San Francisco Municipal Railway fleet

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
A Siemens LRV4 train on Muni Metro

With five different modes of transport from many different vendors, the San Francisco Municipal Railway or Muni as it is commonly known, runs one of the most diverse fleets of vehicles in the United States. Roughly 800 buses (500 diesel buses and 300 trolleybuses), 200 streetcars and 40 cable cars see active duty. Muni's cable cars constitute the oldest and largest such system remaining in service in the world and is the only one still running with manually operated cars in street traffic. Its fleet of electric trolleybuses is the largest in the United States. The 30- and 40-ft diesel/hybrid buses are numbered in the 8000 series, the 60-ft articulated diesel/hybrid buses in the 6000 series, the 40-ft trolleybuses in the 5000 series, the 60-ft articulated trolleybuses in the 7000 series, and the streetcars in the 1000 and 2000 series. Muni is in the process of replacing its motor coach fleet - the first of which was procured in 1915[1] - with diesel-electric hybrid buses. A summary of the current and historic vehicles follows.

Summary[edit]

Current fleet[edit]

All buses are accessible at all stops. All streetcars are accessible; however, some surface stops on the E and F lines, and many Muni Metro surface stops, are not accessible. Cable cars are not accessible.

Model Fleet Series (Year Built)
Quantity[2]
Division Image Notes
Neoplan AN440 (40 ft. High Floor Diesel Bus) 8101 (1999)
8102-8235 (2000)
8301-8371 (2002)
206 buses
Kirkland, Woods (reserve fleet), Islais Creek (reserve fleet) Muni route 22 bus, June 2012.jpg 34 buses were rebuilt in 2010-2011, and 80 more rebuilt in 2013.[3][4]
Being retired, although some units used as reserve / training buses.
Orion Bus VII (40 ft. Low Floor Diesel-electric Hybrid Bus) 8401 (2006)
8402-8456 (2007)
56 buses
Woods MUNI 8406.JPG
Orion Bus VII (30 ft. Low Floor Diesel-electric Hybrid Bus) 8501-8530 (2007)
30 buses
Woods Muni route 37 bus in Cole Valley, February 2018.jpg
New Flyer Industries XDE60 (60 ft. Articulated Low Floor Diesel-electric Hybrid Bus) 6500-6554 (2015)
6560-6697 (2015-2018)
6700-6730 (2015-2016)
224 buses
Flynn, Islais Creek Muni route 49 bus on Ocean Avenue, January 2018.JPG
New Flyer Industries XDE40 (40 ft. Low Floor Diesel-electric Hybrid Bus)[5] 8601-8662, 8701-8750 (2013)
8751-8780 (2017)
8800-8969 (2016-)
312 buses
Woods, Kirkland MUNI 8630.JPG
ETI 14TrSF (40 ft. High Floor Trolleybus) 5401-5402 (1999)
5403-5640 (2001-2004)
240 buses
Presidio, Potrero MUNI 5589.JPG To be replaced by XT40 fleet.
New Flyer Industries XT40 (40 ft. Low Floor Trolleybus) 5701-5885 (2018-2019)
185 buses[6]
Presidio, Potrero Muni 5713 testing on Ashbury Heights, June 2018.jpg The first coach, 5701, arrived in February 2018.[7] 5702 arrived in April 2018. Will replace the ETI 14TrSF fleet by 2019.[7]
New Flyer Industries XT60 (60 ft. Articulated Low Floor Trolleybus) 7201-7293 (2015-2018)
93 buses
Potrero Muni 7201 on first day of service, August 2015.jpg Option for the final 33 units exercised in July 2016[8]
Breda LRV2 (1400-1476),
Breda LRV3 (1477-1550)[9] (High floor Light-Rail Vehicle)
1400-1535 (1996-2001),
1536-1550 (2003)
151 streetcars[10]
Green, Muni Metro East T Third Islais.jpg Two units retired.
Siemens S200 LRV4 (High floor Light-Rail Vehicle) 2001-2215 (2016-2028)
24 streetcars (plus up to 236 option)
Green, Muni Metro East, Cameron Beach Yard Muni 2008 crossing Church Street, January 2018.JPG
PCC (High floor historic streetcar) 1006-1011, 1015, 1040,
1050-1053, 1054, 1055-1063,
1070-1080 (1946-1952)
32 streetcars [11]
Cameron Beach Yard SF 1062 Louisville Railway Company.JPG 33 units were acquired by Muni, but 1 were retired.
1055-1063 were purchased from SEPTA.
1070-1080 were purchased from NJ Transit.
Additional units were in storage.
Peter Witt (High floor historic streetcar) 1807, 1811, 1814-1815, 1818, 1834, 1856, 1859, 1888, 1893, 1895 (1928)
11 streetcars[11]
Cameron Beach Yard Muni 1893 at Embarcadero and Bay, March 2011.jpg
Various (High floor historic streetcar) (1912-)
7 streetcars[11]
Cameron Beach Yard
Various (High floor historic streetcar) (Unknown)
N/A[11]
Various
Various (High floor cable car) Powell: 1-28
California: 49-60
(1873-)
40 cable cars
Cable Car San Francisco cable car no. 58 on California St. 1.JPG

Historical bus fleet[edit]

The following shows the buses previously operated by the SFMTA. Some of these coaches have been preserved in the historic fleet, donated to trolley museums, or auctioned.

Model Fleet Numbers (Year Built) Preserved Unit(s) Quantity Last retired Image Notes
Neoplan AN460 6200-6225 (2000),
6226-6299 (2001),
6401-6424 (2002)
None 124 2018 MUNI 6413.JPG Some units were rebuilt in 2010-2011.
NABI 416.12 8001-8045 (1999) None 45 2016 MUNI 8041.JPG
ETI 15TrSF 7101 (2000),
7102-7133 (2003)
None 33 2016 SF Muni ETI 15TrSF 7108.jpg
New Flyer Industries E60 7000-7059 (1992-1994) 7031 60 2015 MUNI New Flyer 7030 Mission.jpg First 60-foot articulated trolleybus fleet.
New Flyer Industries D60 9101-9124 (1990-1991) 9120 24 2014 Muni-Bus-Market-street-San-Francisco.jpg
Gillig Corporation Phantom 40' 2801–2845 (1993) 2840 (training only) 45 2013[12] MUNI 2805.JPG Bought from AC Transit in 2005 for reserve fleet.

2840 was preserved by Muni, but it was later used as training fleet starting in April 2018.

