Talk:Cape Canaveral

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Florida (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Florida.
If you would like to join us, please visit the project page; if you have any questions, please consult the FAQ.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
Wikipedia CD Selection
WikiProject icon Cape Canaveral is included in the Wikipedia CD Selection, see Cape Canaveral at Schools Wikipedia. Please maintain high quality standards; if you are an established editor your last version in the article history may be used so please don't leave the article with unresolved issues, and make an extra effort to include free images, because non-free images cannot be used on the DVDs.
 

Name[edit]

Cape Canaveral named Cape Kennedy. Why was it changed back?


People didn't like the name


Something is messed up here with redirects:

but

It appears the article name is right. I'm going to fix the talk page. -- Chuq 15:02, 22 July 2006 (UTC)

I find the statement 'third-oldest European place name in the US' to be disputable since two place names in Puerto Rico: "San Juan" (1493; later restricted to mean just the capital of its namesake island) and "Caparra" (1508) are still currently in use (and are in the United States). Note that St._Augustine,_Florida article correctly articulates the 'continental' distinction in its claims. Vaughnsc (talk) 14:54, 23 May 2017 (UTC)

Weather question[edit]

The article gave reasons as to why it was built in Florida, but why didn't they take into account to frequent bad weather that is typical of Florida? It seems like every launch is delayed at least once due to weather, which is a huge waste of taxpayer money.—Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.240.182.65 (talkcontribs)

Location, location, location. And no place has perfect weather. -- Donald Albury 22:49, 5 September 2006 (UTC)
The weather is better in Florida than in most places. Shuttle launches are just very sensitive. If you had it out in the desert somewhere, you might be better off, but there aren't any deserts as far south in the continental US. Lattitude is a big concern, and putting all the parts on boats every time you send new equipment in or the shuttle has to land at an alternate site would be a nightmare. Athaler 07:38, 15 November 2006 (UTC)
The article makes clear that you need a site that faces the ocean to the east and is as close as possible to the Equator, and that logistics make Hawaii and Puerto Rico impractical. Mainland US + east cost + closest to equator = Florida. No other option. Also, as the article on Challenger disaster notes, "31 °F (−0.5 °C), the minimum temperature permitted for launch." Afternoon thunderstorms in the summer, with the occasional attendant hail, are the trade-off for hardly ever having sub-freezing temperatures. Also, some delays are due to wind beyond the permitted limits. Not many places are totally wind-free, especially near the ocean. (See Sea breeze. The US's deserts are in the western third of the country. Launching eastward, which is done for the reasons in the article (Earth's spin), puts the rocket's path over 2/3 of the US land, much of it heavily inhabited. The article on Vandenberg Air Force Base notes that a Space Shuttle launch facility was planned and started there. Its Southern California location has frequent coastal fog, but much less rain than Florida and vastly fewer thunderstorms. The Challenger disaster pointed out the risk of launching eastward over the entire mainland US, so the Vandenberg Shuttle plan was abandoned. Vandenberg is still used for ballistic-missile tests (where the help of Earth's spin to get to orbit is irrelevant, so you can launch over the ocean to the west) and for polar-orbit launches, where Cape Canaveral would have to launch north across the heavily-populated eastern US. You can't have everything! Unimaginative Username (talk) 06:57, 28 November 2007 (UTC)

Cape Canaveral is not home to KSC[edit]

It is a common misconception that the Kennedy Space Center is in Cape Canaveral. This is not true. While launch pads 39A and 39B are accross the Banana river on Cape Canaveral, the entire Kennedy Space Center is on Merritt Island, including it's headquarters. Cape Canaveral became known only because the launch pads for the Shuttles and previous launch vehicles are across the Banana river on an isolated strip of land that is considered Cape Canaveral. 130.76.96.14 18:25, 16 March 2007 (UTC)jkrup44

Not quite. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, which actually *is* on Cape Canaveral, was and still is the site of unmanned launches, long before KSC existed. This map shows the several dozen launch sites on CCAFS/Cape Canaveral. Note that Launch Site 46 is practically on the very tip of the Cape itself. Unimaginative Username (talk) 07:07, 28 November 2007 (UTC)

Citation Needed?[edit]

The article says this and someone says that a citation is needed. "The "Cape Kennedy" name shows up in some 1960s TV shows, at least in episodes of "Flipper" and "I Dream of Jeannie".[citation needed]" Isn't this sort of ridiculous considering the fact that that the citation is the shows themselves. If the article says the name "Cape Kennedy" appeared in these shows, how could there be further citation? All one has to do it refer to the shows. Mirlin 21:47, 4 October 2006 (UTC)

