Harding Township, New Jersey

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Harding Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Harding
The Wick House in Harding Township
The Wick House in Harding Township
Map highlighting Harding Township's location within Morris County. Inset: Morris County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Harding Township's location within Morris County. Inset: Morris County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Harding Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Harding Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°44′16″N 74°29′43″W / 40.737825°N 74.495335°W / 40.737825; -74.495335Coordinates: 40°44′16″N 74°29′43″W / 40.737825°N 74.495335°W / 40.737825; -74.495335[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated September 1, 1922
Named for Warren G. Harding
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Louis Lanzerotti (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator / Clerk Gail W. McKane[4][5]
Area[2]
 • Total 20.441 sq mi (52.942 km2)
 • Land 19.915 sq mi (51.580 km2)
 • Water 0.526 sq mi (1.362 km2)  2.57%
Area rank 140th of 566 in state
9th of 39 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 367 ft (112 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 3,838
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 3,880
 • Rank 421st of 566 in state
34th of 39 in county[12]
 • Density 192.7/sq mi (74.4/km2)
 • Density rank 509th of 566 in state
39th of 39 in county[12]
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07976 - New Vernon[13][14]
Area code(s) 973[15]
FIPS code 3402729700[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882195[18][2]
Website www.hardingnj.org

Harding Township is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population of the township was 3,838,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 658 (+20.7%) from the 3,180 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 460 (-12.6%) from the 3,640 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

The township contains two unincorporated communities, a portion of Green Village and all of New Vernon, both of which have origins as colonial settlements that predate the American Revolution. The governmental offices for the township are in New Vernon.

The 07976 ZIP code for New Vernon was named one of the "25 Richest Zip Codes" in the United States by Forbes magazine in 2006.[20] Many relatively unchanged large country estates that have been passed down through several generations attest to the wealth of many of its residents. Some have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places and some of those have nonprofit support organizations that assure the retention of the original nature of the properties.

Harding Township was formed as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on September 1, 1922, from portions of Passaic Township (now known as Long Hill Township), based on the results of a referendum passed on May 9, 1922.[21]

Geography[edit]

Harding Township is located at 40°44′16″N 74°29′43″W / 40.737825°N 74.495335°W / 40.737825; -74.495335 (40.737825,-74.495335). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 20.441 square miles (52.942 km2), of which, 19.915 square miles (51.580 km2) of it is land and 0.526 square miles (1.362 km2) of it (2.57%) is water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 1,206
1940 1,565 29.8%
1950 1,970 25.9%
1960 2,683 36.2%
1970 3,249 21.1%
1980 3,236 −0.4%
1990 3,640 12.5%
2000 3,180 −12.6%
2010 3,838 20.7%
Est. 2012 3,880 [11] 1.1%
Population sources:
1930[22] 1930-1990[23]
2000[24][25] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 3,838 people, 1,474 households, and 1,126 families residing in the township. The population density was 192.7 per square mile (74.4 /km2). There were 1,610 housing units at an average density of 80.8 per square mile (31.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 94.14% (3,613) White, 0.99% (38) Black or African American, 0.13% (5) Native American, 2.66% (102) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.34% (13) from other races, and 1.75% (67) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.49% (134) of the population.[8]

There were 1,474 households, of which 31.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.7% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.6% were non-families. 20.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.00.[8]

In the township, 24.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 14.5% from 25 to 44, 35.8% from 45 to 64, and 21.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48.9 years. For every 100 females there were 93.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.1 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $168,365 (with a margin of error of +/- $37,371) and the median family income was $185,647 (+/- $30,739). Males had a median income of $123,854 (+/- $38,454) versus $66,131 (+/- $25,727) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $109,472 (+/- $24,951). About 6.8% of families and 7.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.5% of those under age 18 and 3.3% of those age 65 or over.[26]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 3,180 people, 1,180 households, and 940 families residing in the township. The population density was 155.6 people per square mile (60.1/km²). There were 1,243 housing units at an average density of 60.8 per square mile (23.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 97.20% White, 0.41% African American, 1.07% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.22% from other races, and 1.07% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.79% of the population.[24][25]

There were 1,180 households out of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.3% were married couples living together, 5.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.3% were non-families. 17.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.03.[24][25]

In the township the population was spread out with 25.2% under the age of 18, 3.6% from 18 to 24, 21.9% from 25 to 44, 32.9% from 45 to 64, and 16.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.9 males.[24][25]

The median income for a household in the township was $111,297, and the median income for a family was $128,719. Males had a median income of $95,737 versus $57,308 for females. The per capita income for the township was $72,689. None of the families and 1.1% of the population were living below the poverty line, including none under eighteen and 3.3% of those over 64.[24][25]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Harding Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year.[6] At an annual reorganization meeting held during the first week of January, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

Eleven standing committees are appointed at the reorganization meeting including planning, zoning and legal; finance and insurance; public safety; public works and building; personnel; recreation commission; freeholder liaison; Glen Alpin Steering liaison; school board liaison; open space liaison; and board of health liaison. Two members of the township committee serve on each standing committee and provide oversight to the departments.