Orion Bus Industries I Citycruiser 9001-9045 (1990) 9010 45 2008 San Francisco Muni Orion I 35 Eureka.jpg 9030 was converted to Mobile Commander Center CC1.
New Flyer Industries D40 8801-8850 (1988),
8901-8956 (1989)
8926 106 2007 ANewFlyerBusOn12FolsomRoute.jpg
Flyer Industries E800 5003-5345 (1976-1977) 5300, 5345 343 2007 Ad-free Muni Flyer E800 trolley bus in 1983, on Mariposa St by Potrero Garage.jpg 5148 is at Seashore Trolley Museum.
Flyer Industries D902 4500-4679 (1984) 4574 180 2003 AFlyerD902CopBusInSanFranciscoParkedThere.jpg 4574 was damaged while being delivered. A second 4574 was built as a Flyer D901 and delivered in its place.
MAN AG SG-310-18-3A 6000-6099 (1984) 6099 100 2002 Former Muni bus in Fernley, Nevada, September 2016.jpg First 60-ft articulated bus.
6020 and 6090 are under private ownership and are commonly seen at Burning Man.[13]
Flyer D900 3XXR, 6XXR (1980) None 110 2000 Bought from SamTrans in 1994; reserve fleet only.
Flyer E700A 5001 (1972),
5002 (1973)
None 2 1999 Pilot buses
GM New Look 3000-3389 (1969-1970) 3287 390 1994 Muni 3287 during Heritage Weekend, September 2017.JPG 3000, 3210, 3226, and others are under private ownership. 3270 is preserved at the Pacific Bus Museum.
Flxible New Look 4000-4009 (1969) 4009 10 1991[1]
AM General 9635-6 4100-4199 (1975) 4154 100 1990 Muni 4154 at Heritage Weekend, September 2017.JPG
Grumman 870 4030-4054 (1980) None 25 1985[1] Most were scrapped around 1986, though some remained as reserve buses until 1989.
Twin Coach 44TTW 570-659 (1949-1950) None 90 1977[1]
St. Louis Car Company Job 1704/Job 1731 501-509 (1939),
510-525 (1947)
506 25 1977[1] San Francisco Muni St Louis-built trolleybus 506 on display in 2012.jpg
Marmon-Herrington TC40 526-549 (1948) None 25 1977[1]
Marmon-Herrington TC44 550–569, 660–710 (1948-1949) None 70 1977[1] 559 was originally sued on the Dayton, Ohio, trolleybus system.
Marmon-Herrington TC48 711–849 (1950-1951) 776 139 1977[1] Muni 776 at Heritage Weekend (2), September 2017.JPG
White 784 042-062 (1938) 042, 060 20 1975[1] Muni 042 on display at Heritage Weekend, September 2017.JPG 060 was bought by a private owner.
Mack C-49-DT 2100-2199 (1955),
2200-2269 (1956),
2300-2369 (1957),
2400-2469 (1958),
2500-2569 (1959),
2600-2669 (1960)
2230 450 1974[1] Muni 2230 on display at Heritage Weekend, September 2017.JPG 2617 was bought by a private owner.
White 798 075-0155,
0166-0454 (1944-1948)
0392, 0419 368 1969
Twin Coach 44-D 0156-0165 (1947) 0163 10 1953[1]
ACF 26-S 063–072 (1940) None 10

Divisions[edit]

Division Opened Number of Vehicles Vehicle Type Location Image Notes
Presidio Division 1912 ~165 40-foot trolleybuses Bush and Presidio Trolleybuses at Presidio Division from Masonic Avenue, November 2017.JPG The first yard built for Muni, originally used for the Geary streetcar lines
Potrero Division 1914 ~170 40-foot and 60-foot trolleybuses 17th & Bryant Trolley coaches at Potrero Division, January 2018.JPG
Woods Division 1975 ~200 30-foot and 40-foot hybrid buses 22nd & Indiana Muni 8417 on a lift at Woods Division, July 2017.JPG
Flynn Division 1980s 124 60-foot hybrid buses 15th & Harrison Muni Flynn Division from 16th Street, January 2018.jpg
Kirkland Division 1950 ~135 40-foot diesel and hybrid buses Powell & Beach Kirkland Division from pedestrian bridge, June 2017.JPG
Balboa Park complex 1901 (rebuilt 1970s) ~200 LRVs and historic streetcars San Jose & Geneva Cameron Beach Yard from Geneva Avenue, January 2018.JPG Includes Green Division, Geneva Division, and the closed Geneva Upper Yard. Geneva Division was renamed Cameron Beach Yard in 2011.[14]
Muni Metro East 2008 80-100 LRVs and historic streetcars Cesar Chavez & Illinois Pit track at Muni Metro East, August 2014.jpg
Cable Car 1890s 50 Cable cars Washington & Mason San Francisco Cable Car Museum - San Francisco, CA - DSC02375.jpg Includes the San Francisco Cable Car Museum
David Pharr Restoration Facility 1982 Duboce and Buchanan 1006 Duboce june 1980cr - Flickr - drewj1946.jpg Small outdoor yard used for restoration work and to temporarily store Muni Metro trains. Pharr was a self-taught volunteer with Market Street Railway.[15][16]
Marin 1982 Marin & Indiana Retired cable cars at Marin Division, June 2018.JPG Used for long-term storage of disused streetcars, cable cars, and buses
Islais Creek 2013 165-185 40-foot and 60-foot diesel buses Marin & Indiana Islais Creek Division from Indiana Street, June 2018.JPG Originally an open storage yard, it was replaced with an enclosed building in 2017. The $127 million facility, intended to replace the aging Kirkland Yard, has attracted local criticism. It was promised to include a public meeting room, a publicly-accessible lobby with historical exhibits, and a shoreline park with signage; however, the lobby was dropped for the plans and funding was not allocated for the signage.[17]


Muni Yards and Divisions
1
Presidio (1912)
2
Potrero (1914)
3
Woods (1975)
4
Flynn (1980s)
5
Kirkland (1950)
6
Balboa Park (Cameron Beach/Green Yard) (1901)
7
Muni Metro East (2008)
8
Cable Car (1890s)
9
David Pharr (1982)
10
Marin & Islais Creek (1982, 2017)

Buses[edit]

Diesel buses[edit]

Muni's active diesel fleet contains coaches ranging from thirty to sixty feet in length. For the last complete fleet replacement cycle Muni bought from three manufacturers, NABI, Neoplan and Orion, all of whom no longer sell buses in the U.S. (NABI has merged into New Flyer, Neoplan has left the North American market, and Daimler has shut down Orion). Muni has since purchased 40 ft. and 60 ft. buses from New Flyer with options to replace the remainder of the fleet in those sizes.

All of Muni's current active diesel buses have met ADA standards since 1980. In 1984, Muni received its first 60-foot (18 m) articulated buses, which are used on high-ridership routes. In December 2007, Muni acquired a double-decker diesel bus for testing purposes, but did not purchase a revenue fleet.[18] Muni fuels its diesels with a B20 (20% bio, 80% diesel) bio-diesel blend.

