WorldSkills

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

WorldSkills is an international charity that organises world and national championships for vocational skills[1] and is held every two years in different parts of the world, and also hosts conferences about vocational skills.[2] WorldSkills describes itself as the global hub for skills.[3]

WorldSkills Abu Dhabi 2017

The aims of the competitions include demonstrating the advantages of learning a vocational skill,[4] and encouraging 'parity of esteem' between vocational and academic qualifications.[5]

The city of Kazan, Russia, hosted the 45th WorldSkills Competition in 2019. At the previous event, WorldSkills Abu Dhabi 2017, there were competitions in 51 skills areas with roughly 1,300 young people taking part.[6]

WorldSkills International, formerly known as the International Vocational Training Organization (IVTO), was founded in the 1940s with the goal of creating new employment opportunities for young people in some of the economies that were devastated by the Second World War.[7][8][9] It operates in 85 different countries and regions.[10]

Overview[edit]

WorldSkills rose out of the ruins of the Second World War, which devastated the economies of Europe and created a huge skills shortage that threatened a new economic depression. Some took this challenge as an opportunity to introduce young people to the world of vocational skills. Francisco Albert Vidal was charged with creating a skills contest for the youth of Spain and Portugal. Madrid 1950 was a modest event by today’s standards but an international movement was born. The competition grew rapidly. Young people from Germany, Great Britain, France, Morocco and Switzerland answered the call, with two competitors travelling to Spain unannounced and at their own expense. The competition moved abroad for the first time, to Brussels in Belgium. It was the start of the WorldSkills movement expanding across the globe. By the end of the 1960s, international competitions had been held in Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, the Netherlands and Switzerland. Then came the biggest leap so far with Tokyo as the host city for 1970. By the end of the 1980s, Atlanta in the USA, Sydney in Australia, Seoul in Korea, and Chinese Taipei had all welcomed what was becoming the world’s greatest international vocational skills event.[11]

Governed by an international Board of Directors and administered by the WorldSkills Secretariat, WSI's mission is "To raise the profile and recognition of skilled people, and show how important skills are in achieving economic growth and personal success".[3]

Among its main objectives are:

  • Promote the exchange between young professionals from various regions of the world.
  • Exchange of skills, experience and technological innovations.
  • Raise the understanding in governments, education and industry to the importance of skills training.
  • Raise the awareness of youth and those who influence youth to the opportunities available in skilled professions.

Medals are awarded during the competition: gold, silver and bronze. Medallions for Excellence are also awarded to those Competitors who achieve above-average scores in their contest areas.

Competitions[edit]

The WorldSkills Competition is currently held every two years.

Previous Competitions[edit]

Edition Year Host City Country Skills Countries
As International Vocational Training Organization (IVTO)
1 1950 Madrid  Spain
2 1951 Madrid  Spain
3 1953 Madrid  Spain
4 1955 Madrid  Spain
5 1956 Madrid  Spain
6 1957 Madrid  Spain
7 1958 Brussels  Belgium
8 1959 Modena  Italy
9 1960 Barcelona  Spain
10 1961 Duisburg  West Germany
11 1962 Gijón  Spain
12 1963 Dublin  Ireland
13 1964 Lisbon  Portugal
14 1965 Glasgow  United Kingdom
15 1966 Utrecht  Netherlands
16 1967 Madrid  Spain
17 1968 Bern  Switzerland
18 1969 Brussels  Belgium
19 1970 Tokyo  Japan
20 1971 Gijón  Spain
21 1973 Munich  West Germany
22 1975 Madrid  Spain
23 1977 Utrecht  Netherlands
24 1978 Busan  South Korea
25 1979 Cork  Ireland
26 1981 Atlanta  United States
27 1983 Linz  Austria
28 1985 Osaka  Japan
29 1988 Sydney  Australia
30 1989 Birmingham  United Kingdom
31 1991 Amsterdam  Netherlands
32 1993 Taipei Chinese Taipei
33 1995 Lyon  France
34 1997 St. Gallen  Switzerland
As WorldSkills International
35 1999 Montreal  Canada
36 2001 Seoul  South Korea
37 2003 St. Gallen  Switzerland
38 2005 Helsinki  Finland
39 2007 Shizuoka  Japan
40 2009 Calgary  Canada 45 51
41 2011 London  United Kingdom
42 2013 Leipzig  Germany
43 2015 São Paulo  Brazil 45 55
44 2017 Abu Dhabi  United Arab Emirates 51 59
45 2019 Kazan  Russia 56 63
46 2022 Shanghai  China
47 2024 Lyon  France

