FC Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk

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This article is about the Ukrainian football club. For the European river, see Dnieper River.
FC Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk
FC Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk.svg
Full name Football Club Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk
Founded 1918; 96 years ago (1918)
Ground Dnipro-Arena, Dnipropetrovsk
Ground Capacity 31,003
President Ihor Kolomoyskyi
Head coach Myron Markevych
League Ukrainian Premier League
2013–14 2nd
Website Club home page

Football Club Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk (Ukrainian: Футбо́льний Клуб Дніпро́ Дніпропетро́вськ) is a Ukrainian professional football club based in Dnipropetrovsk.

Dnipro which is the name of Dnieper river in Ukraine is a popular sports name in Dnipropetrovsk. Beside the association football club there also is a bandy team under the same name,[1] basketball team and others. However, FC Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk is not a multi-sport club. The club is owned by the Privat Group that also owns BC Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk and Budivelnyk Kyiv.

During the Soviet Union the club was a member of the Soviet Volunteer Sports Society "Metallurg" (therefore it carried names Metallurg and Stal) and until 1961 was under sponsorship of the Petrovsky Dnipropetrovsk Metallurgical Plant. After that the club was sponsored by the Southern Machine-building Plant Yuzhmash. Sometime after the fall of the Soviet Union, the club was privatized.

History[edit]

BRIT[edit]

The club's franchise traces its history all the way back when the first team that was formed in 1918 by the Petrovsky factory and was called as BRIT (Brianskyi Robitnychyi Industrialnyi Tekhnikum). The team participated in the regional competition (Katerynoslav championship). With the four other teams BRIT played its games on small stadium "Sokil" which was located at the corner of Pushkin street and Yuriy Savchenko street.

Petrovets – Stal – Metalurh[edit]

Due to World War I, BRIT was disbanded, but on 9 May 1925 a new team was formed in Dnipropetrovsk (coincidentally, later the day became to be known as the Victory Day). The team participated under a generic name as football team of Petrovsky factory. The official name it received in 1926 when it became to be known as "Petrovets". The team entered the first Soviet competition under the name of Stal (steel, En) in 1936 in one of the lower divisions. The team participated in the three championship before World War II. After the war, in 1947, the team reentered the Soviet competition and was merged with another club from Dnipropetrovsk, Dynamo Dnipropetrovsk. From 1949 until 1961, the team was called Metalurh (from English metal worker). During this time the team participated for three seasons, 1950–1952, among the amateurs due to poor results. In 1954, Metalurh Dnipropetrovsk reached the semi-finals of the USSR Cup, where it lost to Spartak Yerevan.

Dnepr[edit]

In 1961, the team was handed over to its new sponsor, the Yugmash (the Southern machine-producing factory), which at that time was one of the most powerful factories in the entire Soviet Union and was funded by the Ministry of Defense. It was part of the Zenit volunteer sports society. The new sponsor changed the team's name to the Russian name of Dnepr, Dnieper, as the Russian was the accepted language of the Soviet Union and the Soviet government. The team's performance did not change much until after 1968, when Dnepr obtained Andriy Biba and the new coach – Valery Lobanovsky. After that it took the team three years to get promoted to the Soviet Top League and eventually took sixth place in 1972.

Golden generation[edit]

In 1973 and 1976 Dnepr reached the semi-finals of the USSR Cup competition. In 1978 the team was relegated to the lower league for two years. Their next return to the top flight was not as inviting as their first one and the team languished at the bottom of the table for several years. In the following years, the governing body of the team hired new promising coaches – Volodymyr Yemets and Hennadiy Zhizdik. After those changes, Dnepr became a strong contender for the Soviet championship winning it twice: once with Yemets and Zhizdik in 1983, and another one with Yevhen Kucherevsky in 1988. Also, in 1989 Dnepr became the first professional football club in the Soviet Union. During those years, the team featured many notable players such as Oleg Protasov, Hennadiy Litovchenko, Oleksiy Cherednyk, and Oleh Taran.