Hybrid-electric diesel buses[edit]

Since 2007 Muni's new diesel bus purchases have been for diesel-electric hybrids. Because of their electric motor propulsion these buses can climb hills just as well as trolleybuses without being limited to the overhead grid. Hybrids are also known for averaging more miles between road calls - which is where a mechanic services a transit vehicle on the street[19] - than standard diesels.[20] One of the vehicles was briefly outfitted with wireless internet as a demonstration project.[21] In addition, these vehicles were not operated on the 44-O'Shaughnessy and the 54-Felton routes for several months as vandals consistently flipped a battery switch towards the back of the vehicle, disabling the bus.[22] From 2015 to 2020, the agency plans to replace its entire motor coach fleet with hybrid buses[23]

Battery-electric buses[edit]

In 2018, the SFMTA Board voted to only purchase all-electric buses beginning in 2025, with the last non-electric buses retired by 2035. Muni had no previously bought battery-electric buses because they had not been proven on steep hills and on high-ridership routes. A small number of electric buses will be tested in 2019.[24]

Electric trolleybuses[edit]

Potrero Garage scene showing a range of Muni trolley buses spanning from 1976 to 2003. On the left is an ETI (Skoda/AAI) 14TrSF trolleybus, which type replaced the non-accessible Flyer trolleybuses in the center. On the right is an articulated New Flyer trolleybus, one of 60 articulated ETBs built by New Flyer for Muni in 1993-94.

Muni's fleet of electric trolleybuses (ETBs) is the largest in the nation[25] and serves many parts of the city. ETBs were very popular in the United States in the middle of the 20th century. Today, San Francisco is one of only five cities in the United States with an operational ETB fleet,[25][26] but they play a major role in the Muni system, in part because of the city's many steep hills. Although their overhead wires are sometimes considered unsightly, ETBs are able to climb grades much steeper than conventional, non-cable streetcars and are quieter (particularly when climbing hills) and cleaner than diesel- or hybrid buses. The steepest grade on the Muni trolleybus system, 22.8% in the block of Noe Street between Cesar Chavez Street and 26th Street on route 24-Divisadero,[27] is the steepest grade on any existing trolleybus line in the world,[28][29][30] and several other sections of Muni ETB routes are among the world's steepest.[31] Muni has operated trolleybuses since 1941 and the mode has been present in San Francisco since 1935—initially a line built and operated by the Market Street Railway and later taken over by Muni.[25] Conversion of some existing diesel bus lines has been proposed.

In 1992, Muni tested its first 60-ft articulated trolleybus, the first in the trolleybus fleet to have a wheelchair lift, which were used on high-ridership trolleybus routes. The buses started service in 1993.

Muni's active ETB fleet consists of articulated coaches from New Flyer and Electric Transit, Inc. (ETI) (Skoda/AAI), as well as standard 40 ft coaches from ETI. Historically, Muni ran ETBs from Brill, the St. Louis Car Company, Twin Coach, Marmon-Herrington and Flyer.[32]

Cable cars[edit]

Around the turn of the twentieth century, there were numerous cable car lines providing service to many sections of the city. Some of those cable cars are built by Muni themselves.[33] Currently only three lines and forty cars remain.

Streetcars[edit]

Contemporary light rail vehicles[edit]

The Muni Metro has run two types of light rail vehicles. Originally, Boeing-Vertol cars, which Muni designated LRV1, were used. However, these proved to be extremely troublesome and were phased out of service beginning in 1997. The Boeing cars were replaced by Italian-built Breda LRV2 and LRV3 models. Initially, the Breda vehicles were hailed as more reliable and easier to service than their predecessors. However, deferred maintenance and design defects have taken their toll on them.

Muni is now looking to replace the Bredas and expand its fleet with new Siemens light rail vehicles. The first batch of 24 Siemens S200 LRV4s will be delivered by 2018, ahead of the scheduled opening of the Central Subway in 2019. SFMTA's contract with Siemens calls for a total of 260 cars to be delivered.[34] The first LRV4 went into revenue service on November 17, 2017.[35]

Signs are changing into "T" when the train steps up and reaches into West Portal Station.

Historic streetcars[edit]

Historic streetcars are run on the F Market & Wharves line. Introduced as a regular, year-round service in 1995, the F-line heritage streetcar service started out 12 years earlier as a temporary, replacement tourist attraction for the cable cars, during an almost two-year suspension (1982–84) of all cable-car service to permit major infrastructure maintenance to take place. The F line fleet is composed mostly of PCC cars bought second hand from Philadelphia and New Jersey. The cars are painted in liveries from cities around the world, as well as 1920s-vintage Peter Witt cars from Milan. In addition, Muni operates streetcars from around the world which were bought or donated to Muni. The vintage fleet is looked over by Market Street Railway but owned and operated by Muni.

Active PCC fleet[edit]

First batch (overhauled by Morrison-Knudsen)[edit]

This shows the active PCCs entering service 1995 or before. Most are single-ended; cars 1007, 1010, and 1015 are double-ended "Torpedo" cars. All of these cars were rehabilitated by Morrison-Knudsen before entering revenue service. Car 1054 (original 2121) was damaged beyond repair following an accident on November 16, 2003 and it is stored awaiting scrapping.[36][37][38]

In 2014, Muni sent 1056, the first from the original batch of sixteen to be overhauled at Brookville Equipment Company.[39] The entire first batch of sixteen is scheduled to be rebuilt at Brookville; the next cars to be sent were 1051, 1060, and 1059 in that order;[40][41] followed (in indeterminate order) by 1055, 1062, and 1063.[42] The first streetcar to re-enter service, 1051, was re-dedicated to Harvey Milk in March 2017, and was followed back into service by 1056.[43]

