302d Operations Group

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302d Operations Group
Air Force Reserve Command.png
C-130 Return Home.jpg
Lockheed C-130 with Pikes Peak in the background
Active 1942–1944; 1949–1951; 1952–1959; 1992–present
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Role Airlift
Decorations Air Force Outstanding Unit Award
Insignia
302d Operations Group emblem (approved 27 February 1943)[1] 302doperationsgroup-emblem.jpg
C-130 at Sather Air Base, Iraq

The 302d Operations Group is the operational flying component of the 302d Airlift Wing of the United States Air Force Reserve. It is stationed at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado.

The group was activated during World War II as the 302d Bombardment Group, a Consolidated B-24 Liberator replacement training unit (RTU). It was originally a Second Air Force unit, it was reassigned to First Air Force in 1943. The group was inactivated in 1944 when the Army Air Forces reorganized its training units to make more efficient use of its manpower.

The group was redesignated the 302d Troop Carrier Group and activated in the Air Force Reserve in 1949. The group was called to active duty in June 1951 and its personnel used as fillers for other units before the 302d was inactivated a week later.

The group was again activated in the reserves in 1952 and trained as an airlift unit until it was inactivated in 1958 when Continental Air Command converted its operational wings to the dual deputy system in which squadrons reported ddirectly to wing headquarters.

The group was activated again when Air Force Reserve Command reorganized under the Combat Wing reorganization.

Mission[edit]

The 302 OG consists of one C-130 Hercules squadron, the 731st Airlift Squadron, which has the Modular Airborne Fire Fighting System mission. The group's personnel take part in tactical airlift training exercises and contingency and humanitarian airlift operations, both at home and abroad.[2]

History[edit]

The group was activated during World War II as the 302d Bombardment Group, a Consolidated B-24 Liberator replacement training unit (RTU). It was originally a Second Air Force unit, it was reassigned to First Air Force in 1943. The group was inactivated in 1944 when the Army Air Forces reorganized its training units to make more efficient use of its manpower.

The group was redesignated the 302d Troop Carrier Group and activated in the Air Force Reserve in 1949. The group was called to active duty in June 1951 and its personnel used as fillers for other units before the 302d was inactivated a week later.

The group was again activated in the reserves in 1952 and trained as an airlift unit until it was inactivated in 1958 when Continental Air Command converted its operational wings to the dual deputy system in which squadrons reported ddirectly to wing headquarters.

The group was activated again in 1992 when Air Force Reserve Command reorganized under the Combat Wing reorganization.

Lineage[edit]

  • Constituted as the 302 Bombardment Group (Heavy) on 28 January 1942
Activated on 1 June 1942
Inactivated on 10 April 1944
  • Redesignated 302 Troop Carrier Group, Medium on 16 May 1949
Activated in the reserve on 27 June 1949
  • Redesignated 302 Troop Carrier Group, Heavy on 28 January 1950
Ordered to active service on 1 June 1951
Inactivated on 8 June 1951
  • Redesignated 302 Troop Carrier Group, Medium on 26 May 1952
Activated in the reserve on 14 June 1952
Inactivated on 14 April 1959
  • Redesignated 302 Tactical Airlift Group on 31 July 1985 (Remained inactive)
  • Redesignated: 302 Operations Group on 1 August 1992 and activated in the reserve[2]

Assignments[edit]

Components[edit]

Stations[edit]

Aircraft[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1983) [1961]. Air Force Combat Units of World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. pp. 174–175. ISBN 0-912799-02-1. LCCN 61060979. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Robertson, Patsy (2010-08-31). "Factsheet 302 Operations Group (AFRC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved January 27, 2014. 

Bibliography[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

External links[edit]