Butler, New Jersey

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Butler, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Butler
Butler highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Butler highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Butler, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Butler, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°59′53″N 74°20′56″W / 40.998059°N 74.348758°W / 40.998059; -74.348758Coordinates: 40°59′53″N 74°20′56″W / 40.998059°N 74.348758°W / 40.998059; -74.348758[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated March 13, 1901
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Robert W. Alviene (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator James Lampmann[4]
 • Clerk Mary O'Keefe[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.089 sq mi (5.410 km2)
 • Land 2.036 sq mi (5.273 km2)
 • Water 0.053 sq mi (0.137 km2)  2.53%
Area rank 403rd of 566 in state
35th of 39 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 456 ft (139 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 7,539
 • Estimate (2013[11]) 7,618
 • Rank 304th of 566 in state
25th of 39 in county[12]
 • Density 3,703.2/sq mi (1,429.8/km2)
 • Density rank 170th of 566 in state
7th of 39 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07405[13][14]
Area code(s) 973[15]
FIPS code 3402709040[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885175[18][2]
Website www.butlerborough.com

Butler is a borough in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 7,539,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 119 (+1.6%) from the 7,420 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 28 (+0.4%) from the 7,392 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Butler was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 13, 1901, from portions of Pequannock Township.[20]

Geography[edit]

Butler is located at 40°59′53″N 74°20′56″W / 40.998059°N 74.348758°W / 40.998059; -74.348758 (40.998059,-74.348758). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.089 square miles (5.410 km2), of which, 2.036 square miles (5.273 km2) of it was land and 0.053 square miles (0.137 km2) of it (2.53%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 2,265
1920 2,886 27.4%
1930 3,392 17.5%
1940 3,351 −1.2%
1950 4,050 20.9%
1960 5,414 33.7%
1970 7,051 30.2%
1980 7,616 8.0%
1990 7,392 −2.9%
2000 7,420 0.4%
2010 7,539 1.6%
Est. 2013 7,618 [11] 1.0%
Population sources: 1910-1920[21]
1910[22][23] 1910-1930[24]
1900-2010[25] 2000[26][27] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,539 people, 3,031 households, and 1,976 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,703.2 per square mile (1,429.8 /km2). There were 3,169 housing units at an average density of 1,556.6 per square mile (601.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 88.95% (6,706) White, 1.11% (84) Black or African American, 0.16% (12) Native American, 3.02% (228) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 4.95% (373) from other races, and 1.80% (136) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 11.41% (860) of the population.[8]

There were 3,031 households, of which 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.8% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.8% were non-families. 28.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.06.[8]

In the borough, 20.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 28.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.2 years. For every 100 females there were 100.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.6 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $78,614 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,375) and the median family income was $102,435 (+/- $7,072). Males had a median income of $69,407 (+/- $4,399) versus $46,286 (+/- $4,815) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,678 (+/- $3,263). About 3.2% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.6% of those under age 18 and 1.3% of those age 65 or over.[28]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 7,420 people, 2,868 households, and 2,024 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,568.9 people per square mile (1,377.3/km2). There were 2,923 housing units at an average density of 1,405.9 per square mile (542.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.89% White, 0.62% African American, 0.20% Native American, 1.85% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.48% from other races, and 0.94% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.11% of the population.[26][27]

There were 2,868 households out of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.8% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.4% were non-families. 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.09.[26][27]

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.7% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 33.8% from 25 to 44, 24.2% from 45 to 64, and 13.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 97.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.7 males.[26][27]

The median income for a household in the borough was $57,455, and the median income for a family was $66,199. Males had a median income of $45,975 versus $35,815 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,113. About 2.5% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.2% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over.[26][27]

History[edit]

The area now known as Butler was originally called "West Bloomingdale" and was sparsely populated. Water power brought manufacturing entities to the area. In 1857, The Pequannock Valley Paper Company moved from Bergen County and in 1868 the Newbrough Hard Rubber Company built a factory, both based along the Pequannock River. These were two significant economic entities that contributed to the growth of the Borough. In 1871, the New Jersey Midland Railroad extended track through Butler from Paterson, making an important transportation connection for both passengers and freight. The northern terminus for the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway's passenger service was located at Butler until 1966. The railroad still carries freight through Butler.

The growing town was given the name "Butler" in 1881 after Richard Butler, who had taken ownership of the Hard Rubber Company. A Post Office was established and a larger railroad station was built. This station has been the Borough Museum since about 1977. The Hard Rubber Company eventually merged with other businesses and became the American Hard Rubber Company in 1898. A "Soft" Rubber Company built a factory just along Main Street. The town continued to grow as other factories and supporting businesses were established. The population in 1920 was 2,265 people. By 1950, it was 4,063.