PCC # City/System Represented Current Status Notes Image
1007 Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Company Out of service Built in 1948 for Muni. Retired in 1982 and stored until 1994. Restored in 1995. Previously painted in Muni's Breda LRV livery; repainted into the present livery in 1997. San Francisco Streetcar 1007.jpg
1010 San Francisco Municipal Railway
(1939 livery)
Out of service Built in 1948 for Muni. Retired in 1982 and stored until 1994. Restored in 1996. Undergoing restoration at Brookville. SF 1010 San Francisco.jpg
1015 Illinois Terminal Railroad Out of service Built in 1948 for Muni. Retired in 1982 and stored until 1994. Restored in 1995. Undergoing restoration at Brookville. San Francisco F line streetcars at Jones.jpg
1050 St. Louis Public Service Company
(1950 livery)
In service Built in 1948 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2119. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995 bearing legacy San Francisco "Wings" livery (1951). Went for rebuild in late 2016. 1050 was repainted into a tribute livery for Saint Louis. Streetcar 1050 on Market, Oct 2018 (44345316254).jpg
1051 San Francisco Municipal Railway
(1963 livery)
In service Built in 1948 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2123. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995. Dedicated for Supervisor Harvey Milk in 2008, later appearing in the film Milk.[44][45][46] Sent to Brookville for rebuild; returned in 2016[42] and re-entered service in 2017.[43] Muni 1051 at Second Street, October 2017.jpg
1052 Los Angeles Railway
(1937 livery)
In service Built in 1948 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2110. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995. 1052 Streetcar (8465333833).jpg
1053 NYC Board of Transportation
(Brooklyn, NY)
In service Built in 1947 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2721. Originally configured with a separate conductor's booth until 1955. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995. Rebuilt Brookville (2018).[47] Heritage Streetcar 1053 SFO 04 2015 2445.JPG
1055 Philadelphia Transportation Company
(1947 livery)
In service Built in 1948 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2122. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995. Rebuilt Brookville (2017),[42] repainted to as-delivered Philadelphia livery.[48][49] Muni 1055 entering the Transbay Terminal, September 1998.jpg
1056 Kansas City Public Service Company In service Built in 1948 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2113. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995. Out of service after a cracked bolster was discovered in 2011;[39][50] rebuilt by Brookville and returned to Muni in 2016,[51] re-entered service in 2017.[43] SF 1056 Kansas City Public Service.jpg
1057 Cincinnati Street Railway Out of service Built in 1948 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2138. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995. Undergoing restoration at Brookville. San Francisco Muni 1057.jpg
1058 Chicago Transit Authority Out of service Built in 1948 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2124. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995. Previously painted in CTA's 1950s green and cream livery; repainted into the 1940s "Green Hornet" livery in 2010 after accident repairs. Undergoing restoration at Brookville. SF 1058 Green Hornet Livery.jpg
1059 Boston Elevated Railway In service Built in 1948 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2099. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995. Rebuilt Brookville (2017);[42] returned with accurate colors.[49][52] Muni 1059 leaving Jefferson and Taylor, October 2017.jpg
1060 Philadelphia Transportation Company
(1938 livery)
In service Built in 1947 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2715. Originally configured with a separate conductor's booth until 1955. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995. Previously painted in Newark, NJ's Public Service Coordinated Transport livery; repainted into the present livery (previously worn by retired 1054) in 2005 after accident repairs. Rebuilt Brookville (2017).[42][53] San Francisco (14342380825).jpg
1061 Pacific Electric Out of service Built in 1948 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2116. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995. At Brookville for rebuild.[49][53] Pacific Electric 1061 in SFO 12-28-04b.JPG
1062 Pittsburgh Railways In service Built in 1948 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2101. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995 with Louisville Railway livery. Rebuilt Brookville (2017);[42] returned with Pittsburgh livery.[54][52] Streetcar 1062 (38849224352).jpg
1063 Baltimore Transit Company Out of service Built in 1948 for Philadelphia Transportation Company (later SEPTA) as 2096. Acquired by Muni in 1992 and re-entered service in 1995. Rebuilt by Brookville in 2017 and returned with alternate and more accurate Baltimore livery. It was damaged in a collision with a truck in January 2018, shortly after returning to revenue service.[55] PCC car in San Francisco.jpg

[11][56]

Second batch (overhauled by Brookville Equipment Company)[edit]

All of these cars were purchased by Twin Cities Rapid Transit in 1946. They were sold to Newark in 1953 and ran on the Newark City Subway until replacement by modern light rail vehicles in 2001. The San Francisco Municipal Railway acquired these cars in 2004 and had the cars overhauled at Brookville Equipment Company. Some of the cars were put in service in early 2007, but were taken out of service for wiring problems. These problems were eventually repaired. All these cars are single-end cars.

PCC # City/System Represented Current Status Notes Image
1070 Newark City Subway In service San Francisco Muni 1070.jpg
1071 Twin City Rapid Transit In service San Francisco PCC car 1071, Minneapolis livery (2011).jpg
1072 Mexico City (STE) In service San Francisco Muni 1072.JPG
1073 El Paso-Juarez In service Vintage Streetcar 1073 SFO 04 2015 2434.JPG
1074 Toronto Transit Commission In service Old school trolly on Market Street (7358450240).jpg
1075 Cleveland Transit System In service San Francisco Muni 1075.jpg
1076 Washington, DC Out of service San Francisco PCC car 1076, Washington DC livery.jpg
1077 Birmingham, Alabama In service San Francisco PCC streetcar 1077, Birmingham livery.jpg
1078 San Diego In service Muni 1078 on The Embarcadero, June 2017.JPG
1079 Detroit, Michigan In service Muni 1079 on Market Street, October 2017.jpg
1080 Los Angeles (National City Lines) In service Heritage Streetcar 1080 SFO 04 2015 2440.JPG
Third batch of rehabilitated San Francisco PCC cars[edit]

The following shows cars acquired by Muni in 1948 and 1952 that were restored or are in restoration and are either in service or will enter service within the next year. Car 1040 was restored in this batch and is the last PCC car ever built in North America.

PCC # City/System Represented Status Notes Image
1006 San Francisco (wings) In service This car was purchased in 1948 and ran in San Francisco until retirement in 1987. Underwent restoration at Brookville Equipment. Returned to service on October 6, 2012. Heritage Streetcar 1006 SFO 04 2015 2362 2.jpg
1008 San Francisco (wings) In service This car was purchased in 1948 and ran in San Francisco. It was outfitted with a pantograph and used for testing in the Market Street Subway in November 1977 - the only PCC car to enter the subway.[57] It was eventually converted into a work car, then restored by Brookville Equipment and returned to service on August 25, 2012. Streetcar 1008 (18958884632).jpg
1009 Dallas Terminal & Railway In service This car was purchased in 1948 and ran in San Francisco until retirement in 1982. This car was stored in Pier 72 where it was damaged by arsonists. It was eventually restored by Brookville Equipment and returned to service on January 17, 2013. However, the computerized door motors proved problematic and 1009 returned to Brookville for a refit, returning to San Francisco in 2014.[58] Muni 1009 next to Embarcadero station, October 2017.jpg
1011 San Francisco (Market Street Railway zip stripe) In service This car was purchased in 1948 and ran in San Francisco until retirement in 1982. This car was stored in Pier 72 where it was damaged by arsonists. 1011 was the last of the four double-enders restored at Brookville, and eschewed the computerized door motors after operating experience proved they were unreliable.[59] It returned to San Francisco after an extensive testing period at Brookville and underwent burn-in testing[60] before re-entering service in 2014. Streetcar 1011 (15302762885).jpg
1040 San Francisco (wings) In service Purchased 1952 as the last PCC streetcar ever built in the United States. Ran in San Francisco wearing this paint scheme until repainted to Landor livery in 1980. Remained in service until the retirement – originally expected to be permanent – of all remaining PCC cars in September 1982, then was repainted back to wings livery and returned to service for the summer 1983 Historic Trolley Festival. Stored out of service in 1987, then operated in tripper service in 1995 for a short time, then finally retired in 1997. 1040 left San Francisco on December 4, 2009, to undergo a full restoration at Brookville Equipment Company in Pennsylvania and returned to service on March 13, 2012. Muni 1040 at the Ferry Building, June 2017.JPG

