2014 – present
New Centre-Right
Gian Luca Galletti - Avaaz by Nicola Bertasi 02 (cropped).jpg
Minister of the Environment
Gian Luca Galletti
22 February 2014 – present
Union of the Centre
Dario Franceschini daticamera.jpg
Minister of Culture and Tourism
Dario Franceschini
22 February 2014 – present
Democratic Party
Maria Carmela Lanzetta.jpg
Minister of Regional Affairs and Autonomies
Maria Carmela Lanzetta
22 February 2014 – 26 January 2015[19]
Democratic Party
Enrico Costa daticamera.jpg
Enrico Costa
29 January 2016 – present
New Centre-Right
Maria Elena Boschi daticamera.jpg
Minister of Constitutional Reforms and Parliamentary Relations
Maria Elena Boschi
22 February 2014 – present
Democratic Party
Marianna Madia daticamera.jpg
Minister of Public Administration and Simplification
Marianna Madia
22 February 2014 – present
Democratic Party

Deputy Ministers[edit]

Office Name Term Party
No image.svg
Deputy Minister of the Interior
Filippo Bubbico
28 February 2014 – present
Democratic Party
Lapo Pistelli daticamera.jpg
Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs
Lapo Pistelli
28 February 2014 – 15 June 2015[20]
Democratic Party
No image.svg
Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs
Mario Giro
7 March 2016 – present
Solidary Democracy
Luigi Casero daticamera.jpg
Deputy Minister of Economy and Finance
Luigi Casero
28 February 2014 – present
New Centre-Right
Enrico Morando crop.jpg
Deputy Minister of Economy and Finances
Enrico Morando
28 February 2014 – present
Democratic Party
Enrico Zanetti daticamera.jpg
Deputy Minister of Economy and Finances
Enrico Zanetti
7 March 2016 – present
Civic Choice
Enrico Costa daticamera.jpg
Deputy Minister of Justice
Enrico Costa
28 February 2014 – 29 January 2016[21]
New Centre-Right
Carlo Calenda crop.jpeg
Deputy Minister of Economic Development
Carlo Calenda
28 February 2014 – 14 February 2014
Civic Choice, later Democratic Party
No image.svg
Deputy Minister of Economic Development
Claudio De Vincenti
28 February 2014 – 9 April 2015[22]
Democratic Party
Teresa Bellanova daticamera.jpg
Deputy Minister of Economic Development
Teresa Bellanova
7 March 2016 – present
Democratic Party
Riccardo Nencini 2.jpg
Deputy Minister to Infrastructures and Transports
Riccardo Nencini
28 February 2014 – present
Italian Socialist Party
Andrea Olivero - Trento - 2012 cropped.JPG
Deputy Minister of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies
Andrea Olivero
28 February 2014 – present
Populars for Italy, later Solidary Democracy

Secretary of the Council[edit]

Office Name Term Party
Graziano Delrio.jpg
Secretary of the Council of Ministers
Graziano Delrio
22 February 2014 – 2 April 2015[23]
Democratic Party
No image.svg
Claudio De Vincenti
10 April 2015 – present
Democratic Party

Chronology[edit]

February 2014[edit]

On 14 February 2014, the Italian Prime Minister Enrico Letta, taking note of the approval by a large majority by the Central Committee of the Democratic Party[24] of a proposal by the Democratic Party Secretary Renzi to give life to a new government, tendered his irrevocable resignation[25][26] to the President of the Italian Republic Giorgio Napolitano, who accepted it and gave life immediately to consultations with speakers of the House of Deputies and of the Senate, as well as with delegations of MPs for each political party. The Northern League Party and the Five Star Movement decide not to take part in such consultations.[27]

On 17 February 2014, the President of the Republic assigned the task of forming a new government to the Secretary of the Democratic Party Matteo Renzi, who reserved the right to accept,[28] also informing the Speakers of both Houses. On 18 February 2014 and 19 February 2014 the Prime Minister held consultations with the parliamentary groups of both Houses of Parliament.[29] On 21 February 2014, Matteo Renzi went to the President of the Republic and communicated his decision to become Prime Minister, presenting a list of 16 Ministers.

On 22 February 2014, Matteo Renzi and 15 ministers took the oath before the President of the Republic at the Quirinale Palace.[30] After the handover with the former Prime Minister Enrico Letta, Renzi presided over the first Cabinet Meeting, in which the Ministers without portfolio were assigned their briefs and Graziano Delrio was appointed Under-Secretary of State at the Prime Minister’s Office, as well as Cabinet Secretary.