Please see Wikipedia:Verifiability, Wikipedia:No original research and Wikipedia:Reliable sources. -- Donald Albury 23:18, 4 October 2006 (UTC)
This comment is conserning what happens on TV. As such, it should be treated like an article on a TV show, following the rules that statements about TV shows follow. When you write about a TV show it is not needed to site sources other than the TV show for something that happened on the TV show. I see no need for a citation here. The TV shows are the citations for the comment. I will remove it, and if anyone still thinks it should be there then they can put that back, or find a source for it themselves (though I don't know where a citation could posibly be found on this.) SadanYagci 23:31, 19 February 2007 (UTC)
I have reverted your removal of the 'fact' tag. Please do not ever remove such tags without supplying a citation to a reliable source. Please read Wikipedia:Verifiability#Burden of evidence. If no independent reliable source has written about the items, then they do not meet the verifiability policy, and don't belong in Wikipedia. -- Donald Albury 23:50, 20 February 2007 (UTC)
It's not original research to say "X" was mentioned in a particular TV show, any more than it would be to say a particular actor starred in a TV show. The source there would be the TV show itself, in the credits, and that's no more original research than taking various statistics and forming them into a list, or subtracting two figures to say something like "the city lost X people between the 1990 and 2000 census". That's not what the original research policy prohibits. As for verifiability and reliable sources, what more reliable source is there for a TV show than the show itself? Anyone can watch the show (just as they can look up something in a book) and verify that the term is mentioned in the show. The citation tags here aren't needed. PaulGS 18:45, 6 May 2007 (UTC)
I don't think the TV show "Flipper" was set at the Space Coast, as claimed.Eregli bob (talk) 11:50, 22 March 2008 (UTC)

People Living On Canaveral?[edit]

Just one question: do people live on Cape Canaveral or no? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 76.16.151.77 (talk) 02:47, 26 February 2007 (UTC).

Depends on how you define the area of the cape. People certainly live in Cape Canaveral, Florida. -- Donald Albury 22:48, 26 February 2007 (UTC)


Of course! Cape canaveral is a thriving city, with many hotels, condos, restraunts, bars, businesses, and of course beaches. The remote area where launches take place is in an isolated area, accessible only from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, or the Kennedy Space Center. Port Canaveral, which is in Cape Canaveral is home to many cruise ships too.

Fair use rationale for Image:The Simpsons 1F13 Cape Canaveral sign.jpg[edit]

Nuvola apps important.svg

Image:The Simpsons 1F13 Cape Canaveral sign.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images lacking such an explanation can be deleted one week after being tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot (talk) 02:34, 12 February 2008 (UTC)

Area code[edit]

While the trivia bit about the area code might be appropriate in the Cape Canaveral, Florida or Kennedy Space Center articles, I don't think it belongs in this article. In fact, the only place I think it is really appropriate (and not just trivia) is in the Area code 321 article (where it is only alluded to without a source). This article is about the geographical feature, and we don't include area codes for such. -- Donald Albury 14:14, 21 July 2008 (UTC)

Demographics don't add up[edit]

"As of the census[7] of 2000, ... The racial makeup of the city was 94.7% White, 12.3% African American, 0.9% Native American, 3.6% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 5.5% from other races, and 2.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.5% of the population."

These add to 132%. even after considering "Latino of any race were 12.5%" it's 119.5%. What's up with that? Grammarmonger (talk) 18:12, 18 August 2009 (UTC)

Someone had apparently mixed up percentages for the city and for the US as a whole. I corrected and added a cite to the source. -- Donald Albury 22:12, 18 August 2009 (UTC)
I wasn't paying enough attention, this article is about the geographical feature, not the city, so I just removed the demographics, etc. that apply only to the city. -- Donald Albury 22:16, 18 August 2009 (UTC)

"Town" of Artesia[edit]

I doubt that there was a "town" called Artesia and this was the name for all of Cape Canaveral which is what the text suggests. Until 1953 and maybe after, there was an "Artesia" post office where then then "A1A" road came closest to the harbor. So that little area, along with a couple of houses, might have been called "Artesia." But not what now is called Cape Canaveral (and maybe even then. Cape Canaveral isn't new either!).