Inactive/retired streetcar fleet[edit]

10xx class[edit]

The following shows the cars acquired by Muni in the 1940s to 1952 that have yet to be restored.[61][62]

PCC # City/System Represented Status Notes Image
1023 San Francisco Stored MUNI 1023 J CHURCH TO 30TH in Dolores Park, San Fracisco, CA in February 1980 (32807999534).jpg
1026 San Francisco Stored MUNI 1026 J CHURCH TO 30TH in Dolores Park, San Francisco, CA in February 1980 (33266789420).jpg
1027 San Francisco Stored MUNI 1027 J CHURCH TO 30TH in San Francisco, CA in February 1980 R25 (32837139943).jpg
1028 San Francisco Stored Muni 1028 and shelter at Church and 18th Street, August 1981.jpg
1031 San Francisco Stored Muni 1031 as K Ingleside at Ocean and Lee, August 1967.jpg
1033 San Francisco Stored Purchased 1952 as the seventh-to-last PCC streetcar ever built in the United States. Ran in San Francisco until retirement in 1982. After retirement, it was sold to Orange Empire Railway Museum. The car was reacquired in 2003 and is currently stored in Marin Division. Muni 1033 at Marin Division, February 2008.jpg
1034 San Francisco Stored Purchased 1952 as the sixth-to-last PCC streetcar ever built in the United States. Ran in San Francisco until retirement in 1982. After retirement, it was sold to Gunnar Henrioulle in Lake Tahoe. The car was reacquired in 2001 and is currently stored in Marin Division. Muni 1034 at Marin Division, February 2008.jpg
1038 San Francisco Stored Purchased 1952 as the third-to-last PCC streetcar ever built in the United States. Ran in San Francisco until retirement in 1982. After retirement, the car was stored in Pier 72 for a short while until moved to Marin Division.
1039 San Francisco (Simplified) Stored Purchased 1952 as the second-to-last PCC streetcar ever built in the United States. Ran in San Francisco until retirement in 1982. After retirement, it was sold to Orange Empire Railway Museum. The car was reacquired in 2003 and is currently stored in Marin Division.

[11]

Retired cars[edit]

The following shows F-line PCC cars which have been accident-damaged beyond repair. Only one car, 1054 (ex-SEPTA 2121), was wrecked in 2003 and is stored at Marin Division.

PCC # City/System Represented Status Notes Image
1054 Philadelphia Transit Commission (PCC-1938 Livery) Permanently out of service Purchased in 1948 by Philadelphia Transportation Company as 2121 and ran until retirement in 1988. Sold to San Francisco Municipal Railway in 1992 and returned to service in 1995 until collision with a MUNI Metro Breda LRV 1541 on 11/16/03.[36] Stored beyond repair in Marin Division. Muni 1054 on 17th Street, September 1998.jpg
11xx class[edit]

The 1100s series of cars were purchased in 1957 by Muni from St. Louis Public Service. These cars were retired in 1982, with most being sold off to Tahoe Valley Lines and then went to St. Charles, Missouri in 2007 for the planned St. Charles City Streetcar.

PCC # City/System Represented Status Image
1103 San Francisco Stored Muni 1103 at Marin Division, June 2018.JPG
1106 San Francisco
1108 San Francisco MUNI PCC 1108, a L TARAVAL EAST BAY TERMINAL on West Portal Ave. after turning off Ulloa St. in San Francisco, CA on August 24, 1967 (27051483401).jpg
1115 San Francisco MUNI 1115, a M OCEAN VIEW BROAD TO PLYMOUH car in San Fracisco, CA in February 1980 (32943089434).jpg
1125 San Francisco Muni 1125 at Marin Division, February 2008.jpg
1128 St. Louis Public Service
1130 San Francisco
1139 San Francisco Muni 1139 at Marin Division, February 2008.jpg
1140 San Francisco
1158 San Francisco Muni 1158 at Marin Division, February 2008.jpg
1160 San Francisco More on That MUNI Short Turn at West Portal -- 3 Photos (26931188596).jpg
1168 San Francisco Muni 1168 at Marin Division, September 2009.jpg

[11]

Boeing LRVs in storage[edit]
Ex-Muni 1271 in scrapyard (2018)

The US Standard Light Rail Vehicle was an attempt at a standardized light rail vehicle (LRV) promoted by the United States Urban Mass Transit Administration (UMTA) and built by Boeing Vertol in the 1970s. Part of a series of defense conversion projects in the waning days of the Vietnam War, the LRV was seen as both a replacement for older PCC streetcars in many cities and as a catalyst for new cities to construct light rail systems. The USSLRV was marketed as and is popularly known as the Boeing LRV and is usually referred to as such. Both Muni and the MBTA (Boston) purchased the cars, but after a lawsuit with Boeing Vertol and MBTA, they had the ability to reject the last 40 cars. The cars sat in the storage yard, until Muni purchased 31 of them. Muni stored two cars (1264 and 1320) at the Cameron Beach Yard (formerly the Geneva Streetcar Yard) for potential restoration and preservation by the Market Street Railway, but they declined to do so and both were scrapped in April 2016.[63][64]

Boeing 1213 is preserved (since 2000) at the Oregon Electric Railway Museum, while 1258 is preserved at the Western Railway Museum. No. 1271 is used as an office trailer in the yard of Certified Towing in Richmond, California.[65] One of the Boston cars is preserved at the Seashore Trolley Museum, six Boston cars are at the US Government training facility in Pueblo, Colorado, and three Boston cars continue to operate as work cars.[citation needed]

Model Year Built Fleet Series Quantity Year of retirement Notes Image
Boeing USSLRV 1978 1200–1299 130 1996–2001 1212 wrecked into 1255 at the Van Ness junction in the Muni Metro subway in 1987. The good halves were converted into a new 1255 and the bad halves were scrapped in February 1994. San Francisco Boeing LRV at Duboce & Church, March 1980.jpg
1977 1300–1329 1300–1329 entered service in 1981–1984.

Milan "Peter Witt" trams[edit]

These Peter Witt streetcars were originally in service in Milan, Italy.[11] This origin can still be seen in the cars, as all the original Italian signs and notices are still in place. In the meantime, additional signs in English were added.