[12][13]


By country

Country Competitions hosted
 Spain 11 (1950, 1951, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1960, 1962, 1967, 1971, 1975)
 Netherlands 3 (1966, 1977, 1991)
  Switzerland 3 (1968, 1997, 2003)
 Japan 3 (1970, 1985, 2007)
 United Kingdom 3 (1965, 1989, 2011)
 Germany 3 (1961, 1973, 2013)
 Belgium 2 (1958, 1969)
 Ireland 2 (1963, 1979)
 South Korea 2 (1978, 2001)
 Canada 2 (1999, 2009)
 France 1 (1995) (Scheduled for 2024)
 Italy 1 (1959)
 Portugal 1 (1964)
 United States 1 (1981)
 Austria 1 (1983)
 Australia 1 (1988)
Chinese Taipei 1 (1993)
 Finland 1 (2005)
 Brazil 1 (2015)
 United Arab Emirates 1 (2017)
 Russia 1 (2019)
 China 0 (Scheduled for 2022)

WorldSkills Shanghai 2022[edit]

The 46th WorldSkills event will be held in Shanghai, as confirmed by the WorldSkills General Assembly in October 2017. The event was originally scheduled for September 2021, but due to the COVID-19 global pandemic, it was decided to shift the event to 2022.[14] The actual rescheduled date is not yet finalized but is expected to be held from 12 to 17 of October 2022, The slogan for WorldSkills Shanghai 2022 is “New Youth, New Skills, New Dream”.

Some WorldSkills Competition events took place in Cleveland, Ohio in October 2022.[15][16] while others took place in Salzburg, Austria and Finland.[17][18][19] WorldSkills Competition 2022 Special Edition was the official replacement for WorldSkills Shanghai 2022, cancelled in May due to the pandemic.

Future Competitions[edit]

WorldSkills Lyon 2024[edit]

Lyon, France was selected as the host city for the 47th WorldSkills competition.[20] Originally scheduled for 12–17 September 2023, it has been moved back one year due to the decision to postpone by one year the 46th Worldskills event originally scheduled to be held in 2021 due to the COVID-19 global pandemic.[21] This will be the second time that France has hosted the WorldSkills competition, the first time being in 1995.

Medals and awards[edit]

2015 Medal Table[edit]

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 South Korea (KOR)137525
2 Brazil (BRA)1110627
3 Chinese Taipei (TPE)57517
4 China (CHN)56415
5  Switzerland (SUI)17513
Totals (5 entries)35372597

2017 Medal Table[edit]

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 China (CHN)157830
2  Switzerland (SUI)116320
3 South Korea (KOR)88824
4 Brazil (BRA)75315
5 Russia (RUS)64111
Totals (5 entries)473023100

2019 Medal Table[edit]

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 China (CHN)1614535
2 Russia (RUS)144422
3 South Korea (KOR)76215
4 Chinese Taipei (TPE)55515
5 Brazil (BRA)25613
Totals (5 entries)443422100

2022 Medal Table[edit]

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 China (CHN)213428
2 South Korea (KOR)118928
3 Chinese Taipei (TPE)613625
4 Japan (JPN)65516
5 France (FRA)63716
Totals (5 entries)503231113

Members[edit]

List of the trades represented in WorldSkills[edit]

Construction and building technology[edit]

  1. Architectural Stone masonry
  2. Bricklaying
  3. Cabinetmaking
  4. Carpentry
  5. Concrete Construction Work
  6. Electrical Installations
  7. Joinery
  8. Landscape Gardening
  9. Painting and Decorating
  10. Plastering and Drywall Systems
  11. Plumbing and Heating
  12. Refrigeration and Air Conditioning
  13. Wall and Floor Tiling

