Talk:Alonzo Church

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Untitled[edit]

Quote:

"His discovery of the lambda calculus."

Is "discovery" the right word to say? Talam 14:36, 16 March 2006 (UTC)Reply[reply]

This brings us to the old problem of Realism which raises the question, "Did Lambda Calculus always have a reality in the external world and was only brought to our notice recently by Church's writings?" According to Mathematical Realists, Lambda Calculus has always existed in the world apart from human brains. Church's brain discovered it and consequently it became a part of the (Ideal, subjective), internal operations of many human brains. In a nutshell, is it real/objective/external or ideal/subjective/internal?Lestrade (talk) 03:30, 28 January 2008 (UTC)lestradeReply[reply]
Not to interrupt the display of pretentiousness or anything, but lambda calculus was developed as a notation for talking about mathematical objects (in particular, functions). If there is an issue of realism here, it is a rather implausible realism about formal languages, not a traditional form of realism about mathematical objects. 145.18.22.149 (talk) 15:31, 16 February 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Best known for?[edit]

The Introduction mentions the Church-Rosser Theorem (counfluence of lambda calculus) among his major achievements, but doesn't mention Church's Theorem (undecidability of predicate logic); in the main text the situation is the opposite. I would say the Introduction ought to be brought in line with the main text in this regard. Predicate logic is the _lingua franca_ of symbolic logic, whereas the lambda calculus -- while by no means unimportant -- is but one of many equally well-known theoretical models of computation. Nastor (talk) 14:10, 22 May 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Church's theorem[edit]

Is it correct for Church's theorem to link to the Entscheidungsproblem, since Church's theorem relates to the undecidability of the Entscheidungsproblem? Does Church's theorem warrant a separate article? Froskoy (talk) 08:21, 5 February 2013 (UTC)Reply[reply]

The Entscheidungsproblem isn't undecidable (that's the wrong word) it is unsolvable.
I've fixed that. — Preceding unsigned comment added by ThePinkGerbil (talkcontribs) 17:40, 22 June 2020 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Alonzo[edit]

Alonzo and his uncle might have been named after the small town in Kentucky, in America. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.160.51.140 (talk) 09:18, 28 May 2015 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Berlinski[edit]

What reason is there to think that *the linked to* David Berlinski was a student of Church's? 81.135.40.150 (talk) 13:55, 25 April 2017 (UTC)Reply[reply]

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified 3 external links on Alonzo Church. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, you may follow the instructions on the template below to fix any issues with the URLs.

This message was posted before February 2018. After February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete these "External links modified" talk page sections if they want to de-clutter talk pages, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{source check}} (last update: 18 January 2022).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.

Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 17:47, 2 July 2017 (UTC)Reply[reply]

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified 2 external links on Alonzo Church. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, you may follow the instructions on the template below to fix any issues with the URLs.

This message was posted before February 2018. After February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete these "External links modified" talk page sections if they want to de-clutter talk pages, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template {{source check}} (last update: 18 January 2022).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.

Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 11:02, 5 December 2017 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Non-referring reference[edit]

There is a reference: 'see e.g. Church 1970', but who knows what it is!? There are five of his works mentioned:

Alonzo Church, Introduction to Mathematical Logic (ISBN 978-0-691-02906-1)[15]

Alonzo Church, The Calculi of Lambda-Conversion (ISBN 978-0-691-08394-0)[16]

Alonzo Church, A Bibliography of Symbolic Logic, 1666–1935 (ISBN 978-0-8218-0084-3)

Alonzo Church interviewed by William Aspray on 17 May 1984. The Princeton Mathematics Community in the 1930s: An Oral-History Project, transcript number 5.

Church, A. (1950). "On Carnap's Analysis of Statements of Assertion and Belief". The Journal of Symbolic Logic. 10 (5): 97–99. doi:10.2307/3326684. JSTOR 3326684.

and not one of them was published in 1970. ThePinkGerbil (talk) 17:43, 22 June 2020 (UTC)Reply[reply]