Car # Livery Status Image
1807 Milan, Italy (Yellow/White) In service Tram class 1500, San Francisco 03.JPG
1811 Milan, Italy (Yellow/White) Out of service Sf streetcar 1811.jpg
1814 Milan, Italy (Two-tone green) In service 1814 Streetcar (27025257632).jpg
1815 Milan, Italy (Orange) In service 1815 Streetcar (26516082223).jpg
1818 Milan, Italy (Two-tone green) In service AFreshlyPaintedMilanPeterWittTramInTwoToneGreenOnItsThirdWeekOfServiceOnTheFLine.jpg
1834 Milan, Italy (Orange) Undergoing restoration
1856 Milan, Italy (Orange) In service Muni 1856 at Market and 3rd Street, April 2010.jpg
1859 Milan, Italy (Orange) In service SF 1859 Peter Witt.jpg
1888 Milan, Italy (Two-tone green) Undergoing repair
1893 Milan, Italy (Orange) In service Muni 1893 at Embarcadero and Bay, March 2011.jpg
1895 Milan, Italy (Orange) In service Heritage Streetcar 1895 SFO 04 2015 2400.JPG

Historic trams[edit]

San Francisco[edit]

The following shows trams that operated in San Francisco before the 1950s under either San Francisco Muni or Market Street Railway.

Car # City of Origin (Car's Paint Scheme Colors) Status Notes Image
1 San Francisco (Battleship Gray) In service This car was purchased in 1912 as one of the original streetcars publicly owned by Muni. The car originally was retired in 1951 and was set aside for a museum. This car was restored in 1962 as part of Muni's 50th anniversary and ran occasionally on special excursions until the late 1980s. This car was restored again in 1995 for the opening of the F-line. In 2009 it was shipped to Brookville Equipment Company for a complete restoration at a cost of $1.8 million. This streetcar returned to service on October 6, 2012.[66] Muni streetcar 1 at Church and 30th, July 1982.jpg
130 San Francisco (Blue/Gold) Out of service This car was purchased in 1914 as part of a 100-car order from Jewett Car Company. This car ran in San Francisco until retirement in 1958. It was converted into a wrecker and was restored to blue and gold colors in 1983. In 2002, No. 130 was dedicated to longtime San Francisco Chronicle columnist Herb Caen.[67] Muni 130 on Market Street, April 2010.jpg
162 San Francisco (Wings) Out of service This car was purchased in 1914 as part of a 125-car order from Jewett Car Company. This car ran in San Francisco until retirement in 1958 and was then sold with another car to Orange Empire Railway Museum. It was reacquired in 2003 by the San Francisco Municipal Railway and restored by Market Street Railway in 2004. The car then underwent further restoration by Muni starting in 2005 and returned to service in August 2008, the 50-year anniversary of its earlier retirement.[68] On January 4, 2014, this car was involved in a collision with a container truck, seriously damaging one of its ends.[69] Rebuilt in Long Beach and returned to Muni in April 2018.[70] SF MUNI 4 18 10 067xRP - Flickr - drewj1946.jpg
578-S Market Street Railway Charter service only Built in 1896 by Hammond Car Company in San Francisco; converted to a work car after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and renumbered to 0601.[71] Restored to original appearance in 1956 and permanently loaned to the Western Railway Museum, but recalled by Muni in 1984 to serve in Trolley Festivals.[71][72] 1895-built Market Street Railway car 578 in 2012, next to SF Railway Museum.jpg
798 Market Street Railway (Whiplash Green/White) Undergoing restoration at Curtis E. Green complex Built in 1924 by the Market Street Railway at Elkton Shops (now Green Division at Ocean & San Jose). Sold for scrap in 1946 and eventually became a jewelry store in Columbia before being repurchased in 1984 using money donated by Embarcadero Center[73] and returned to Muni. Only surviving streetcar of the class operated by Maya Angelou.[74] Moved to Cameron Beach Yard in 2011.[75] Car798UndergoingRestorationAtDuboceYard.jpg
United States[edit]

The following shows trams (including PCCs) which have operated elsewhere in the United States. Some of these are not in service, and even require extensive restoration.

Car # City of Origin (Car's Paint Scheme Colors) Status Notes Image
351 Johnstown,Pennsylvania (Orange/Cream) Awaiting overhaul Intended restoration as a teaching trolley. Originally built in 1926 with rattan seats and wood trim.[76] Streetcar 351 2018-05-06 01-12-03 (27066090817).jpg
913 New Orleans, Louisiana (Green) Awaiting overhaul Originally built in 1923 as one of 73 in its class by Perley Thomas; sold as surplus in 1964 to the Orange Empire Railway Museum; purchased by Muni in 2005.[77] Streetcar 130 2018-05-06 01-10-38 (41891518852).jpg
952 New Orleans, Louisiana (Green) Out of service Originally built in 1923 as one of 73 in its class by Perley Thomas; sold as surplus in 1964 and repurchased from Chattanooga by New Orleans in 1984. Retired again in 1997 when replaced by replica; leased to San Francisco in 1998.[77] Muni 952 on Market Street, September 2010.jpg
2133 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Stored This was SEPTA's demonstration streetcar before the F-line's inception.[78]
2147 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Stored This was acquired as a parts car for the 1050-class PCC fleet, and has a different propulsion from the current fleet.[78] This car is notable for being the only PCC car to ever operate in New Orleans.
4008 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Stored Port Authority 4000 Series PCC, originally built for the Pittsburgh Railways Company, later the Port Authority of Allegheny County. When portions of Port Authority's streetcar system were being rebuilt and modernized in the 1980s, 45 of the Authority's PCC's were to be completely rebuilt as well. However, due to budget problems, only a dozen were actually rebuilt, including 4008 and 4009. After the Overbrook Line's closure in 1993, these cars were relegated to a shuttle service between the Drake Loop and Castle Shannon until retirement in 1999. Purchased at auction in 2001, Nos. 4008 and 4009 are stored and require re-gauging[78] as well as modifications to make them ADA-compliant.
4009 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Awaiting overhaul
The rest of the world[edit]

Trams acquired from outside the United States:

