Theodotus I of Constantinople

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"Theodotus I" and "Patriarch Theodotus I" redirect here. They could also refer to Theodotus of Antioch, patriarch of Antioch in 420–429.
Theodotos I Kassiteras
Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople
Consecration of Patriarch Theodotos Melissenos.jpg
Consecration of Theodotus as patriarch of Constantinople, miniature from the Madrid Skylitzes
Installed 815
Term ended 821

Theodotos I Kassiteras, Latinized as Theodotus I Cassiteras (Greek: Θεόδοτος Α΄ Κασσιτερᾶς or Κασσιτηρᾶς; died January 821) Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 1 April 815 to January 821.[1]

Theodotos was born in Nakoleia,[1] as the son of the patrikios Michael Melissenos by the sister of Eudokia, the last wife of Emperor Constantine V. Theodotos had become attached to the court bureaucracy and was a confidant of Emperor Michael I Rangabe.

By the time Michael I was deposed by Leo V the Armenian in 813, Theodotos was an elderly spatharokandidatos, whom the near-contemporary Scriptor Incertus describes as "meek" and "uneducated".[1] On 14 March 814, Leo forced the resignation of Patriarch Nikephoros I, and appointed the pro-iconoclast [Theodotos Melissenos in his place.[2] In 815, the new patriarch presided over a Church council in Constantinople, which overturned the Second Council of Nicaea and reinstated the ban on the veneration of icons, thus beginning the second period of Byzantine Iconoclasm.[1][3] Much of the Iconoclast effort in the council was driven by other clerics, including the later Patriarchs Antony I and John VII. In the aftermath of this synod Theodotos is representing as torturing by starvation at more than one iconodule abbot in an attempt to force them into agreement with his ecclesiastical policy.

He ceases to be mentioned in the sources after the murder of Leo V and accession of Michael II the Amorian in December 820.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e ODB, "Theodotos I Kassiteras" (A.–M. Talbot), p. 2054.
  2. ^ Treadgold 1988, pp. 212–213.
  3. ^ Treadgold 1988, p. 213.

Sources[edit]

  • Bury, John Bagnell (1912), A History of the Eastern Roman Empire from the Fall of Irene to the Accession of Basil I (A.D. 802–867), London: Macmillan and Co.
  • Kazhdan, Alexander, ed. (1991). The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-504652-8.
  • Treadgold, Warren T. (1988). The Byzantine Revival, 780–842. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-1896-2.
Titles of Chalcedonian Christianity
Preceded by
Nikephoros I
Patriarch of Constantinople
815–821
Succeeded by
Antony I