25th Legislative District (New Jersey)

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New Jersey's 25th Legislative district
New Jersey State Senator Anthony Bucco (R)
New Jersey General Assemblymembers Tony Bucco (R)
Michael Patrick Carroll (R)
Registration 34.3% Republican
23.1% Democratic
Demographics 82.4% White
4.1% Black/African American
0.2% Native American
6.0% Asian
0.0% Hawaiian/Pacific Islander
4.8% Other race
2.4% Two or more races
17.4% Hispanic
Population 215,844
Voting-age population 157,481
Registered voters 164,606

New Jersey's 25th Legislative District is one of 40 in the New Jersey Legislature. As of the 2011 apportionment, the district includes the Morris County municipalities of Boonton Town, Boonton Township, Chester Borough, Chester Township, Denville Township, Dover Town, Mendham Township, Mine Hill Township, Morris Township, Morristown Town, Mount Arlington Borough, Mountain Lakes Borough, Randolph Township, Rockaway Borough, Roxbury Township, Victory Gardens Borough, Washington Township and Wharton Borough; and the Somerset County municipality of Bernardsville Borough.[1][2]

Demographic characteristics[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, the district had a population of 215,844, of whom 164,606 (76.3%) were of voting age. The racial makeup of the district was 177,870 (82.4%) White, 8,957 (4.1%) African American, 462 (0.2%) Native American, 12,900 (6.0%) Asian, 64 (0.0%) Pacific Islander, 10,457 (4.8%) from some other race, and 5,134 (2.4%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 37,454 (17.4%) of the population.[3] The 25th District had 141,062 registered voters as of November 2013, of whom 60,084 (42.6%) were registered as Unaffiliated, 32,525 (23.1%) were registered as Democrats, 48,316 (34.3%) were registered as Republicans and 137 (0.1%) were registered to other parties.[4]

The district had high levels of income on average, but the communities of Dover, Mine Hill, Victory Gardens are well below the state average. The district had a high percentage of Hispanic residents, with Dover having some 60% of its residents as being of Hispanic origin. Registered Republicans outnumber Democrats by a nearly 2–1 margin.[5][6]

Apportionment history[edit]

Changes to the district made as part of the New Jersey Legislative apportionment in 2001, based on the results of the 2000 United States Census added Mountain Lakes Borough (from the 26th Legislative District) and removed Hanover Township (to the 26th Legislative District) and Harding Township (to the 21st Legislative District).[7]

As a consequence of the New Jersey Legislative apportionment in 2011, Jefferson Township and Rockaway Township were moved to District 26. The 25th District was shifted south and west, adding Morris County GOP strongholds Mendham Borough (from District 16), Chester Borough, Chester Township and Washington Township (from District 24); and Bernardsville in Somerset County (from District 16).

Political representation[edit]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the district is represented in the State Senate by Anthony Bucco (R, Boonton Town) and in the General Assembly by Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and Michael Patrick Carroll (R, Morris Township).[8][9]

Election history[edit]

William E. Bishop was elected in a special election held on April 20, 1982, to fill the vacancy left by James J. Barry, Jr., who had been named as Director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs by Governor of New Jersey Thomas Kean.[10]

In the 1993 general election, former Assemblymember Gordon MacInnes defeated Republican Incumbent John H. Dorsey by nearly 300 votes, making him the first Democrat in 18 years to win a legislative seat in Morris County .[11]

After Rodney Frelinghuysen took office in the United States House of Representatives in January 1995, Anthony Bucco was chosen by Morris County Republican county committee members to fill Frelinghuysen's vacant seat in the Assembly.[12] Bucco and Michael Patrick Carroll won the six-way June 1995 Republican primary to fill the district's two Assembly ballot spots, which became open when Arthur R. Albohn decided against running for re-election for a ninth term of office.[13]

In 1997, Anthony Bucco left the Assembly to successfully contest the Democratic-held Senate seat, with Rick Merkt taking the Assembly seat vacated by Bucco.[14]

With Rick Merkt running for the Republican nomination for governor in 2009, the 25th District saw a contested Republican primary with incumbent Michael Patrick Carroll facing Tony Bucco and Bucco's brother-in-law Douglas Cabana, a member of the Morris County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Bucco and Carroll won the two ballot spots and were elected in the general election.[15]

In 2011, Michael Patrick Carroll and Tony Bucco retained their seats in the Assembly, defeating Democratic challengers Gale Heiss-Colucci and George Stafford, while Anthony Bucco retained his Senate seat over challenger Rick Thoeni.[16]