Dnipro[edit]

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, the club took on the Ukrainian version name of Dnipro, the name of the biggest river and one of the major symbols of Ukraine. The club joined the football federation of the native country and remained one of the top contenders in the newly formed Ukrainian Premier League. The team received silver medals in 1993 as well as the bronze in 1992, 1995, 1996, 2001, 2004. The team also reached the Ukrainian Cup finals in 1995, 1997 and 2004, but lost all three to Shakhtar Donetsk.

FC Dnipro is currently controlled by the Privat Group.

There is a friendship between supporters of Dnipro and Dynamo Kyiv.

The biggest rival is Metalist Kharkiv.

Stadia[edit]

Main articles: Stadium Meteor and Dnipro Arena
Current Dnipro Arena

Since 1966 Dnipro's home was Stadium Meteor in Dnipropetrovsk. Prior to that the club played at the Matalurh Stadium (formerly Stal Stadium). Meteor Stadium was built by the Soviet rocket company Yuzhmash on the original site and has undergone several renovations since, the last one being in 2001. However in 2002 after several spells in European competitions, it became clear that the club needed a new modern venue. Thus, in 2005 Pryvat Group started construction of Dnipro Arena in the centre of Dnipropetrovsk. The club played its last game at Meteor on 2 September 2008, against Metalist Kharkiv.

In April 2005 the club's new arena broke ground. It was constructed by Germany's largest construction company Hochtief. The construction itself took 3 years and 4 months, but a nine-month delay occurred due to a land dispute over a site where the stadium's car park was planned. The stadium's final capacity is 31,003 people and the initial estimated cost of the construction was set at €40,000,000.

The stadium was opened on 15 September 2008. The opening ceremony featured a speech by Ukrainian president Victor Yushchenko, a concert performance by a number of famous Ukrainian musicians and two football matches: Veterans of Dynamo Kyiv vs Spartak Moscow veterans, and Dnipro against Dynamo Kyiv. As a present to the club from the city the street that the stadium is situated on was renamed into Kucherevskyi Boulevard, in honour of Dnipro's late coach Yevhen Kucherevskyi. Dnipro played their first official game on 29 September 2008 against their local rivals FC Metalurh Zaporizhya, but Dnipro lost 1–2. They set a new attendance record for the Ukrainian Premier League 2008–09 season, at 31,000 spectators.

Sponsors[edit]

Football kits and sponsors[edit]

Years[2] Football kit Shirt sponsor
1998–2001 Adidas TM Biola
2001–2005 TM Biola
2005–2008 Umbro
2008–2014 Nike
2014–present Legea TM Biola
  • No information is known for the 2000-01 season.

Rivalry[edit]

Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk supporters biggest rival today is Metalist Kharkiv.[3] Despite this fans of both clubs marched in support of a "united Ukraine" in Kharkiv during the April 2014 pro-Russian conflict in Ukraine.[3]

European Cups History[edit]

UEFA Cup/Europa League:

Season Round Country Club Home Away Aggregate
UEFA Cup
1985–86 1 East Germany Wismut Aue 2–1 3–1 5–2
2 Netherlands PSV 1–0 2–2 3–2
3 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Hajduk Split 0–1 0–2 0–3
1986–87 1 Poland Legia Warsaw 0–0 0–1 0–1
1988–89 1 France Bordeaux 1–1 1–2 2–3
1990–91 1 Scotland Hearts 1–1 1–3 2–4
1993–94 1 Austria Admira Wacker 1–0 3–2 4–2
2 Germany Eintracht Frankfurt 1–0 0–2 1–2
1997–98 Q1 Armenia Yerevan 6–1 2–0 8–2
Q2 Russia Alania Vladikavkaz 1–2 1–4 2–6
2001–02 1 Italy Fiorentina 0–0 1–2 1–2
2003–04 Q1 Liechtenstein Vaduz 1–0 1–0 2–0
1 Germany HSV 3–0 1–2 4–2
2 Croatia Dinamo Zagreb 1–1 2–0 3–1
3 France Marseille 0–0 0–1 0–1
2004–05 Q2 Slovakia MFK Petržalka 3–0 1–1 4–1
1 Israel Maccabi Haifa 2–0 0–1 2–1
Group Belgium Club Brugge 3–2 1st
Netherlands Utrecht 2–1
Austria Austria Wien 1–0
Spain Real Zaragoza 1–2
1/16 Serbia Partizan 0-1 2-2 2-3
2005–06 Q2 Armenia Banants 4–0 4–2 8–2
1 Scotland Hibernian 5–1 0–0 5–1
Group Netherlands AZ Alkmaar 1–2 4th
England Middlesbrough 0–3
Bulgaria Litex Lovech 0–2
Switzerland Grasshoppers 3–2
2007–08 Q2 Poland GKS Bełchatów 1–1 4–2 5–3
1 Scotland Aberdeen 1–1 0–0 1–1
2008–09 Q2 Switzerland AC Bellinzona 3–2 1–2 4–4
UEFA Europa League
2010–11 Q3 Serbia Spartak Subotica 2–0 1–2 3–2
Play-off Poland Lech Poznań 0–1 0–0 0–1
2011–12 Play-off England Fulham 1–0 0–3 1–3
2012–13 Play-off Czech Republic Slovan Liberec 4–2 2–2 6–4
Group Netherlands PSV 2–0 2–1 1st
Italy Napoli 3–1 2–4
Sweden AIK 4–0 3–2
1/16 Switzerland Basel 1–1 0–2 1–3
2013–14 Play-off Estonia Nomme Kalju 2–0 3–1 5–1
Group Italy Fiorentina 1–2 1–2 2nd
Portugal Paços Ferreira 2–0 2–0
Romania Pandurii 4–1 1–0
1/16 England Tottenham 1–0 1–3 2–3

European Cup/UEFA Champions League:

Season Round Country Club Home Away Aggregate
European Cup
1984–85 1 Turkey Trabzonspor 3–0 0–1 3–1
2 Bulgaria Levski Sofia 2–0 1–3 3–3
Q France Bordeaux 1–1 1–1 3–5 (p)
1989–90 1 Northern Ireland Linfield 2–1 1–0 3–1
2 Austria Tirol Innbruck 2–0 2–2 4–2
Q Portugal Benfica 0–1 0–3 0–4
UEFA Champions League
2014–15 Q3 Denmark Copenhagen 0–0

Honours[edit]

Domestic[edit]

Continental[edit]

Invitational[edit]

Other[edit]

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

As of 25 July 2014[4][5]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
2 Romania DF Alexandru Vlad
3 Czech Republic DF Ondřej Mazuch
4 Ukraine MF Serhiy Kravchenko
5 Ukraine DF Vitaliy Mandzyuk
7 Georgia (country) MF Jaba Kankava
8 Ukraine DF Volodymyr Polyovyi
9 Croatia FW Nikola Kalinić
10 Ukraine MF Yevhen Konoplyanka
11 Ukraine FW Yevhen Seleznyov
12 Brazil MF Leo Matos
14 Ukraine DF Yevhen Cheberyachko
16 Czech Republic GK Jan Laštůvka
17 Croatia DF Ivan Strinić
No. Position Player
18 Ukraine FW Roman Zozulya
20 Portugal MF Bruno Gama
21 Croatia MF Mladen Bartulović
23 Brazil DF Douglas
28 Ukraine MF Yevhen Shakhov
39 Ukraine DF Oleksandr Svatok
44 Ukraine DF Artem Fedetskyi
71 Ukraine GK Denys Boyko
77 Ukraine GK Denys Shelikhov
89 Ukraine MF Serhiy Politylo
91 Ukraine GK Ihor Vartsaba
97 Ukraine MF Andriy Blyznychenko
99 Brazil FW Matheus

Out on loan[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
Ghana DF Samuel Inkoom (at Platanias)
Cameroon DF Éric Matoukou (at ?)
Ukraine MF Hennadiy Pasich (at Naftovyk-Ukrnafta)
Ukraine MF Yevhen Pasich (at Naftovyk-Ukrnafta)
No. Position Player
Georgia (country) MF Aleksandre Kobakhidze (at Volyn Lutsk)
Ukraine MF Valeriy Fedorchuk (at Volyn Lutsk)
Ukraine MF Ruslan Babenko (at Volyn Lutsk)
Ukraine FW Yevhen Bokhashvili (at Volyn Lutsk)

