30s

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Note: Sometimes the '30s is used as shorthand for the 1930s, the 1830s, or other such decades in various centuries – see List of decades
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 1st century BC1st century2nd century
Decades: 0s 10s 20s30s40s 50s 60s
Years: 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39
Categories: BirthsDeathsArchitecture
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

This is a list of events occurring in the 30s, ordered by year.

30[edit]

By place[edit]

India[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Arts and sciences[edit]

31[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]


32[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

  • Saint Peter traditionally becomes first pope (see 30 for more likely date).
  • Symbolic interpretation of the OT by Philo (Allegory).
  • Crucifixion of Jesus (traditional date).

33[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

  • Servius Sulpicius Galba is a Roman Consul.[2]
  • Emperor Tiberius founds a credit bank in Rome.[3]
  • A financial crisis hits Rome, due to poorly chosen fiscal policies. Land values plummet, and credit is increased. These actions lead to a lack of cash, a crisis of confidence, and much land speculation. The primary victims are senators, knights and the wealthy. Many aristocratic families are ruined.

China[edit]


34[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

35[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

Asia[edit]

36[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

Mesoamerica[edit]

37[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

38[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

By topic[edit]

Arts and sciences[edit]

Religion[edit]

39[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Empire[edit]

Asia[edit]


Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ johnpratt.com
  2. ^ Bunson, Matthew (2002). Encyclopedia of the Roman Empire (2nd ed.). Infobase Publishing. p. 226. ISBN 978-0-8160-4562-4. 
  3. ^ Harris, W. V. (2011). Rome's Imperial Economy: Twelve Essays. Oxford University Press. p. 238. ISBN 978-0-19-959516-7. 
  4. ^ Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews 18.113–126; Bruce, F. F. (1963–1965). "Herod Antipas, Tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea" (PDF). Annual of Leeds University Oriental Society 5: 6–23, pp. 17–18. Retrieved 2007-10-21. 
  5. ^ Bowman, Alan K.; Champlin, Edward; Lintott, Andrew (1996). The Cambridge ancient history: The Augustan Empire, 43 B.C.–A.D. 69. Cambridge University Press. p. 221. ISBN 978-0-521-26430-3. 
  6. ^ Downey, Glanville (1961). A history of Antioch in Syria: from Seleucus to the Arab conquest. Princeton University Press. p. 190. 
  7. ^ Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews 18.247–252; Bruce, F. F. (1963–1965). "Herod Antipas, Tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea" (PDF). Annual of Leeds University Oriental Society 5: 6–23, p. 21. Retrieved 2007-10-21.