Alamo, Tennessee

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Alamo, Tennessee
Town
Location of Alamo, Tennessee
Location of Alamo, Tennessee
Coordinates: 35°47′3″N 89°6′57″W / 35.78417°N 89.11583°W / 35.78417; -89.11583Coordinates: 35°47′3″N 89°6′57″W / 35.78417°N 89.11583°W / 35.78417; -89.11583
Country United States
State Tennessee
County Crockett
Incorporated 1911[1]
Named for Battle of the Alamo
Area
 • Total 2.2 sq mi (5.6 km2)
 • Land 2.2 sq mi (5.6 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 361 ft (110 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 2,461
 • Density 1,100/sq mi (440/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 38001
Area code(s) 731
FIPS code 47-00440[2]
GNIS feature ID 1304782[3]

Alamo is a town in Crockett County, Tennessee. Its population was 2,461 at the time of the 2010 U.S. Census. Alamo, for historical reasons, is the county seat of Crockett County (see Davy Crockett and the Alamo). Alamo is located in the central part of West Tennessee, about 30 miles from the Mississippi River.

History[edit]

In 1847, Alamo was known as Cageville. Cageville's first merchant serves as its namesake: Licurgus Cage. By 1845 the town had been laid out, and in 1869 the name Alamo replaced Cageville as a memorial to Davy Crockett and those who died at Battle of the Alamo. Alamo was incorporated in 1911.[4]

Geography[edit]

Alamo is located at 35°47′3″N 89°6′57″W / 35.78417°N 89.11583°W / 35.78417; -89.11583 (35.784201, -89.115729).[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 2.2 square miles (5.7 km2), all land.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 720
1930 907 26.0%
1940 1,137 25.4%
1950 1,501 32.0%
1960 1,665 10.9%
1970 2,499 50.1%
1980 2,615 4.6%
1990 2,426 −7.2%
2000 2,392 −1.4%
2010 2,461 2.9%
Est. 2012 2,460 0.0%
Sources:[6][7]

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 2,392 people, 945 households, and 605 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,112.5 people per square mile (429.6/km²). There were 1,076 housing units at an average density of 500.5 per square mile (193.2/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 76.25% White, 21.32% African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 1.42% from other races, and 0.75% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.34% of the population.

There were 945 households out of which 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.0% were married couples living together, 16.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.9% were non-families. 33.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the town the population was spread out with 23.8% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 20.2% from 45 to 64, and 22.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 81.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.5 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $25,750, and the median income for a family was $38,295. Males had a median income of $26,167 versus $21,650 for females. The per capita income for the town was $14,146. About 16.1% of families and 20.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.9% of those under age 18 and 23.8% of those age 65 or over.

Notable residents[edit]

Historian Charles P. Roland, a native of Crockett County and specialist in the American Civil War and the American South, taught at Alamo High School from 1938 to 1940.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tennessee Blue Book, 2005-2006, pp. 618-625.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ Larry L. Miller (October 2001). Tennessee place names. Indiana University Press. pp. 3–4. ISBN 978-0-253-21478-2. Retrieved 21 November 2011. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "Census of Population and Housing: Decennial Censuses". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-03-04. 
  7. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Resident Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 11 December 2013. 
  8. ^ Who's Who in America, 1982-1983 (Chicago, Illinois: Marquis Who's Who, 1982), p. 2844