On 24 February 2014, Prime Minister Renzi presented his Government’s program in the Senate and, after almost 11 hours of debate, his government obtained the Senate’s vote of confidence, with 169 voting in favor and 139 against. On 25 February 2014, the government also obtained the vote of confidence vote of the House of Deputies, with 378 votes in favour, 220 against and 1 abstention.

On 28 February 2014, the Italian Cabinet appointed forty four under-secretaries, who in the evening took the oath before Prime Minister Matteo Renzi.[31]

March 2014[edit]

On 3 March 2014, after several days of controversy, the new Under Secretary for Infrastructure and Transport, Antonio Gentile tendered his resignation.

On March 12, 2014, after two days of voting, the Chamber of Deputies approved in first reading the new electoral law Italicum with 365 votes in favour, 156 against and 40 abstentions. A number of controversies surrounded the failure to introduce preferential votes favouring gender equality.

On 12 March 2014, the Italian Cabinet issued a law- decree on fixed-term contracts, called the Poletti Decree, as well as a Bill proposing a reform on the Italian labor market called "Jobs Act"[32] A reduction in the tax burden of about €80 was announced for those earning less than 1500 Euros per month.

On 26 March 2014, despite the controversy raised by several parties belonging to the majority coalition, the government won a confidence vote in the Senate on the Delrio Bill reforming the provinces, with 160 voting in favour and 133 against. Subsequently also the Chamber of Deputies approved the Bill on 3 April 2014.

April 2014[edit]

On 18 April 2014, the Italian Cabinet approved a law-decree which provided for the reduction of Income Tax for employees and assimilated workers earning up to €24,000 gross per year. The net monthly salary was foreseen to increase by €80, through a tax credit from the month of May 2014.

On 30 April 2014, Matteo Renzi, together with the Minister for the Public Administration Marianna Madia, presented the guidelines for the reform of the Public Administration, subsequently approved by the Cabinet on 13 June 2014.

May 2014[edit]

On 6 May 2014, the Constitutional Affairs Committee of the Senate approved the Government’s Bill on the reform of the Italian Senate.[33]

On 8 May 2014, Prime Minister Matteo Renzi signed an agreement with Shanghai Electrics concerning Ansaldo.

On 21 May 2014, an agreement was signed between the Government, Sardinia Region and the Qatar Foundation to bring €1 billion investment and thousands of jobs to Sardinia.

On 22 May 2014, the Italian Cabinet of Ministers approved the Law-decree on culture for the preservation of the Italian historic, artistic and cultural heritage.

On 25 May 2014, the Democratic Party, which was the main supporter of the government and was also the party of the Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, won the 2014 European elections with 40.81% of the votes.

August 2014[edit]

On 1 August 2014, the Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi explained in a press conference the guidelines of Law-decree called "Sblocca Italia" or "Unlock Italy", which, in the intentions of the Government, is to facilitate the implementation of major projects, civil works and infrastructure that are currently suspended, as well as achieve further administrative simplification. A month of public consultations would take place in relation to such guidelines.

On 8 August 2014, the Italian Cabinet Cabinet approved a law-decree contrasting the phenomenon of lawlessness and violence at sporting events and provided for the international protection of migrants.

On 8 August 2014, the Senate approved the constitutional reform proposed by the government with 183 votes in favour, and 4 abstentions.[34]

On 8 August 2014, the two Houses of Parliament approved of the decrees on Competitiveness, Public Administration and Prisons, which become law.

On 29 August 2014, the Italian Cabinet approved the "Unblock Italy" Law-Decree and Justice Reform, dividing it into a Law-Decree for the disposal of the backlog in civil proceedings, and Law-Decrees relating to the fight against organized crime and illegal assets, the civil liability of judges, the efficiency of civil trials, as well as a comprehensive reform of the judiciary and a reform of Book XI of the Italian Code of criminal Procedure.

September 2014[edit]

On 1 September 2014, the Italian Prime Minister explained in a press conference that the site "passodopopasso.italia.it" would allow citizens to monitor the progress of the government’s program.

On 3 September 2014, the "Millegiorni" website provided guidelines on the reform of the school that will be subject to consultation for two months.

October 2014[edit]

On 8 October 2014, the Italian Senate approved the so-called Jobs Act, with 165 voting in favour and 111 against. The provision was criticized by the CGIL trade union and the Senators Felice Casson, Corradino Mineo and Lucrezia Ricchiuti , who did not take part in the vote.