As of 2013, members of the Harding Township Committee are Committee Chair (Mayor) Louis J. Lanzerotti (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2014; term as mayor ends December 31, 2013), Committee Vice Chair (Deputy Mayor) Nicolas Platt (R, 2013), Nanette DiTosto (R, 2015), Alf Newlin (R, 2014) and Ned Ward (R, 2015).[27][28]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Harding Township is located in the 11th Congressional District[29] and is part of New Jersey's 27th state legislative district.[9][30][31] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Harding Township had been in the 21st state legislative district.[32]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[33] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[34][35] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[36][37]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 27th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Richard Codey (D, Roseland) and in the General Assembly by Mila Jasey (D, South Orange) and John F. McKeon (D, West Orange).[38][39] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[40] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[41]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Freeholder Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[42] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[43] As of 2014, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas Mastrangelo (Montville, term ends December 31, 2016),[44] Deputy Freeholder Director David Scapicchio (Mount Olive Township, 2015),[45] Douglas Cabana (Boonton Township, 2016),[46] John Cesaro (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2015),[47] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (Roxbury Township, 2016),[48] John Krickus (Washington Township, 2015)[49] and William "Hank" Lyon (Montville, 2014).[50][43][51] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[52] Sheriff Edward V. Rochford (Morris Plains, 2016)[53] and Surrogate John Pecoraro (Mendham Borough, 2014).[43][54]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 3,025 registered voters in Harding Township, of which 466 (15.4%) were registered as Democrats, 1,443 (47.7%) were registered as Republicans and 1,115 (36.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[55]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 61.9% of the vote here (1,516 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 36.7% (898 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (23 votes), among the 2,449 ballots cast by the township's 3,139 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.0%.[56] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 66.8% of the vote here (1,618 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 32.1% (778 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (20 votes), among the 2,421 ballots cast by the township's 3,040 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 79.6.[57]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 68.4% of the vote here (1,280 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 20.5% (384 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 10.5% (197 votes) and other candidates with 0.3% (5 votes), among the 1,871 ballots cast by the township's 3,099 registered voters, yielding a 60.4% turnout.[58]

Education[edit]

The Harding Township School District serves public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. Harding Township School had an enrollment of 306 students (as of the 2010-11 school year).[59]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Madison High School in Madison, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Madison Public Schools.[60]

History[edit]

After the retreat of the Wisconsin Glacier, a mighty glacial lake called Glacial Lake Passaic formed in this area that, about 15,000 to 11,000 years ago, extended for 30 miles (48 km) in length and was 10 miles (16 km) wide. The lake finally drained when a blockage of the Passaic River reopened. The Great Swamp is the remnant of the lake bottom and portions of the swamp lay in what now is the township. Once the lake drained, higher areas became a wooded area that was used for hunting, fishing, and farming by Native Americans. At the time of colonization by the Dutch it belonged to the Lenape tribes, but British colonists did their best to displace them westward.

Much of what now is known as Harding was an agricultural community with roots stretching as far back as the early 18th century. Bypassed by colonial turnpikes, revolution era canals, and railroads laid in the Victorian era, the area remained a rural backwater. For almost two centuries of European occupation, its open and rolling landscapes reflected its agricultural use, as land had been cleared for cattle pastures, orchards, and fields of grain.[61] The Great Swamp, the wooded slopes of the Watchung Mountains, and those near Jockey Hollow also were used by local farmers for wood supply. The communities of Green Village, Logansville, New Vernon, and Pleasantville were the village centers in this agricultural community.

Wealthy urban residents from Manhattan and Newark bought farmland, enlarged old farmhouses, and landscaped the grounds. The movement to establish Harding Township was driven by local property owners who wanted to maintain a bucolic community without suburban development.