Car # City of Origin (Car's Paint Scheme Colors) Status Notes Image
106 Moscow/Orel, Russia (Red) Stored awaiting restoration "Streetcar Named Desire for Peace",[79] gifted to Mayor Dianne Feinstein by the Soviet Union[80] through the efforts of Maury Klebolt.[81] Last ran in 1992 for the parade celebrating the 100th anniversary of streetcar service in San Francisco.[82] Streetcar 106 2018-05-06 01-11-44 (41036335265).jpg
151 Osaka, Japan Stored awaiting restoration Built by Kawasaki in 1927; arrived in San Francisco in 1988.[83] Restoration prioritized over 578j because 151 is from sister city (Osaka) and has four motors, making it more suitable for service.[84] Streetcar 151 at Marin Division, June 2018.JPG
189 Porto, Portugal Undergoing restoration Copy of a J. G. Brill Company streetcar design, built in 1929. Purchased in 1984 from Paul Class after running in the first (1983) Historic Trolley Festival. Last run in 1987.[85]
228 Blackpool, England (Green/White) Operational Distinctive open-air "boat" car, one of twelve built for Blackpool Transport in 1934. Brought to San Francisco in 1984.[86][87] SF Muni HSF 228 Blackpool.jpg
233 Blackpool, England (Green/White) Operational Open-air boat car, one of twelve built for Blackpool Transport in 1934. Declared surplus in 2010[87] and purchased from Lancastrian Transport Trust in 2013.[86] 233 boat tram! -muniheritage (21734580135).jpg
496 Melbourne, Australia (Green/Beige) Operational W2-class, first operated in Feb 1928. Purchased by Muni in 1984 with No. 586.[88] As of 2018, regularly operates weekends on E Line, which requires double-ended cars, because there is no turnaround at the southern terminus.[89] Sf streetcar 496.jpg
578-J Kobe/Hiroshima, Japan Undergoing restoration Originally built in 1927 as No. 574, one of the 570 streetcar (ja) class for the Kobe City Railways (ja). Acquired by Hiroshima Electric Railway in 1971 when Kobe City Railways closed; later brought to San Francisco in 1986 for the Trolley Festival that year.[90] Ex-Kobe streetcar 578 turning into SF Transbay Terminal in 1987.jpg
586 Melbourne, Australia (Green/Beige) Out of service W2-class. Is a parts car for 496.[88] Donated its trucks for 916, trucks went under refurbishment and were installed in February 2018.
737 (7037) Brussels, Belgium Operational This car's original service career was spent on the Brussels, Belgium streetcar system as No. 7037, starting in 1952. Arrived in San Francisco in June 2004 and repainted in the blue-and-white paint scheme of the Verkehrsbetriebe Zürich, as Zurich, Switzerland, is a sister city of San Francisco, entering Muni service in 2005.[91] Has seen only limited service because it has specialized parts and is a narrow streetcar, limiting capacity. San Francisco streetcar 737 (ex-Brussels 7037) in Zurich paint scheme in 2014.jpg
916 Melbourne, Australia (Green/Beige) Operational SW6-class. Entered service in 1946; donated by State of Victoria to San Francisco in 2009.[92] Awaited modifications necessary to operate on E and F line from 2009 to 2018. In early February, 916 received its permanent trucks and final modifications. It awaits CPUC inspection. Streetcar DSC06061 (15026236392).jpg
3557 Hamburg, Germany (Red/White) Stored awaiting potential restoration Built in 1954; V6E class. Retired in 1978 when Hamburg Tramway (de) was discontinued; arrived in San Francisco, 1979. Delivered to City Hall as a surprise, leading to the headline "A Streetcar Named Undesirable".[93] Last ran in 1992. Major structural revisions necessary for ADA requirements.[94]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k McKane, John; Perles, Anthony (1982). Inside Muni: The Properties and Operations of the Municipal Railway of San Francisco. Interurban Press. ISBN 978-0916374495.
  2. ^ "Fiscal Year 2008 Short Range Transit Plan: Chapter 7" (PDF). San Francisco Metropolitan Transportation Agency. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 5, 2009. Retrieved December 25, 2007.
  3. ^ Rhodes, Michael (28 May 2010). "Muni Gets First Two Refurbished Buses Back from the Shop". Streetsblog San Francisco. Retrieved 17 May 2018.
  4. ^ "SFMTA Unveils Rehabilitated Neoplan Bus". archives.sfmta.com. Retrieved 17 May 2018.
  5. ^ "Balky new bus spoils Muni's show". The San Francisco Chronicle.
  6. ^ Rodriguez, Joe Fitzgerald (April 18, 2017). "Muni's worst clunker buses to be replaced for big price tag: $244M". San Francisco Examiner. Retrieved 2017-05-09.
  7. ^ a b Kato, Erica (February 9, 2018). "Here Come the New 40' Trolleys". SFMTA. Retrieved 2018-02-21.
  8. ^ Trolleybus Magazine No. 329 (September–October 2016), p. 159. National Trolleybus Association (UK). ISSN 0266-7452
  9. ^ Breda Specification Sheet
  10. ^ "E-Line Finally Budgeted...For 2016!". Market Street Railway. Retrieved March 31, 2014.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h "Museums in Motion: F-line fleet operational status". Market Street Railway. Retrieved December 27, 2007.
  12. ^ "Muni NX Buses To Be Replaced With Hybrids". San Francisco Examiner. Retrieved December 14, 2013.
  13. ^ "Taking the Bus: Muni Vehicles End Up in the Darndest Places". SF Weekly. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  14. ^ "SFMTA Renames Historic Streetcar Yard for Cameron Beach" (Press release). San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. 25 October 2011. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  15. ^ Nolte, Carl (29 October 2003). "David L. Pharr -- expert restorer of S.F. streetcars". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  16. ^ "Back in Business". Market Street Railway. July 27, 2008. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  17. ^ Iacuessa, Michael (December 2017). "Islais Creek SFMTA Facility Fails to Deliver on its Promises". Potrero View.
  18. ^ "SFMTA Explores Double Deck bus option". San Francisco Metropolitan Transportation Agency. December 2017.
  19. ^ Meriwether, Douglas (2015). The Dao of Doug 2: The Art of Driving A Bus / Keeping Zen in San Francisco Transit: A Line Trainer's Guide. Balboa Press. ISBN 9781452522821.
  20. ^ "Hybrid Diesel Electric Transit Buses". Maryland Transit Administration. Retrieved April 6, 2013.
  21. ^ Muni's 'Connected Bus' is about to go online
  22. ^ Gordon, Rachel (March 7, 2008). "Vandals halt some hybrid buses in Hunters Point". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved April 6, 2013.
  23. ^ Item 12 New Flyer Contract
  24. ^ "San Francisco Commits To All-Electric Bus Fleet By 2035" (Press release). San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. May 15, 2018.
  25. ^ a b c Murray, Alan (2000). World Trolleybus Encyclopaedia, p. 79. Yateley, Hampshire, UK: Trolleybooks. ISBN 0-904235-18-1.
  26. ^ "Tom's North American (Canada, USA, Mexico) Trolleybus Pix". Retrieved December 25, 2007.
  27. ^ "General Information About Transit". San Francisco MTA. Archived from the original on January 28, 2013. Retrieved December 28, 2012.
  28. ^ Perles, Anthony (1984). Tours of Discovery: A San Francisco Muni Album. Interurban Press. p. 127. ISBN 0-916374-60-2.
  29. ^ Box, Roland (May–June 1989). "San Francisco Looks Ahead". Trolleybus Magazine No. 165, pp. 50–56. National Trolleybus Association (UK).
  30. ^ Trolleybus Magazine No. 195 (May–June 1994), p. 83.
  31. ^ Trolleybus Magazine No. 259 (January–February 2005), p. 23.
  32. ^ "Tom's Trolley Bus Pictures San Francisco CA Fixed Frame". Retrieved December 25, 2007.
  33. ^ Rachel Gordon (December 3, 2007). "Elite craftsmen keep S.F. cable car in good shape". San Francisco Chronicle/SFGate. Retrieved 2007-12-26.