On 8 October 2014, the Italian Prime Minister presented the Italian Finance Bill (or Legge di Stabilità). [35]

December 2014[edit]

Following approval of the Jobs Act by the Italian Parliament (Delegation Law No. 183 December 10, 2014), the Italian Cabinet issued on December 24, 2014, the first legislative decree concerning contracts with growing protection. [36]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Backgrounder: Italy's new cabinet lineup". Xinhua News Agency. 22 February 2014. Retrieved 22 February 2014. 
  2. ^ "Renzi: con 47, 8 anni di media, è il governo più giovane di sempre". Corriere Della Sera. 21 February 2014. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "Matteo Renzi presenta il governo: "Metà sono donne, mi gioco la faccia"". TGCOM24. 21 February 2014. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  4. ^ "Matteo Renzi unveils a new Italian government with familiar problems". Guardian. 22 February 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2014. 
  5. ^ Letta al Quirinale, si è dimesso
  6. ^ Lizzy Davies in Rome. "Italian PM Enrico Letta to resign". theguardian.com. Retrieved 13 February 2014. 
  7. ^ Правительственный кризис в Италии: премьер Летта ушел в отставку (in Russian). RIA Novosti. 14 February 2014. Retrieved 14 February 2014. 
  8. ^ "39 Year Old Matteo Renzi becomes, at 39, Youngest Italian Prime Minister". IANS. news.biharprabha.com. Retrieved 17 February 2014. 
  9. ^ "Renzi: con 47, 8 anni di media, è il governo più giovane di sempre". Corriere Della Sera. 21 February 2014. Retrieved 23 February 2014. 
  10. ^ "Matteo Renzi unveils a new Italian government with familiar problems". Guardian. 22 February 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2014. 
  11. ^ "Matteo Renzi sworn in as Italy's new PM in Rome ceremony". BBC. 22 February 2014. Retrieved 26 February 2014. 
  12. ^ "Sondaggi, Matteo Renzi non-fa boom" (in Italian). Giornalettismo.com. 20 January 2014. Retrieved 22 February 2014. 
  13. ^ "Renzi alla Camera: abbiamo un'unica chance Passa la fiducia con 378 sì e 220 no". Corriere della Sera. Retrieved 7 June 2015. 
  14. ^ Italian Infrastructure Minister Maurizio Lupi Will Resign
  15. ^ Graziano Delrio ministro delle Infrastrutture, ha giurato al Quirinale
  16. ^ Mogherini was appointed High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy in the Juncker Commission.
  17. ^ Federica Guidi resigned amid allegations that she had sought to shape last year’s budget law to favour an oil project from which her partner, who was inquired, stood to benefit financially.
  18. ^ Lupi resigned following a corruption scandal involving public works on infrastructure, in which his name was cited several times.
  19. ^ Lanzetta accepted the appointment as regional assessor in the cabinet of Mario Oliverio, President of Calabria.
  20. ^ Pistelli was appointed Vice-President of Eni.
  21. ^ Costa was appointed Minister of Regional Affairs and Autonomies
  22. ^ De Vincenti was appointed Secretary of the Council.
  23. ^ Delrio sworn in as Minister of Infrastructure and Transport
  24. ^ "Apriamo una fase nuova,". Partito Democratico. Retrieved 8 March 2014. 
  25. ^ "il Presidente Napolitano ha ricevuto il Presidente del Consiglio dei Ministri, Letta,". Presidenza della Repubblica Italiana. Retrieved 8 March 2014. 
  26. ^ "Enrico Letta si è dimesso,". Presidenza del Consiglio dei ministri. Retrieved 8 March 2014. 
  27. ^ "Salvini, Lega domani non andrà a consultazioni,". Lega Nord. Retrieved 8 March 2014. 
  28. ^ "Il M5S non va alle consultazioni farsa di Napolitano,". Movimento 5 Stelle. Retrieved 28 February 2014. 
  29. ^ "Camera, Laura Boldrini riceve Matteo Renzi,". Camera dei Deputati. Retrieved 17 February 2014. 
  30. ^ "Al via le consultazioni di Renzi. Ecco il calendario,". ASCA. Retrieved 18 February 2014. 
  31. ^ Di ritorno dall'estero, giurerà due giorni più tardi, Retrieved 8 March 2014[better source needed]
  32. ^ "The Jobs Act arrives at Italian Senate". TheRword September Editorial. Retrieved 21 October 2014. 
  33. ^ "The Senate Reform,". TheRword October Editorial. Retrieved 22 October 2014. 
  34. ^ "The Senate Reform,". TheRword October Editorial. Retrieved 22 October 2014. 
  35. ^ "The New Legge di Stabilità 2015,". TheRword News. Retrieved 22 October 2014. 
  36. ^ "A detailed explanation of the Legislative Decree on Increasing Protection Employment Contracts,". TheRword Editorial. Retrieved 28 December 2014. 

External links[edit]