Creative arts and fashion[edit]

  1. Fashion Technology
  2. Florist arts
  3. Graphic Design Technology
  4. Jewellery
  5. Visual Merchandising/Window Dressing
  6. 3D Digital Game Art

Information and communication technology[edit]

  1. Mobile Applications Development
  2. Cyber Security
  3. Cloud Computing
  4. Information Network Cabling
  5. IT Network Systems Administration
  6. IT Software Solutions for Business
  7. Print Media Technology
  8. Web Design

Manufacturing and engineering technology[edit]

  1. CNC Milling
  2. CNC Turning
  3. Construction Metal Work
  4. Electronics
  5. Industrial Control
  6. Industrial Mechanic Millwright
  7. Manufacturing Team Challenge
  8. Mechanical Engineering CAD
  9. Mechatronics
  10. Mobile Robotics
  11. Plastic Die Engineering
  12. Poly mechanics and Automation
  13. Prototype Modelling
  14. Welding
  15. Water Technology

Social and personal services[edit]

  1. Bakery
  2. Beauty Therapy
  3. Cooking
  4. Hairdressing
  5. Health and Social Care
  6. Pâtisserie and Confectionery
  7. Restaurant Service

Transportation and logistics[edit]

  1. Aircraft Maintenance
  2. Auto body Repair
  3. Automobile Technology
  4. Car Painting
  5. Heavy Vehicle Maintenance
  • The list was updated to reflect the trades that were covered at the 45th WorldSkills competition held in Kazan, Russia in August 2019.[22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Spindle, Bill. "The Thrill of Victory in Welding, Baking and Bricklaying". Esj.com. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  2. ^ Prabhakar, Eva. "Rebooting higher education: It's no longer one size fits all". Khaleejtimes.com. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Vision". Worldskills.org. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  4. ^ [1][dead link]
  5. ^ "Leaders of technical and vocational education and training to gather in Abu Dhabi for WorldSkills Conference 2017". Wam.ae. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  6. ^ "Looking for the world's best bricklayer and most perfect plumber at Abu Dhabi's skills Olympics". Thenational.ae. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  7. ^ "Seminar on '[n]ew directions of vocational training in the knowledge-based society' | VOCEDplus, the international tertiary education and research database". www.voced.edu.au. Retrieved 13 April 2023.
  8. ^ "History of WorldSkills". car-o-liner.com. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  9. ^ "WorldSkills International | UIA Yearbook Profile | Union of International Associations". uia.org. Retrieved 13 April 2023.
  10. ^ https://worldskills.org/members/
  11. ^ "About us | WorldSkills". worldskills.org. Retrieved 30 July 2023.
  12. ^ "Results". Worldskills.org. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  13. ^ "WorldSkills Abu Dhabi 2017 Results". Worldskillsabudhabi2017.com. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  14. ^ "S46th WorldSkills Competition postponed". WorldSkills. Retrieved 4 November 2020.
  15. ^ "USUE Student Bound for WorldSkills Welding Competition - ETV News". etvnews.com. 24 September 2022. Retrieved 13 April 2023.
  16. ^ McIntosh, Sean (13 October 2022). "Red Deer Polytechnic welding apprentice prepared for WorldSkills Competition - Red Deer Advocate". Red Deer Advocate. Retrieved 13 April 2023.
  17. ^ "Canadians win medals and medallions at WorldSkills competition - constructconnect.com". Daily Commercial News. 5 December 2022. Retrieved 13 April 2023.
  18. ^ Macinnis, Amie (17 November 2022). "RDP electrician headed to WorldSkills Competition in Austria". LacombeOnline. Retrieved 13 April 2023.
  19. ^ Goudie, Zach (18 October 2022). "Mad skills: St. John's hairstylist off to World Skills competition in Finland". CBC News. Retrieved 13 April 2023.
  20. ^ "Lyon to host the 47th WorldSkills Competition in 2023". worldskills.org. Retrieved 13 April 2023.
  21. ^ WorldSkills Competition postponed[permanent dead link]
  22. ^ "Skills". worldskills2019.com. Retrieved 6 March 2018.

External links[edit]