Syllabub

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Syllabub
Syllabub.jpg
Course Dessert
Place of origin England
Main ingredients Milk or cream, sugar, wine
Cookbook: Syllabub  Media: Syllabub

Syllabub is an English sweet frothy drink popular from the 16th to 19th centuries.[1] It is made of milk or cream, curdled by the admixture of wine, cider, or other acid, and often sweetened and flavoured.

History[edit]

Syllabub (or solybubbe, sullabub, sullibib, sullybub, sullibub—the is no certain etymology and considerable variation in spelling) has been known in England at least since John Heywood's Thersytes of about 1537: "You and I... Muste walke to him and eate a solybubbe."[2] The word occurs repeatedly, including in Samuel Pepys's diary for 12 July 1663; "Then to Comissioner Petts and had a good Sullybub"[3] and in Thomas Hughes's Tom Brown at Oxford of 1861; "We retire to tea or syllabub beneath the shade of some great oak."[4]

A later variation, known as an everlasting syllabub, adds a stabiliser such as eggwhite, gelatin or corn starch.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alan Davidson (21 August 2014). The Oxford Companion to Food. OUP Oxford. pp. 800–. ISBN 978-0-19-104072-6. 
  2. ^ Heywood, John (1537) Thersytes
  3. ^ Pepys, Samuel Diary of Samuel Pepys, 12 July 1663
  4. ^ Hughes, Thomas (1861) Tom Brown at Oxford

External links[edit]