The township was created in 1922 from the northern half of what was then Passaic Township (present day Long Hill Township) and it was named after the incumbent President of the United States, Warren G. Harding.[62]

The New Vernon Neighborhood Restrictive Agreement was established in 1928 by estate owners under which they agreed to voluntarily place restrictive covenants on their land that would require future owners of the properties to maintain the rural nature of the area.[63] This voluntary effort to limit development and save the pastoral qualities of over 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) across Harding Township influenced subsequent zoning codes, which emerged several decades later, and helped preserve the landscape to the present day.[61]

Noted residents[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Harding Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Administration, Harding Township. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  5. ^ Clerk, Harding Township. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 95.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Harding, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Harding township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Harding township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for New Vernon, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for New Vernon, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  20. ^ The Most Expensive ZIP Codes 2006, Forbes magazine April 21, 2006
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 193. Accessed October 26, 2012.
  22. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  23. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  24. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Harding township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  25. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Harding township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  26. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Harding township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  27. ^ Township Committee, Harding Township. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  28. ^ Morris County Manual 2013, p. 37. Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  29. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  30. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 58, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  31. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  32. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 58, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  33. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  34. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  35. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  36. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  37. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  38. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  39. ^ District 27 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  40. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  41. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  42. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed October 1, 2013.
  43. ^ a b c Morris County Manual 2014, Morris County Clerk. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  44. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  45. ^ David Scapicchio, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  46. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  47. ^ John Cesaro, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  48. ^ Kathryn A. DeFillippo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  49. ^ John Krickus, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  50. ^ William "Hank" Lyon, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  51. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  52. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Esq., Office of the Morris County Clerk. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  53. ^ About Us: Sheriff Edward V. Rochford, Morris County Sheriff's Office. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  54. ^ What is a Surrogate?, Morris County Surrogate Court. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  55. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  56. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  57. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  58. ^ 2009 Governor: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  59. ^ Data for the Harding Township School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  60. ^ Madison High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 11, 2013. "Madison High School also enjoys the benefits of our sending-receiving relationship with Harding Township, a nearby K-8 school district. Students from Harding and Madison become a cohesive class in their four years together."
  61. ^ a b c Garbarine, Rachelle. "If You're Thinking of Living in: Harding", The New York Times, June 10, 1990. Accessed February 28, 2008. "Among its residents are William E. Simon, the former Secretary of the Treasury, and Robert P. Luciano, the chairman of Schering-Plough, the pharmaceutical company."
  62. ^ Washington, Gregory C. "Town snapshot: Harding", The Star-Ledger, November 30, 2006. Accessed August 2, 2007. "When concluded, Passaic Township was cut in half and the northern half was named after the sitting president of the United States, Warren G. Harding."
  63. ^ Staff. "Harding Township", Observer Tribune. Accessed September 11, 2013. "The desire to preserve Harding’s rural character was evident even in 1928 when an unusual private land preservation effort began with the New Vernon Neighborhood Restrictive Agreement."
  64. ^ Kamin, Arthur Z. "State Becomes a Part of Celebrating Marconi's Achievements", The New York Times, October 23, 1994. Accessed December 2, 2012. "One of the council members is from New Jersey -- Dr. William O. Baker of New Vernon, the retired chairman of AT&T Bell Laboratories at Murray Hill."
  65. ^ Patterson, Mary Jo. "Local Man, Global Mission: Philanthropist Ray Chambers was appointed Special Envoy for malaria by the United Nation Secretary General in 2008, but he hasn't forgotten his humble Newark beginnings.", New Jersey Monthly, March 15, 2010. Accessed May 30, 2011. "Of all the causes Chambers has embraced, eradicating malaria has proved the most consuming. Last year, he spent only one week at his retreat in the Arizona desert, one of his and wife Patti’s four homes. (The others are in New Vernon, Manhattan, and California.)"
  66. ^ Bataille, Larry. About, Hartley Farms. Accessed June 16, 2013.
  67. ^ "North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority | NJTPA Update: December 2013". NJTPA. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  68. ^ "Regina Egea resigns from Harding Township Committee - New Jersey Hills Newspaper: Observer-Tribune News". Newjerseyhills.com. January 27, 2012. Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  69. ^ Staff. "SPORTS PEOPLE: TENNIS;Gimelstob Takes Shot at the Pros", The New York Times, May 16, 1996. Accessed September 3, 2007. "The first pro tournament for the 19-year-old U.C.L.A. sophomore from Harding Township, N.J., will be the Stella Artois Grass Court Championships in London in June."
  70. ^ Board of Trustees, The Land Conservancy of New Jersey. Accessed May 30, 2011. "Kerry Kittles is a retired professional basketball player with the New Jersey Nets. He is currently pursing an MBA in Finance at Villanova University. Kerry lives in Harding Township with his wife, Adria and their three daughters."
  71. ^ "New York Jets coach buys $4M Harding Twp. home", Daily Record (Morristown), July 31, 2008. Accessed August 21, 2008.
  72. ^ Staff. "Two BYU Alumni Win Dissertation Awards", Marriott Alumni Magazine, Winter 2008. Accessed November 23, 2008. "In addition, Oates leads community initiatives such as the New Jersey Hall of Fame and the Teach Our Children Foundation, an organization committed to educating inner-city children. He and his wife, Michelle, have three children and live in Harding, New Jersey."

External links[edit]