Session State Senate[17] Assembly[18]
1976-1977 James Wallwork Jane Burgio Thomas Kean
1978-1979 James Wallwork Jane Burgio Frederic Remington
1980-1981 Jane Burgio Frederic Remington
1982-1983 John H. Dorsey Arthur R. Albohn James J. Barry, Jr.
1984-1985 John H. Dorsey Arthur R. Albohn Rodney Frelinghuysen
1986-1987 Arthur R. Albohn Rodney Frelinghuysen
1988-1989 John H. Dorsey Arthur R. Albohn Rodney Frelinghuysen
1990-1991[19] Arthur R. Albohn Rodney Frelinghuysen
1992-1993 John H. Dorsey Arthur R. Albohn Rodney Frelinghuysen
1994-1995[20] Gordon MacInnes Arthur R. Albohn Rodney Frelinghuysen
1996-1997 Anthony Bucco Michael Patrick Carroll
1998-1999[21] Anthony Bucco Michael Patrick Carroll Rick Merkt
2000-2001[22] Michael Patrick Carroll Rick Merkt
2002-2003[23] Anthony Bucco Michael Patrick Carroll Rick Merkt
2004-2005[24] Anthony Bucco Michael Patrick Carroll Rick Merkt
2006-2007 Michael Patrick Carroll Rick Merkt
2008-2009 Anthony Bucco Michael Patrick Carroll Rick Merkt
2010-2011[25] Tony Bucco Michael Patrick Carroll
2012-2013 Anthony Bucco Tony Bucco Michael Patrick Carroll
2014-2015[26] Anthony Bucco Tony Bucco Michael Patrick Carroll

References[edit]

  1. ^ Districts by Number, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  2. ^ Municipalities (sorted by 2011 legislative district), New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  3. ^ DP-1: Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 - 2010 Demographic Profile Data for General Assembly District 25 (2010), New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  4. ^ Statewide Voter Registration Summary, New Jersey Department of State, November 28, 2013. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  5. ^ District 25 Profile, Rutgers University. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  6. ^ 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book. Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. p. 114. 
  7. ^ Legislative Districts, New Jersey Legislature, backed up by the Internet Archive as of December 6, 1998. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  8. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  9. ^ District 25 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  10. ^ Staff. "FOR THE NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURE, 15 NEW FACES", The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 10, 1983. Accessed September 7, 2010. "Bishop filled the vacancy of Assemblyman James J. Barry Jr., who left the Assembly to become director of consumer affairs in the Kean administration."
  11. ^ Cichowski, John. "POWERFUL GOP SENATOR LOSES IN MORRIS -- DEMOCRAT MACINNES DEFEATS DORSEY IN SQUEAKER", The Record (Bergen County), November 3, 1993. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  12. ^ Cichowski, John. "GOP FILLS FRELINGHUYSEN'S SEAT", The Record (Bergen County), January 12, 1995. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  13. ^ Cichowski, John. "BUCCO WATCHES POLITICAL FORTUNES IMPROVE", The Record (Bergen County), June 8, 1995. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  14. ^ via Associated Press. "", The Press of Atlantic City, January 12, 1998. Accessed September 7, 2010. "Republican Rick Merkt won the Morris County seat left vacant by Bucco, and Republican Peter J. Biondi takes Kavanaugh's seat in Somerset County."
  15. ^ Melisurgo, Len. "Family feud in 25th District Assembly race in Morris County", The Star-Ledger, May 24, 2009. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  16. ^ Staff. "Somerset Hills voters support Republicans", The Bernardsville News, November 8, 2011. Accessed November 30, 2011.
  17. ^ NJ Senate District 25 - History, OurCampaigns.com. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  18. ^ NJ Assembly 25 - History, OurCampaigns.com. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  19. ^ Staff. "Vote Totals for the Elections Held on Tuesday in New York and New Jersey", The New York Times, November 9, 1989. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  20. ^ Sullivan, Joseph F. "THE 1993 ELECTIONS: New Jersey Legislature; Cut Taxes 30 Percent? Whitman's Top Statehouse Allies Say Not So Fast", The New York Times, November 4, 1993. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  21. ^ Staff. "THE 1997 ELECTIONS: RESULTS; The Races for the New Jersey Assembly", The New York Times, November 5, 1997. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  22. ^ Kocieniewski, David. "THE 1999 ELECTIONS: NEW JERSEY ASSEMBLY; Democrats Win Seats in Three Districts, Narrowing Republicans' Majority", The New York Times, November 3, 1999. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  23. ^ Staff. "THE 2001 ELECTIONS; RESULTS -- The Races for New Jersey", The New York Times, November 8, 2001. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  24. ^ Kocieniewski, David. "THE 2003 ELECTION: THE STATEHOUSE; Democrats Seize Senate And Widen Assembly Gap", The New York Times, November 5, 2003. Accessed June 23, 2010.
  25. ^ Staff. "2009 Election Results", The New York Times, November 9, 2009. Accessed September 7, 2010.
  26. ^ Official List; Candidates for General Assembly For GENERAL ELECTION 11/05/2013 Election, New Jersey Department of State, December 4, 2013. Accessed February 11, 2014.