Butler's largest fire began just after midnight, February 26, 1957, when one of the nation's largest rubber reclaiming mills (Pequanoc Rubber Company, Main Street) was destroyed by a blaze estimated to have caused a loss of as much as $3 million at the time. The mill occupied the site on upper Main Street, an irregular shaped complex 600 feet by 300 feet and 3 to 4 stories high; it produced over 100 tons of reusable sheet rubber daily from 200 tons of scrap. One Butler Heights resident remembers the fire being so bright she could read a newspaper in her yard at 3am at a distance of a mile. The glow reportedly was visible for 100 miles, mutual aid response was required by volunteer fire companies from a dozen nearby fire companies.[29]

Numerous organizations exist in town and, along with the neighboring towns of Kinnelon and Bloomingdale, many "Tri-Boro" organizations serve the area, including the local Little League & Volunteer First Aid Squad.

Butler was the location of a health resort run by Benedict Lust called "Yungborn" that opened on September 15, 1896.[30]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Butler is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Butler is Republican Robert W. Alviene, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Edwin Vath (R, 2013), Robert Fox (R, 2015), Sean McNear (R, 2014), Robert Meier (R, 2015), Stephen Regis (R, 2013) and Raymond Verdonik (R, 2014).[31][32][33]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Butler is located in the 11th Congressional District[34] and is part of New Jersey's 26th state legislative district.[9][35][36]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[37] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[38][39] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[40][41]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 26th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph Pennacchio (R, Montville) and in the General Assembly by BettyLou DeCroce (R, Parsippany-Troy Hills) and Jay Webber (R, Morris Plains) and [42][43] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[44] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[45]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Freeholder Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[46] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[47] As of 2014, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas Mastrangelo (Montville, term ends December 31, 2016),[48] Deputy Freeholder Director David Scapicchio (Mount Olive Township, 2015),[49] Douglas Cabana (Boonton Township, 2016),[50] John Cesaro (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2015),[51] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (Roxbury Township, 2016),[52] John Krickus (Washington Township, 2015)[53] and William "Hank" Lyon (Montville, 2014).[54][47][55] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[56] Sheriff Edward V. Rochford (Morris Plains, 2016)[57] and Surrogate John Pecoraro (Mendham Borough, 2014).[47][58]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,551 registered voters in Butler, of which 863 (19.0%) were registered as Democrats, 1,458 (32.0%) were registered as Republicans and 2,224 (48.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 6 voters registered to other parties.[59]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 55.1% of the vote here (1,968 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 43.7% (1,561 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (32 votes), among the 3,573 ballots cast by the borough's 4,759 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.1%.[60] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 57.4% of the vote here (1,986 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 41.4% (1,430 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (26 votes), among the 3,458 ballots cast by the borough's 4,822 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 71.7.[61]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 56.9% of the vote here (1,286 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 33.4% (755 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.0% (159 votes) and other candidates with 1.5% (33 votes), among the 2,260 ballots cast by the borough's 4,615 registered voters, yielding a 49.0% turnout.[62]

Education[edit]

The Butler Public Schools serves students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment from the National Center for Education Statistics[63]) are Aaron Decker School[64] for grades K-4 (371 students), Richard Butler School[65] for grades 5-8 (243) and Butler High School[66] for grades 9-12 (516).[67]

Students from Bloomingdale attend Butler High School as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Bloomingdale School District.[68][69]

St. Anthony of Padua School was a Catholic school operated under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson that was closed in June 2012 in the face of declining enrollment having served the community for 130 years.[70][71]

Transportation[edit]

The former Butler station (for the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railroad) as seen in August 2011 just before Hurricane Irene

New Jersey Transit bus service is provided on the 194 route to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan and on the 75 to/from Newark.[72]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Butler include:

Points of Interest[edit]