League and Cup history[edit]

Soviet Union[edit]

Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Domestic Cup Europe Notes
1977 1st 12 30 9 9 12 24 31 27 1/8
1978 1st 16 30 9 3 18 25 39 21 1/16 Relegated
1979 2nd 17 46 16 14 16 57 60 44 Group stage
1980 2nd 2 46 27 8 11 60 47 62 Group stage Promoted
1981 1st 8 34 12 8 14 42 53 32 Group stage
1982 1st 9 34 11 12 11 34 38 32 1/2
1983 1st 1 34 22 5 7 63 36 49 1/4
1984 1st 3 34 17 8 9 54 40 42 1/8 ECL 1/4
1985 1st 3 34 16 11 7 71 41 42 1/4 UC 1/8
1986 1st 11 30 8 12 10 41 41 28 1/16 UC 1st round
1987 1st 2 30 15 9 6 42 22 39 1/16
1988 1st 1 30 18 10 2 49 23 46 1/2 UC 1st round
1989 1st 2 30 18 6 6 47 27 42 Winner ECL 1/4
1990 1st 6 24 11 6 7 39 26 28 1/16 finals UC 1st round
1991 1st 9 30 9 10 11 31 36 28 1/8 finals

Ukraine[edit]

Season Div. Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA P Domestic Cup Europe Notes
1992 1st 3 18 10 3 5 26 15 23 1/4 finals yielded to FC Metalist Kharkiv
1/8 final of Soviet Cup
1992–93 1st 2 30 18 8 4 51 20 44 1/8 finals
1993–94 1st 4 34 16 9 9 53 35 41 1/4 finals UC 2nd round
1994–95 1st 3 34 19 8 7 60 33 65 Runner-up
1995–96 1st 3 34 19 6 9 65 34 63 1/4 finals
1996–97 1st 4 30 14 13 3 48 19 55 Runner-up
1997–98 1st 4 30 17 4 9 47 27 55 1/4 finals UC 2nd qual round
1998–99 1st 12 30 9 5 16 28 46 32 1/8 finals
1999–00 1st 11 30 8 9 13 26 52 33 1/8 finals
2000–01 1st 3 26 17 4 5 37 18 55 1/2 finals
2001–02 1st 6 26 11 7 8 30 20 40 1/2 finals UC 1st round
2002–03 1st 4 30 18 5 7 48 27 59 1/2 finals
2003–04 1st 3 30 16 9 5 44 23 57 Runner-up UC 3rd round
2004–05 1st 4 30 13 9 8 38 34 48 1/2 finals UC Round of 32
2005–06 1st 6 30 11 10 9 33 23 43 1/8 finals UC Group stage
2006–07 1st 4 30 11 14 5 32 24 47 1/4 finals
2007–08 1st 4 30 18 5 7 40 27 59 1/16 finals UC 1st round
2008–09 1st 6 30 13 9 8 34 25 48 1/8 finals UC 2nd qual round
2009–10 1st 4 30 15 9 6 48 25 54 1/4 finals
2010–11 1st 4 30 16 9 5 46 20 57 1/2 finals EL Play-off Round
2011–12 1st 4 30 15 7 8 52 35 52 1/8 finals EL Play-off Round
2012–13 1st 4 30 16 8 6 54 27 56 1/2 finals EL Round of 32
2013–14 1st 2 28 18 5 5 56 28 59 1/8 finals EL 1/16 finals
2014–15 1st UCL 3rd qual round

European history[edit]

Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk participates in European competitions since 1984 after playing its first against Trabzonspor. Since 2001, however, the club participates almost on annual basis with variable successes.

Season Achievement Notes
European Cup / UEFA Champions League
1984–85 Quarter-Finalist eliminated by France Bordeaux 1–1 in Bordeaux, 1–1 in Dnipropetrovsk
1989–90 Quarter-Finalist eliminated by Portugal Benfica 0–1 in Lisbon, 0–3 in Dnipropetrovsk


Managers[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]