Etymology[edit]

I find it strange that the article does not mention the origin of the name Canaveral. It comes from the spanish "cañaveral" which means sugar cane field. Should I just add a blurb in the intro? Any suggestions?Markeilz (talk) 23:01, 19 April 2010 (UTC)

Need to track that this was why the name Canaveral was used and not named after something else. Be nice to have footnote. If this common, there should be a reference somewhere. Student7 (talk) 16:24, 21 April 2010 (UTC)
1775 Thomas Jefferys map spells the name "Cape Cannaveral". 108.173.94.58 (talk) 23:51, 21 January 2014 (UTC)
It wasn't until the end of the 1700s the Spanish digraph 'nn' morphed into the 'ñ' ligature (if you squint, the 'tilde' is a stylised, flattened n') See Ñ. Other Romance languages still use digraphs: e.g. 'nh' 'gn' to represent the sound: 'piranha' 'lasagna'. As such, not inconsistent to see it used in 'nn' form Vaughnsc (talk) 14:35, 23 May 2017 (UTC)

These need to be rewritten: These are sentence fragments.[edit]

The Timucuans and Ays Indians [2] were there when the Spanish arrived.[3] The Onathaqua tribe or village was in the area. They were in alliance with the Calusa in 1564. They may have been part of the Ais tribe.[4]

I appreciate that this may seem jerky. Note that they are all cited (with your help). The problem we have with any initial native American contact is verification. So little was recorded soon enough. The records all say Timucuans were "as far south as Cape Canaveral." Does that mean they strayed into what is now the city of Cape Canaveral. I, like you, doubt it, but we just can't prove otherwise. Little is "smooth" when we discuss North American natives. Sometimes we have better info on the Mayans, Incas and Aztecs, and maybe Mississippi culture. Just not relatively small tribes or ones that died out too early to have their history recorded in some scholarly manner. Student7 (talk) 19:56, 22 June 2012 (UTC)
It is definitely murky. John H. Hann, in Indians of Central and South Florida 1513-1763, notes that the southern limit of the Timucua along the coast depends on the affiliation of the Surruque, who lived near the Mosquito Lagoon. While most authorities count the Surruque as Timucua, Hann notes that, "there is evidence to suggest, although not definitively, that the Surruque are related to the Ais rather than the Timucua" (page 6). To complicate that, Hann has a map (page 13) showing the Ais extending north of Cape Canaveral, with the Surruque along the coast near present day Daytona Beach. I would suggest that we do not know enough to say which tribe lived around the cape in the 16th and 17th centuries. -- Donald Albury 15:32, 25 June 2012 (UTC)
Thanks for the information. You appear to have vastly more reliable information than the rest of us. If you think any changes should be made, I hope you will do so. Student7 (talk) 22:04, 27 June 2012 (UTC)
I replaced that material with new material based on recent scholarship. I will note that the "Onathaqua tribe or village" probably refers to the "Onatheaqua" reported by the French to be living in north central Florida, which Hann thinks were the Northern Utina or the Arapaha, a branch of the Timucua living in southern Georgia.(John H. Hann, A History of the Timucua Indians and Missions, pp. 18-19) -- Donald Albury 12:29, 5 July 2012 (UTC)

This page is completely outdated the space shuttle program was shut down in 2010. please upedate this page! — Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.108.201.92 (talk) 04:43, 15 November 2012 (UTC)

Former kscvisit.com circularity[edit]

This article cited a deadlink, http://kscvisit.com/cape-canaveral.html . I went in to fix it and edited it to point to an archive on Wayback Machine on archive.org.

But looking more closely at it, it seems obvious that this former site is just an unacknowledged copy of an old version of this article, i.e. citogenesis. The wording is very similar, but this passage, at the source, clinches it:

Jacqueline Kennedy also stated if she had known that the Canaveral name had existed for 400 years, she never would have supported changing the name.[citation needed]

With "[citation needed]", it seems clear to have been copied from Wikipedia, not the other way around.

It's used to support four different sections, so a replacement cite needs to cover all those bases, or else the interdependency needs to be unwound. TJRC (talk) 00:37, 27 February 2015 (UTC)

Alleged metonymy is OR[edit]

This sentence from the lead is not verified in the article body:

Since many U.S. spacecraft are launched from both the station and the Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, the terms "Cape Canaveral," "Canaveral", or "the Cape" have become metonyms that refer to both as the launch site of spacecraft.

Just because people get confused and conflate one thing for the other, that does not mean they are metonyms (like Hollywood, Wall Street, or the White House). JustinTime55 (talk) 21:49, 27 June 2016 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified 4 external links on Cape Canaveral. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true or failed to let others know (documentation at {{Sourcecheck}}).

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required on behalf of editors regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification, as with any edit, using the archive tools per instructions below. This message updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 1 May 2018).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 13:32, 14 November 2016 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified 2 external links on Cape Canaveral. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, you may follow the instructions on the template below to fix any issues with the URLs.

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot. No special action is required on behalf of editors regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification, as with any edit, using the archive tools per instructions below. This message updated dynamically through the template {{sourcecheck}} (last update: 1 May 2018).

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.


Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 10:51, 30 July 2017 (UTC)