  34. ^ Cabanatuan, Michael. "$1.2 billion contract OKd for new Muni Metro light-rail cars". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 5 August 2014.
  35. ^ "First New Muni State-of-the-Art Train Makes Debut in Service" (Press release). San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. November 17, 2017. Retrieved March 5, 2018.
  36. ^ a b "Car 1054" (PDF). Inside Track Newsletter. Market Street Railway. Winter 2004.(subscription required)
  37. ^ Walsh, Diana (17 November 2003). "3 Muni employees injured in collision". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  38. ^ "'Ruby Slippers' Dances along the F-line Again". Market Street Railway. 17 March 2012. Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  39. ^ a b "Kansas City, Outta Here!". Market Street Railway. 21 October 2014. Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  40. ^ "Third PCC Goes Into Rehab". Market Street Railway. 6 June 2015. Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  41. ^ Flores, Joseph; Sheridan, Kevin (17 May 2016). Trip Report - Brookville ex-SEPTA PCC Overhaul, May 2016 (PDF) (Report). San Francisco Municipal Railway. Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  42. ^ a b c d e f "Second Renovated PCC Back From Contractor". Market Street Railway. 10 November 2016. Retrieved 19 March 2017.
  43. ^ a b c "Welcome Back, Harvey Milk's Streetcar!". Market Street Railway. 15 March 2017. Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  44. ^ "Muni Streetcar No. 1051 Dedicated to Supervisor Harvey Milk" (Press release). Market Street Railway. 29 October 2008. Retrieved 19 March 2017.
  45. ^ "San Francisco Welcomes the Harvey Milk Streetcar Back Into Service" (PDF) (Press release). San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. 15 March 2017. Retrieved 19 March 2017.
  46. ^ Nahmod, David-Elijah (16 March 2017). "Restored, Re-Dedicated Harvey Milk Streetcar Returns To The Streets". Hoodline. Retrieved 19 March 2017.
  47. ^ "Brooklyn is back". Market Street Railway. 6 April 2018. Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  48. ^ "Our Spies are Everywhere!". Market Street Railway. 29 August 2017. Retrieved 7 December 2017.
  49. ^ a b c "Boston's Back in Business". Market Street Railway. 20 May 2017. Retrieved 7 December 2017.
  50. ^ "Historic San Francisco PCC cars to be rebuilt". Trains Magazine. Trains Magazine. Retrieved 11 November 2014.(subscription required)
  51. ^ "Kansas City PCC 1056 Back at Muni". Market Street Railway. 26 August 2016. Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  52. ^ a b "Perfect November Saturday on the Waterfront". Market Street Railway. 18 November 2017. Retrieved 7 December 2017.
  53. ^ a b Laubscher, Rick (26 October 2017). "Baltimore Blues". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 7 December 2017.
  54. ^ "Pittsburgh in Nevada, Inbound". Market Street Railway. 24 June 2017. Retrieved 7 December 2017.
  55. ^ ""Newest" PCC Streetcar Collides with Truck". Market Street Railway. January 2, 2018.
  56. ^ SEPTA Pasts of F-Line PCCs 1050-1063
  57. ^ Perles, Anthony (1981). The People's Railway: The History of the Municipal Railway of San Francisco. Interurban Press. p. 234. ISBN 0916374424.
  58. ^ "On Donner!". Market Street Railway. 28 February 2014. Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  59. ^ "The Straggler May Finally Head Our Way". Market Street Railway. 9 September 2013. Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  60. ^ "Last Renovated PCC Back in Town". Market Street Railway. 18 September 2013. Retrieved 22 March 2017.
  61. ^ Prial, Frank J. (December 9, 2001). "New Life for Old Trolleys". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-09-13.
  62. ^ The 17th & 18th 'Vintage Cars?'
  63. ^ Lelchuk, Ilene (14 January 2002). "Muni cars on a roll into city junkyard / Even preservationists reject the clunkers". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 21 April 2017.
  64. ^ Rodriguez, Joe Fitzgerald (31 March 2016). "Last of Muni's 1980's-era clunker trains will be scrapped". San Francisco Examiner. Retrieved 4 May 2017.
  65. ^ Sheridan, Kevin (20 November 2006). "SFmuni1271". flickr. Retrieved 21 April 2017.
  66. ^ "No. 1: San Francisco Municipal Railway". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  67. ^ "Car No. 130 Dedicated to Herb Caen" (Press release). Market Street Railway. 15 April 2002. Retrieved 19 March 2017.
  68. ^ "No Way to Start Its Centennial Year!". Market Street Railway. 4 January 2014. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  69. ^ "Embarcadero clear following SF Muni streetcar, big-rig crash". ABC 7 News. 4 January 2014. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  70. ^ "Welcome Home, 162!". Market Street Railway. 23 April 2018. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  71. ^ a b "No. 578: Market Street Railway Company". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  72. ^ "Patriarch Streetcar Turns 120". Market Street Railway. 9 August 2016. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  73. ^ "Great Institutions Make Great Things Possible". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  74. ^ "No. 798: Market Street Railway Company". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  75. ^ "Safe From the Weather At Last". Market Street Railway. 2 November 2011. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  76. ^ "No. 351: Johnstown, Pennsylvania". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  77. ^ a b "No. 952: New Orleans, Louisiana". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  78. ^ a b c "The Streetcar Fleet". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  79. ^ "Great Video of 1992 Streetcar Centennial". Market Street Railway. 16 August 2015. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  80. ^ "From Russia, With Ink". Market Street Railway. 28 November 2011. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  81. ^ "Remembering a Trolley Titan". Market Street Railway. April 15, 2003. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  82. ^ "Happy 125th to San Francisco Electric Streetcars". Market Street Railway. 27 April 2017. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  83. ^ "No. 151: Osaka, Japan". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  84. ^ "What Have We Learned". Market Street Railway. 4 August 2008. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  85. ^ "No. 189: Porto, Portugal". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  86. ^ a b "New Boat Could Be on Display This Weekend". Market Street Railway. 30 October 2013. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  87. ^ a b "No. 228 & 233: Blackpool, England". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  88. ^ a b "No. 496: Melbourne, Australia (W2 Class)". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  89. ^ "Say 'G'day' to Melbourne on the E-line this weekend". Market Street Railway. 2 February 2018. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  90. ^ "No. 578j: Kobe & Hiroshima, Japan". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  91. ^ "No. 737: Zurich, Switzerland". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  92. ^ "No. 916: Melbourne, Australia (SW6 Class)". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  93. ^ Kilduff, Marshall (March 15, 1979). "A Streetcar Named Undesirable". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  94. ^ "No. 3557: Hamburg, Germany". Market Street Railway. Retrieved 23 May 2018.

External links[edit]