Talk:Eric Wynalda

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Untitled[edit]

Why do they call him Waldo? That could be something interesting to put in this article. - anonymous

Affair news event[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Eric_Wynalda&diff=341712958&oldid=341617529 I can't find anything online supporting the rather salacious details in this blurb. Can anyone else? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 65.211.22.82 (talk) 19:19, 3 February 2010 (UTC)

Controversy[edit]

Some background, I lived in northern California in the 1980s and have followed Wynalda's career since he played with the Nomads and SDSU. I'm a big fan of his, but I've also despaired over the years at his undeniable streak of self-destructiveness. Now to the issues:

1. Noted for scoring and controversy. I don't see how that's POV. That defines him, as the article documents. It began in college and continued to his recent comments regarding Jim Rome.

2. Move to Europe: I remember when he was kicked off the Blackhawks. That action was a long time coming. At the time there was a growing disenchantment with Wynalda in the national team program which began with his red card in the 1990 World Cup. However, his talent was undeniable so people put up with him. By 1992 though, Wynalda was washed up (or so it seemed at the time). His appearences with the national team had declined dramatically. In 1991, he played 13 games but scored only one goal. It got so bad, Wynalda was coming out for Ted Eck. In 1992, the U.S. played 21 games. Wynalda was in seven. Wynalda also wasn't producing for the Blackhawks. He was never named to the APSL first team and never led either the league or the team in scoring. That's the background to the incident with Calloway. When Calloway pulled him out of one of the Blackhawks games and Wynalda began screaming at him on the sideline, Wynalda was done in the U.S. Nobody wanted him. When he said that he was going to Europe, people laughed at the idea. If he couldn't make it with an 8-8 team in the APSL, how was he going to succeed in Germany? All that background provides context for his success, considered almost a miracle at the time, with Saarbrucken.

3. Return to San Jose (San Francsico): When MLS decided to pair up Wynalda with Calloway in San Jose, a lot of people were skeptical of how that would work out. Sure enough, the Clash were a reprise of the Blackhaws. That's relevant. Wynalda failed to score like expected, just like with the Blackhawks. He fought with Calloway, like with the Blackhawks. However, he also added a twist by fighting, literaly, with his team mates.

None of this is POV and its not a personal attack, it's an accurate portrayal of the reality of Wynalda's career, both the good and the bad. He's a fascinating athlete, undeniably talented but also undeniably self-destructive. Any portrayal of Wynalda needs to include both facets to be accurate.Mohrflies 04:46, 17 June 2007 (UTC)


  • Point 1 noted by whom? By you? By me? By pundits? This is pov and OR at it's best.
  • Point 2 sources for this alleged row with the manager? Outside documentation outlining the disenchantment felt after '90? Verifiable third party sources for him being washed up in 92 with drastically declining appearances? Until you have some, it's wildly pov. The only one that's sourced is his locker-room fight with John Doyle, personal feelings about Wynalda aside (I think he's a douche) but trading punches with somebody isn't inherently notable. NOW, if sources can be found which substantiate that he was such a lockerroom problem...THEN the fight becomes notable as it serves to reinforce the sources provided.
  • Point 3 who expected him to score? I sure didn't, I expected him to continue to be a pompus, arrogant ass, who never was as good as he though. Again, notwithstanding, which sources are we using that show he was expected to be a scoring machine? Where are the sources about him fighting with Calloway again?

I don't deny that the article needs to show an accurate portrayal of the athlete, but it needs to do so with verifiable third party sources. The part in the opening paragraph is a conclusion of his career, it needs to be sourced, otherwise it's read as a conclusion ONE editor made as to how his career was characterised.

Additional point about the Jim Rome thing, it was widely reported on major news outlets and Wyndalda was forced to apologize on air, it is encyclopedic and does have a place in the article. Batman2005 11:40, 20 June 2007 (UTC)

Point 2 As I mentioned, I'm a northern California soccer fan so I've followed that scene closely. When the APSL was around it had no national press coverage. Coverage came from either Soccer America or soccer-friendly local newspapers. Unfortunately I tossed my old Soccer Americas years ago, something I now regret. As I remember it, with no third party articles to back me up, by spring 1992 Wynalda had alienated just about everyone in the U.S. When he got kicked off the Blackhawks, nobody would hire him. When he suddenly announced he planned to move to a European league, it seemed so outlandish that it made his success seem miraculous. Maybe somebody could find some old Soccer Americas and check the dates and details.
Point 3 The only documentation about the Blackhawks era feud between Calloway and Wynalda comes from message boards. Once again the documentation just is not on line yet. Hopefully as newspapers continue to digitize their archives more will become available, in the meantime, this is all there is.[1]Mohrflies 04:14, 23 June 2007 (UTC)
GOD I used to LOVE Soccer America Batman2005 11:42, 23 June 2007 (UTC)

Move to Germany[edit]

The following story is not online, I found it using a library search engine: Reject Kicks Bad Rap, Stars in Germany; Chicago Tribune, October 17, 1992, Phil Hersh.

“- February, 1992. Misses U.S. national team’s first game in 62 years against Brazil becaue he shows up at Miami airport without passport. Fined $1,000 by U.S. Soccer and has to pay own way back from Miami to California.

- May, 1992. Sent home from U.S. national team training in Denver by coach Bora Milutinovitc after elbowing a teammate in the face.

- June, 1992. Released by the San Francisco Bay Blackhawks of the American Professional Soccer League-one of the world’s weakest pro leagues-after contract dispute and hassles with teammates. . . .

“What? A tempestuous U.S. reject turning into one of the venerable Bundesliga’s hottest new players? . . .

“I’m not surprised at all by the fact an American can come over here and be successful,” said Wynalda via telephone from Saarbrucken, “It just happens to be me.” . . . the fact you are currently the most successful [American in Germany] is quite a surprise, indeed. . . . Wynalda, 23, of Westlake, Calif., was being written off as an enfant terrible.”

  • The article also provides detail on the initial loan arrangement and Saarbrucken's eventual purchase of Wynalda's contract from USSF.Mohrflies 12:44, 18 September 2007 (UTC)

Hollywood United[edit]

He has also continued to play with an over-30s amateur team in Los Angeles, Hollywood United, alongside former U.S. internationals Alexi Lalas and John Harkes, former French international Frank Leboeuf, former Welsh international player Vinnie Jones, and actor Anthony La Paglia.[12] United plays in the Los Angeles Olympic Soccer League.[13]

Hollywood United no longer plays in the Olympic Soccer League as it doesn't exist. They are now in the LA Metro Soccer League. Also, Waldo just turned 40 so he's probably been playing on the over-30's team. Jones and LaPaglia play on the over-40's "Dad's Army" team. Here's a picture of Dad's Army after winning the title last year. http://www.laparks.org/dos/sports/soccer/sum_fall08/divisionChamp.jpg

I'd update things but I don't have any current info. --EricPZ (talk) 17:51, 3 September 2009 (UTC)