  • The Butler Museum- located on Main Street in the former NYS&W railroad station. It is across from 234 Main Street. The museum houses exhibits that reflects on the town's history. [1]
  • Meadtown Shopping Center- a shopping center located between Butler and Kinnelon. It has stores and restaurants and also includes a New York Sports Club and Bowtie Cinemas. It formerly housed a bowling alley.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Administrator, Butler Borough. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk, Butler Borough. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 121.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Butler, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Butler borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Butler borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Butler, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Butler, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 27, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 191. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  21. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  22. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 17, 2012. For 1890 a population of 3,307 is listed.
  23. ^ Lundy, F. L.; Fitzgerald, Thomas F.; Gosson, Louis C.; Fitzgerald, Josephine A.; Dullard, John P.; Gribbins, J. Joseph. Fitzgerald's legislative manual, State of New Jersey, Volume 139, p. 163. J.A. Fitzgerald, 1915. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  24. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  25. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed March 12, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Butler borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Butler borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  28. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Butler borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  29. ^ via Associated Press. "$2,000,000 Fire Set Off by Blast Destroys New Jersey Rubber Plant", The New York Times, February 27, 1957. Accessed July 1, 2011. "A fire that started early today in a drying-room explosion destroyed the plant of the Pequanoc Soft Rubber Company, causing a loss estimated at $2,000,000 to $3,000,000."
  30. ^ a b Whorton, James C. Nature cures: the history of alternative medicine in America, p. 198, Oxford University Press, 2002. ISBN 0-19-514071-0. Accessed July 1, 2011.
  31. ^ Town Council, Butler Borough. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  32. ^ Town Council, Butler Borough. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  33. ^ Morris County Manual 2013, p. 27. Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  34. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 55, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  38. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  39. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  40. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  41. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  42. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  43. ^ District 26 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  44. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  45. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed October 1, 2013.
  47. ^ a b c Morris County Manual 2014, Morris County Clerk. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  48. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  49. ^ David Scapicchio, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  50. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  51. ^ John Cesaro, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  52. ^ Kathryn A. DeFillippo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  53. ^ John Krickus, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  54. ^ William "Hank" Lyon, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  55. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  56. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Esq., Office of the Morris County Clerk. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  57. ^ About Us: Sheriff Edward V. Rochford, Morris County Sheriff's Office. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  58. ^ What is a Surrogate?, Morris County Surrogate Court. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  59. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  60. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  61. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  62. ^ 2009 Governor: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  63. ^ Data for the Butler Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 17, 2012.
  64. ^ Aaron Decker School, Butler Public Schools. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  65. ^ Richard Butler School, Butler Public Schools. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  66. ^ Butler High School, Butler Public Schools. Accessed July 25, 2013.
  67. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Butler Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  68. ^ Butler Public School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 7, 2013. "The district also engages in several Shared Service agreements with the Bloomingdale school district, beyond the send-receive high school experience, including sharing of school Library oversight, Special Education and sharing the services of the Student Assistance Counselor. "
  69. ^ Lee, Michelle. "Proposal to merge Butler, Bloomingdale school chiefs snagged on state pay-cap", The Record (Bergen County), February 20, 2011. Accessed July 2, 2011. "Lauren Grecco, Bloomingdale school board president, said the trustees came up with the shared superintendent idea last fall with the goals of saving money and better-aligning curriculum. Bloomingdale students attend Butler High School, and the districts share a librarian and a buildings-and-grounds supervisor."
  70. ^ Morris County Elementary / Secondary Schools, Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson. Accessed July 26, 2008.
  71. ^ Staff. "Controversy rises over St. Anthony's closure in Butler - See more at: http://www.northjersey.com/news/160635075_Saint_Anthony_s_School__closing_after_130_years__.html#sthash.lcKC0AGd.dpuf", Suburban Trends, June 28, 2012. Accessed July 25, 2013. "With the St. Anthony of Padua Elementary School having reportedly closed its doors forever with the end of this school year, a fight is brewing between the priest who, in light of falling enrollment, made the decision to end the school’s 130-year run, and various parents and parishioners who say that he abandoned the school too soon."
  72. ^ Morris County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed July 1, 2011.
  73. ^ Staff. "Kurt Adler, 70, Conductor Of 20 Different Operas At Met During 22 Years", The New York Times, September 22, 1977. Accessed July 2, 2011. "Kurt Adler, opera conductor and chorusmaster of the, Metropolitan Opera from 1945 through 1973, died yesterday after a long illness. He was 70 years old and lived in Butler, N.J."
  74. ^ McLeod, Don. "First sub-Arctic type: Marine lab opens in May", Leader-Post, September 29, 1966. Accessed July 2, 2011. "Dr. Aldrich, 39-year-old native of Butler, N.J., who came to Memorial five years ago from the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia, expects to have a staff of eventually 100, probably 48 of them senior researchers."
  75. ^ Frederick A. Aldrich, Memorial University of Newfoundland. Accessed July 2, 2011. "Frederick Allen Aldrich, AB, M.Sc., PhD, was born in Butler, New Jersey, on May 1, 1927. Following the award of his doctorate in marine biology and physiology from Rutgers University, he served for seven years as curator of invertebrates at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia."
  76. ^ Martin, Douglas. "Harry L. Sears, 82, Politician And Courier for Vesco Cash", The New York Times, May 21, 2002. Accessed July 2, 2011. "Harry Lloyd Sears Jr. was born on Jan. 16, 1920, in Butler, N.J. He graduated from Tusculum College in Greeneville, Tenn., and Rutgers University Law School. He was elected to the General Assembly in 1961 and was re-elected every two years until he ran successfully for the Senate in 1967."

External links[edit]