Trelagliptin

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Trelagliptin
Trelagliptin.svg
Clinical data
Trade names Zafatek
Identifiers
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
Formula C18H20FN5O2
Molar mass 475.470143 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)

Trelagliptin (Zafatek) is a pharmaceutical drug used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (diabetes mellitus).[1]

Indications[edit]

It is a highly selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor that is typically used as an add on treatment when the first line treatment of metformin is not achieving the expected glycemic goals; though it has been approved for use as a first line treatment when metformin cannot be used.[1]

Biochemistry[edit]

DPP-4 inhibitors activate T-cells and are more commonly known as T-cell activation antigens (specifically CD26).[1][2] Chemically, it is a fluorinated derivative of alogliptin.

Development[edit]

Formulated as the salt trelagliptin succinate, it was approved for use in Japan in March 2015.[3] Takeda, the company that developed trelagliptin, chose to not get approval for the drug in the USA and EU.[1] The licensing rights that Takeda purchased from Furiex Pharmaceuticals for DPP-4 inhibitors included a clause specific to development of this drug in the USA and EU.[1] The clause required that all services done for phase II and phase III clinical studies in the USA and EU be purchased through Furiex.[1] Takeda chose to cease development of this drug in the USA and EU because of the high costs quoted by Furiex for these services.[1] Gliptins have been on the market since 2006 and there are 8 gliptins currently registered as drugs (worldwide).[4] Gliptins are an emerging market and are thus being developed at an increasing rate; there are currently two gliptins in advanced stages of development that are expected to be on the market in the coming year.[4]

Gliptins are thought to have cardiovascular protective abilities though the extent of these effects is still being studied.[4] They are also being studied for the ability that this class of drugs has at promoting B-cell survival.[4]

Administration and dosing[edit]

Chemical structure of trelagliptin succinate

Similar drugs in the same class as trelagliptin are administered once daily while trelagliptin is administered once weekly.[1][5] Alogliptin (Nesina) is the other major DPP-4 inhibitor on the market. It is also owned by Takeda and is administered once daily. A dosing of once per week is advantageous as a reduction in the frequency of required dosing is known to increase patient compliance.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i McKeage, Kate (2015-06-27). "Trelagliptin: First Global Approval". Drugs. 75 (10): 1161–1164. doi:10.1007/s40265-015-0431-9. ISSN 0012-6667. PMID 26115728.
  2. ^ a b Inagaki, Nobuya; Onouchi, Hitoshi; Sano, Hiroki; Funao, Nobuo; Kuroda, Shingo; Kaku, Kohei. "SYR-472, a novel once-weekly dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a phase 2, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial". The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. 2 (2): 125–132. doi:10.1016/s2213-8587(13)70149-9.
  3. ^ "New Drug Application Approval of Zafatek® Tablets for the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes in Japan | Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited". www.takeda.com. Retrieved 2015-11-13.
  4. ^ a b c d Cahn, Avivit; Raz, Itamar (2013-06-01). "Emerging gliptins for type 2 diabetes". Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs. 18 (2): 245–258. doi:10.1517/14728214.2013.807796. ISSN 1472-8214. PMID 23725569.
  5. ^ Inagaki, Nobuya; Onouchi, Hitoshi; Maezawa, Hideaki; Kuroda, Shingo; Kaku, Kohei (2015). "Once-weekly trelagliptin versus daily alogliptin in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomised, double-blind, phase 3, non-inferiority study". The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. 3 (3): 191–197. doi:10.1016/s2213-8587(14)70251-7. PMID 25609193.