Talk:Gush Emunim

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Untitled[edit]

A member of Gush Emunim, Haggai Segal, published a book on the group: Dear Brothers. The West Bank Jewish Underground (New York: Beit-Shamai, 1988), which has been discussed by Alan B. Krueger (Bendheim Professor of Economics and Politics at Princeton University and an advisor to the National Counterterrorism Center) in his recent Lionel Robbins Lectures entitled What Makes a Terrorist. Economics and the Roots of Terrorism (Princeton UP: Princeton and Oxford, 2007 – see pages 39 and following). As an editor, I happened to work on the Italian edition of the book by Krueger, therefore I add it this brief note for other to have the chance to possibly gather some more information from these 2 sources. Alessandro de Lachenal, Rome, Italy Jul 6, 2008 (UTC)


Most of the information in this article comes from the two listed sources at the bottom. I'm afraid that, while I can find particular references in these books to things that I wrote, I cannot chase sources like I normally would, as the best sources are almost entirely written in Hebrew.

Why did I write this article? It's a topic I'm interested in in passing, but mainly because somebody started an article on Jewish fundamentalism, and I've noticed that broad topics tend to be very bad until we get the facts written down in specific topics that can be necessarily more fact-based. DanKeshet 20:01 Feb 13, 2003 (UTC)


I changed the intro by removing the note "Today, however, no one uses the term Gush Emunim anymore ...".

The term is still in use. Abdul Sattar Qassem, Professor of Political Science at the Najah University in Nablus is quoted by Al Jazeera using the term in an article on their website titled, "Israel to US: Now for Iran" by Khalid Amayreh Sunday 29 August 2004, 14:00 Makka Time, 11:00 GMT. A link to the article is here. Aug 30, 2004

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I've read that one of the leading rabbis of this movement has said that it is not a crime or immoral to kill an arab. shouldn't this be included in the article? i think it is very significant since recent polls indicate that at least half of the people in Israel agree with that. Amirman 04:35, 6 March 2007 (UTC)

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Wouldn't it be of importance to include the fact that GE-leaders stated that non-Jews aren't human at all?

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This article ignores much of the impact of Gush Emunim, its relationship with the government, and its continued influence today. In addition, there is little depth to the section on its origins. It fails to mention when it was created (by Hanan Porat, in Kfar Etzion, on February 7, 1974) and really there are so many resources on GE that it seems stupid that this isn't a better article. By the way, GE doesn't exist anymore either. The issue of whether non-Jews are human is irrelevant, and untrue. GE ideology and politics are different things, and one can not mistake the two. Also, one leading rabbi of the movement does not the whole movement make - I doubt this idea something that is popular among those who follow the ideology. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 131.229.48.7 (talk) 02:54, 19 April 2010 (UTC)

"Judea and Samaria"[edit]

The lead attempted to equate the West Bank to Biblical Judea and Samaria. There are several problems, the first is that Judea and Samaria is a redirect to Judea and Samaria Area, which does not cover a biblical place name but rather the district that the Israeli military controls in the West Bank. The next is that the Judea and Samaria Area is not equivalent with the West Bank, it, for example, does not include East Jerusalem or any of the "ring neighborhoods". And finally, there is no such thing as "Biblical Judea and Samaria". There is a Biblical Judea and a Biblical Samaria. nableezy - 13:12, 20 November 2011 (UTC)

Yeah, but the chaps who have started crawling out to nibble at established consensus couldn't, I suspect, give a rodent's rectum for these distinctions. People have gotten bored with the consensus, and want the excitement of edit-wars, I imagine. There is some evidence that settlers are getting interested in challenging the status quo, and not only in Judea, and Samaria.Nishidani (talk) 13:21, 20 November 2011 (UTC)